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Thread: The other founders

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    John Bishop is offline
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    Default The other founders

    Although some people refer to "Kajukenbo" as a Kenpo system. Kenpo is in fact only one of the 5 major (Karate, Judo, Jujitsu, Kenpo, & Chinese boxing) and 2 minor fighting arts (western boxing & Escrima) that make up the American martial art of "Kajukenbo".
    Below are the bios of the 4 other founders of Kajukenbo.

    Frank Ordanez
    Highly sophistiscated in the martial arts and contributing the Japanese Kodokan Judo/Sekeino Jujitsu with Joseph Holck, Professor Ordonez is one of the five who helped create Kajukenbo. His two most notable instructors were Okizaki black belt, Sam Luke, and Mitose black belt, Thomas Young.

    He is an Honorable Member of the Kuo Min Tang Physical Culture Association.

    His martial arts training experience extended to Kenpo Karate, Judo, jui jitsu, and boxing.
    Just as important as his physical acheivements, is his philosophical contributions to the martial arts.

    Prof. Ordonez is the man credited with creating the Kajukenbo prayer.
    By his own admission he says that the martial arts has affected him greatly in that he discovered his weaknesses and learned to strengthen them.

    He's also learned to integrate the mind, body, and emotions. His philosophy in life is "knowing others is wisdom. Knowing the self is enlightenment"

    Today, he states that the martial arts generates the youth to a path of righteousness. And that self improvement begins with an assessment of the basis of your own self respect. And from this point you proceed to the basis on which you must have the respect of others.
    Prof. Ordonez once said "understanding the mind, then harnessing it's hidden power's, will bring stability, clarity of the mind, inner peace, contentment, and the power to erase negative attitudes and develop a positive nature".

    Peter Y.Y. Choo
    Prof. Peter Choo was born in Honolulu, Hawaii. He was one of the co-creators of Kajukenbo. Responsible for the Korean art of Tang Soo Do or the "KA" in Kajukenbo, (and to a lesser extent western boxing). Grandmaster Choo studied with Professor J Rhee in Tae Kwon Do, Professor Sam Luke in Judo, and Koichi Tohei, a 10th degree master in Aikido. He had the priviledge of training at master Tohei's home.
    Grandmaster Choo received the prestigeous 1937 Joe Lynch Boxing Award. (Joe Lynch was the trainer of Max Baer, the Heavyweight Champion of the world in 1934-1936). He also received several of championship awards during his three years of tourney with the 6th Army Far East, U.S. Army Europe Troops as a Green Beret.

    Professor Choo has quoted, "if you think you're beaten, you are. If you think you dare not, you won't, if you'd like to win, but think you can't, almost an cinch, you won't. For life's battles don't always go to the stronger or faster man. For sure as fate, the man who wins is the man who thinks HE CAN!"

    Prof. Peter Choo was inducted into the Hawaii Martial Arts Society Hall of Fame in 1999.
    Prof. Choo passed away in Hawaii in 1997.

    George 'Clarence' Chang - 1926-2003
    George Chang was also known as Clarence Chang.
    He contributed the "BO" in the KaJuKenBo system known as the Chinese Boxing - Gung-Fu style.

    His family, friends, and co-founders know him as a refined individual, a outstanding martial artist and Korean War veteran.

    At the early age of twelve, George spent a few years in his father's native land, the province of Kwangtung, prior to World War II.
    While in China he got his initial start in the "hard / soft" system of Sil Lum Kung-FU (Shaolin).

    He retuned to Honolulu in 1941 when Hawaii was U.S. territory and not yet a state.
    Chang then furthered his Chinese style knowledge under the late Wong Kok Fut.

    While studying this art he acquired an interest in the art of Kenpo Karate and it was at that time he collaborated with the co-founders of the KaJuKenBo system.

    After the KaJuKenBo system was created in 1947, George enlisted in the United States Marine Corps Reserve in 1949.
    When the North Korean People's army crossed the 38th Parallel on June 25, 1950 and invaded South Korea, the United States intervened into the conflict and the "Korean War" began.
    With the shortage of combat troops, the U.S. Marine Corps Reserves were called upon into active duty and George went to Korea.

    At one time George was rumored to have been killed or Missing In Action, but he did survive the war, and returned to Hawaii where he passed away in 2003.

    JOSEPH HOLCK
    Joichi Matsuno, JUDAN (10th Degree Black Belt) changed his name to Joseph Holck due to World War II, Pearl Harbor, anti-Japanese feelings against any American citizen of Japanese heritage.

    Holck, Shihan, began training in Danzan-Ryu Jujitsu in 1938 at the KODENKAN under Professor H. Seishiro Okazaki. He later received instruction under instructors Bing Fai Lau and Sig Kufferath at both the Kodenkan and Kaheka Lane dojos on the territory of Hawaii. Hawaii had not yet become a state at that time.

    In 1944, he volunteered for the U. S. Army and underwent Basic Training in Texas. Due to his martial arts background, he was designated the hand-to-hand combat instructor of his basic training unit. Following World War II, Joe Holck, Shihan, was stationed in Germany during the European Occupation. He was assigned as hand-to-hand combat instructor for the 9th Infantry Division Non-Commissioned Officers' Academy.

    In 1947, Holck, Shihan, returned to Hawaii and continued training in Danzan-Ryu Jujitsu under Kufferath, Sensei. He received his Kaidensho Moku Roku (instructor's scrolls) from Professor Okazaki in 1949.

    Between 1947 and 1949, Holck, Shihan was also one of five co-founders of an eclectic Hawaiian bred martial arts system known as KAJUKENBO, along with Adriano Emperado, Peter Choo, Frank Ordonez and Clarence Chang.

    About this same time ( 1948 ), Holck, Shihan, began Kodokan judo training under the great Professor T. Inouye, Rokudan (6th Degree Black Belt), and former All-Japan Collegiate Champion. In 1951, Joe Holck, Shihan, received his Shodan in judo from the KODOKAN.

    Holck, Shihan, continued teaching martial arts in Hawaii until 1964, and then moved to Tucson, Arizona. That same year, he received his Godan (5th Degree Black Belt) from the American Jujitsu Institute.

    Shortly after his settling in Arizona, Holck, Shihan, took over as chief instructor of the KODENKAN of Tucson dojo, started by his younger brother, Roy A. V. Holck, Sensei in 1962.

    Later that year, he received training in the Hakkoryu style of Jujitsu under John Graves, Sensei, Yodan (4th Degree Black Belt). Holck, Shihan, received his Shodan rank a year later.

    The original KODENKAN of Tucson dojo grew into an organization founded by Holck, Shihan and his family in 1967, known as the KODENKAN YUDANSHAKAI, "School of the Ancient Traditions Black Belt Society".

    Since that time, Joe Holck, Shihan, has been intensely involved in his organization, KODENKAN Yudanshakai, which teaches not only Danzan-Ryu Jujitsu, but also Shorin-Ryu Karate, Wado Kai Karate Do, Matsuno-Ryu Goshin-Jitsu and Kajukenbo.

    Danzan Ryu as translated and interpreted by Holck, Shihan, means in a deeper sense, "steps to greater heights", and alludes to the climbing of a mountain. The Danzan Ryu system teaches the student to think beyond the achievement of higher ranks in the martial arts. Instead the student learns to develop and grow throughout the steps in life itself.

    In 1989, after a very long and extremely distinguished career in the martial arts, Joe Holck, Shihan, was elevated to the rank of JUDAN (10th Degree Black Belt).

    In the past 60 plus years, Holck, Shihan, has been recognized for his contribution to the martial arts from all sectors of our society. These are too numerous to mention in this short biography. He has actively encouraged Jujitsu randori competition and has cultivated an interest in competitive Jujitsu Kata and Jujitsu Freestyle.

    Last edited by Bob Hubbard; 02-16-2005 at 12:03 PM. Reason: fixed Font color fix due to sw hiccup

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    sifuroy (04-09-2007),Z-Rex (04-09-2007)

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    Default Re: The other founders

    Mr. Bishop-

    I very seldom reply to your post but read a lot of them on different forums. I just wanted to say that I appreciate the time, effort, and energy that you put into history and information to pass on to others. Thank you.

    Brian Hunter

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    zealous Kenpoist Guest

    Default Re: The other founders

    No Kidding! Mr. Bishop seems to be THE MAN on Kajukenbo knowledge. CUDOS

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    John Bishop is offline
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    Default Re: The other founders

    Four of the Kajukenbo founders at the 50 year anniversary in 1997, Vallejo, Ca.

    Left to Right: Peter Choo, Joe Holck, Frank Ordanez, Adriano Emperado (seated)
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Thumbs up Re: The other founders

    Hi John,

    Very informative, as always I enjoy your post and information...

    I am looking forward to getting that new DVD...

    Regards, Gary

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    ackks10 is offline
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    Default Re: The other founders

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bishop
    Four of the Kajukenbo founders at the 50 year anniversary in 1997, Vallejo, Ca.

    Left to Right: Peter Choo, Joe Holck, Frank Ordanez, Adriano Emperado (seated)
    Hey John, what do you know about Mike Young?? and Kimo Feraio(i think i spelled that wrong)
    " Resolve to be tender with the young,compassionate with the aged,sympathetic with the striving,tolerant with the weak and wrong..... Because sometime in your life you will have been all of these"

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    John Bishop is offline
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    Default Re: The other founders

    Quote Originally Posted by lonekimono10
    Hey John, what do you know about Mike Young?? and Kimo Feraio(i think i spelled that wrong)
    Short version.
    Master Mike Young is a kung fu practitioner/historian who acts as a "advisor" to the Kajukenbo system, along with Grandmaster Ming Lum and Grandmaster Al Novak.

    Kimo Ferierra was a black belt in the "Universal Kempo" system under Walter Godin and Martin Buell. He now ranks himself as a 10th degree in his own system of "Kempo Jutsu Kai".

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    Wink Re: The other founders

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bishop
    Short version.
    Master Mike Young is a kung fu practitioner/historian who acts as a "advisor" to the Kajukenbo system, along with Grandmaster Ming Lum and Grandmaster Al Novak.

    Kimo Ferierra was a black belt in the "Universal Kempo" system under Walter Godin and Martin Buell. He now ranks himself as a 10th degree in his own system of "Kempo Jutsu Kai".
    Hi,
    I find it interesting that a couple of these fellows are also advisers on the MACS board for Hanshi Bruce Juchnik. All great minds think similar, I guess.
    They all seem to be like the bouncing ball.

    I like both arts Kaji and Kosho, I think both founders were good at what they did. I feel that one of them was pretty much a scoundrel. Hmm I wonder which one. Let's discuss it? Or not!

    Hanshi Juchnik is teaching more of the Filipino arts now than in the past.
    Something that Kaji always did. I find them both to be what I would consider well rounded and fully packed.

    I find that both of them are very controversial, just because of the founders. If you are going to give one some slack, then both should receive it in my opinion. Any thoughts on this???

    Regards, Gary

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    Default Re: The other founders

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary A Brewer
    Hi,
    I find it interesting that a couple of these fellows are also advisers on the MACS board for Hanshi Bruce Juchnik. All great minds think similar, I guess.
    They all seem to be like the bouncing ball.

    I like both arts Kaji and Kosho, I think both founders were good at what they did. I feel that one of them was pretty much a scoundrel. Hmm I wonder which one. Let's discuss it? Or not!

    Hanshi Juchnik is teaching more of the Filipino arts now than in the past.
    Something that Kaji always did. I find them both to be what I would consider well rounded and fully packed.

    I find that both of them are very controversial, just because of the founders. If you are going to give one some slack, then both should receive it in my opinion. Any thoughts on this???

    Regards, Gary
    i am in complete agreement with you on this, Gary. There are more than a few high ranking guys out there with a checkered past. If the requirement for having a legitimate art is having a clean record.......then everyone should drop what they're doing.

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    RevIV is offline
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    Default Re: The other founders

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bishop
    Short version.
    Master Mike Young is a kung fu practitioner/historian who acts as a "advisor" to the Kajukenbo system, along with Grandmaster Ming Lum and Grandmaster Al Novak.

    Kimo Ferierra was a black belt in the "Universal Kempo" system under Walter Godin and Martin Buell. He now ranks himself as a 10th degree in his own system of "Kempo Jutsu Kai".
    Mr. Bishop. I have also enjoyed and educated myself with the history that you have written on the webpages. I was under the assumption though that Prof. Kimo received his 5th Degree from Prof. Godin. Now i am not trying to stir things up at all. and if you look Prof. Kimo is one of my teachers so i am not hiding things here just trying to clear things for myself and others.
    In Peace
    Jesse

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    John Bishop is offline
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    Default Re: The other founders

    Quote Originally Posted by RevIV
    Mr. Bishop. I have also enjoyed and educated myself with the history that you have written on the webpages. I was under the assumption though that Prof. Kimo received his 5th Degree from Prof. Godin. Now i am not trying to stir things up at all. and if you look Prof. Kimo is one of my teachers so i am not hiding things here just trying to clear things for myself and others.
    In Peace
    Jesse
    Nothing being stirred up. Martin Buell was one of Walter Godin's first black belts. He took over running the "Godin's Chinese Kempo" schools the first time Godin went to prison. Eventually they became his "Universal Kempo" schools. Kimo did receive a 5th degree from Godin's, but it was many years after his initual training with Martin Buell.

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    Default Re: The other founders

    Quote Originally Posted by John Bishop
    Nothing being stirred up. Martin Buell was one of Walter Godin's first black belts. He took over running the "Godin's Chinese Kempo" schools the first time Godin went to prison. Eventually they became his "Universal Kempo" schools. Kimo did receive a 5th degree from Godin's, but it was many years after his initual training with Martin Buell.
    Thank you Mr. Bishop I appreciate that.
    In Peace
    Jesse

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    Rickg is offline
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    My Instructor is Chief Instructor Stan Papas. He is one of the Original Chief Instructors of Universal Kempo Karate Schools. He was present when Martin Buel was promoted to Professor attending and participating in the demonstrations of that day. I am glad that someone mentions Professor Buel now and again. I spent some very good years of my training under the Universal kempo Karate Schools and Professor Buel. I am no longer a member more do to logistics than anything else. Professor Godin even though he had some problems trained some very fine Martial Artists that have there own systems today and have been good influences on many young people.

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    sifuroy is offline In Memory of our Departed Friend
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    Default Re: The other founders

    Thanks,We all need a reminder of who the founders were. This was a very well researched and written post. I enjoyed it very much!

    I am Most Respectfully,
    Sifuroy

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    Question Re: The other founders

    Mr.Bishop,

    Speaking of Kajukenbo's lineage. What about the systems that have sprung from Kajukenbo, like Won Hop Kuen Do? I know that Won Hop Kuen Do is a kung-fu system that sprang from Kajukenbo's CMA roots. Are there others that are as evolved? Are there more that can stand as a system on their own merits? Much like EPAK sprang from the roots of Mr.Wm (Thunderbolt)Chow's kenpo . Which as most of us are aware. Has become a huge stand alone system. Which since 1990 has had an explosion of systems spring out of it. Thanks in advance for the history lesson.

    1stJohn1:9

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    John Bishop is offline
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    These are the recognized styles and methods of the Kajukenbo system.



    Systems that trace their lineage to Kajukenbo are:
    CHA-3 Kenpo, Kenkabo, Ken-Ka Kung Fu, Nick Cerio's Kenpo, Karazenpo Go Shinjutsu, George Pesare's Kempo, Universal Kempo, Chinese Kempo, Hawaiian Kenpo, Kajukenpo Pai Lum, Goshin-Jutsu Kenpo, White Tiger Kempo, Kenbo-aii, Ju Ka Kung Kenpo, and a few more I can't remember right now.

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    KAJUKENBO- CH'UAN FA

    Adriano Emperado felt that the Chinese martial arts had an abundance of technical diversity to offer to the kajukenbo system.
    One thought he entertained was a complete evolution to a kajukenbo style with a much stronger Chinese emphasis. This brought about the development of kajukenbo ch’uan fa in the 1960’s. Aiding in this development was Al Dela Cruz and Al Dacascos, both black belts from Sid Asuncion’s kajukenbo school.
    Originally named tum pai by Emperado, the first phase of development involved the incorporation of southern styles of kung fu and tai chi. Al Dela Cruz helped with this development by converting the first two Pinan’s to forms more resembling Chinese forms. Although they kept the same foot movements, the hard linear hand movements were replaced by softer hand movements. And many of the hard style horse stances were replaced with very low deep cat stances, resembling those of the southern Chinese sil-lum systems. During this time Al Dacascos was also training with Eugene Ho, a Siu Lum Pai Association instructor who was a student of Buck Sam Kong. This kung fu training provided Dacascos with knowledge that he also contributed to the tum pai development.
    Professor Wong, a.k.a. “Old Man Wong” of the Honolulu Chinatown kung fu Association was also a strong influence on, and supporter of Emperado efforts in this endeavor to incorporate more kung fu into the kajukenbo system.
    In the winter of 1964, Dacascos moved to the San Francisco Bay area of California. Over the next couple of years he established associations with many of the Chinese martial artists in that area. One group in particular was the San Jose Chinese Physical Cultural Center. The instructor there was Paul Ng. Ng taught a southern style called fu-chow, a element of the hong-ga kin system. Also in the group was Kam Yuen and Ron Lew of the tai mantis system. One of the focuses of this group was to learn the northern sil-lum or northern pak-pai system from Professor Wong Jack Man.
    In 1965, Al Dacascos held a meeting in California with Adriano Emperado and Al Dela Cruz to discuss the state of the tum pai branch. Dacascos explained to them that he thought the tum pai name was no longer applicable to the new branch, because it had now evolved to also include northern kung fu techniques. After he demonstrated to them the long range northern techniques that he had learned, like high jumping butterfly kicks, and full circle sweeps, they agreed with him that a more appropriate name should be used to describe this evolving branch of kajukenbo. They agreed to replace the name tum pai with the name ch’uan fa. Dacascos developed a written system of 82 training exercises, drills, and requirements to teach the concepts and principles of the new kajukenbo ch’uan fa. And a number of Chinese forms like, fua yip, limpo, and pak sil-lum were also added to the ch’uan fa branch. Ch’uan fa became a official branch in 1966.
    At the time it was Emperado’s desire to have all the existing kajukenbo schools convert to the new ch’uan fa style. Al Dela Cruz was given the assignment to teach the new ch’uan fa techniques to the kajukenbo instructors in Hawaii, and Al Dacascos was to do the same with the instructors in California.
    The conversion to this new style of kajukenbo was met with some resistance by a number of instructors who preferred the original “hard style” kajukenbo. Emperado allowed those instructors to continue to teach the original style. While some other instructors choose to develop their own methods of ch’uan fa.
    One change Emperado did require of all schools was the adoption of Chinese titles to replace the Japanese titles that were used previously. Sifu, the Chinese title for teacher, replaced the title of sensei. Professor Emperado took the title sijo, which is the Chinese title for founder.
    Later, other Chinese titles like sigung were also added to the kajukenbo rank structure.
    As will be discussed below, more branches of kajukenbo evolved, and methods of those branches evolved even more.

    © KAJUKENBO-The Original Mixed Martial Art, 2006

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    John Bishop is offline
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    KAJUKENBO - WUN HOP KUEN DO

    Wun hop kuen do was the next evolutionary change for the kajukenbo system. This branch of kajukenbo was the brainchild of Al Dacascos. The literal meaning of wun hop kuen do is, combination fist art style.
    In the years following the development of ch’uan fa, Dacascos continued to get more and more involved in the study of the Chinese martial arts. During this time period he was also making changes and additions to ch’uan fa. Hence the ch’uan fa that he was practicing and teaching, was starting to take on a new and separate identity. It was becoming a personal expression of the kajukenbo, tum pai, ch’uan fa, and other martial arts that Dacascos had learned.
    Since this style is always being developed, it is not a fixed system. This means that won hop kuen do founder Al Dacascos is always striving to improve the style by incorporation and improvement of useful methods or techniques.
    In addition, the philosophy of remaining "unfixed" also applies to the styles defense techniques, in that there is no defined responses to a given situations. And an attempt is made to fit the response to the situation as it arises. This concept leads to self defense techniques that are creative and allows one to think about what is the best response. Wun hop kuen do has many drills that develop the type of fluidity and creativity that lead to the ability to respond reflexively to any situation.
    Although wun hop kuen do is not a fixed style it does contain a written system of techniques, training methods and philosophies. The result is a system of training methods and maneuvers that teaches one to be system-less. The following are the 25 technical fighting principles of wun hop kuen do:
    1. Setups
    2. Positioning
    3. Independent Movement
    4. Initial Speed
    5. Critical Distance Line
    6. Line of attack
    7. Bridging the gap
    8. Five Primary Techniques
    9. Lead vs. Rear side
    10. Economy of motion
    11. Relaxation vs. Tension
    12. Mobility vs. Immobility
    13. Extension, hyper-extension, and double hyper-extension
    14. Leading centers
    15. Unpredictability vs. Classical form
    16. Straight line vs. curved line
    17. Defensive choices
    18. Initial speed vs. combinations
    19. Faking
    20. Constant forward pressure
    21. Time commitment theory
    22. Defensive movement patterns
    23. Angle of attack vs technique variation
    24. Half, full, and extension commitment
    25. Theory of broken rhythm

    © KAJUKENBO-The Original Mixed Martial Art, 2006

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    John Bishop is offline
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    Default Re: The other founders

    KAJUKENBO - TUM PAI

    The original concept and development of techniques for tum pai was started by Adriano Emperado, Al Dacascos and Al Dela Cruz, in the early 60's. It was a attempt to create an advanced style for the Kajukenbo system that would incorporate more Chinese elements into the system.
    In the mid-60's the developments that made up tum pai became incorporated into what was to be renamed ch'uan fa, thus leaving the tum pai concept in an indeterminate state.
    In 1971, Jon Loren started incorporating the concepts of tai-chi and southern sil-lum into his kajukenbo classes. This was called northern kajukenbo until 1974. In 1974, while staying with Adriano Emperado in Hawaii, he demonstrated his concepts and techniques and asked if he could call it tum pai and bring the name back to life. Emperado granted permission with the acknowledgement that the original tum pai followed a different path than the revised tum pai soft style.

    Here are the distinctions of the Tum Pai system:

    Northern Tum Pai – Hybrid Gung-fu

    The initial foundation of northern tum pai is based upon the Chinese combined classical structures of combat (northern praying mantis, southern sil-lum, eagle claw, etc.), tai chi ch’uan, and the streetwise techniques of the kajukenbo system. Tum Pai is a street art, not a sport, and is aggressive tai chi application gung-fu. Competition is not taught, but rather, students work out together without a win/lose concept. There are no winners and no losers. To this effect, it is noted for six specific structural characteristics as its basis for creativity and originality.
    1. Soft Style Applications of Tai Chi Ch’uan: Northern tum pai is characterized by the fact that it is, in essence, the street application of tai chi ch’uan, using its theories of evasion, off-centering, yielding, rooting, reversing, and redirecting the flow of attack in a non-muscular way, allowing a person of any size to defend themselves. Basic tai chi practice is a regular part of tum pai training. The advanced theory and application of tai chi in northern tum pai is called yam foon jeet sow fut; translated, it means “night wind intercepting palm”. Tum Pai is based on traditional tai chi, not simplified or modified. It contains all the traditional weapon use. Tum Pai has its own tai chi certification program (initiated in 1975) as a separate art, as well as being a structural part of tum pai. In order for one in tum pai to certify a student as a separate tai chi teacher, they must have our tai chi certification themselves.

    Tum Pai Tai Chi Instructor Requirements (Certification):
    — Minimum of 4 ½ years of training time
    (Minimum of 10 lessons per month)
    (Minimum of 15 minutes of personal practice — 7 days a week)
    Acceptable Completion (Viewed by Board) of:
    — Short and Long Yang style Form
    — Yang style Sword Long Form
    — Yang style Sum Quay Sword Form
    — Ng style Long Form
    — Single and double push hands (Yang & Ng Form)
    — Yang style Da lu
    — Chi gua concepts and exercise practice
    — Tai Chi physiology, energy alignment, structural alignment and breath concepts
    — Tai Chi thesis (thesis on any subject related to Tai Chi – approved by Teacher – 7 typed pages minimum)
    — Three day Tai Chi solo campout: Requirements given at time
    — Final Tai Chi test (must achieve 2 out of 4 tests)

    2. Tendon Structure: Northern tum pai ‘expression’ is based on a relaxed tendon structure concept, which aligns the overall posture of: arms, legs, feet, and hands. It structures them so that it eliminates muscularity, and opens the pathways for your internal energy to be focused and transmitted through, thus enhancing speed, reaction, and explosion. The enhancement of chi gives the practitioner a ‘feeling touch’ that is used to sense an attack and to give the practitioner a magnetic feel in chi sao (sticky hands) application. Tum Pai does not oppose force, it redirects force, reverses force, or yields to force. Tum Pai only operates in the relaxed physical and emotional state. There isn’t a rigid state. Power is issued by focused explosive chi strikes or the manipulation of the attacker’s central nervous system as in chin-na grappling.
    3. Open Hand Training: Tum Pai is noted for its open hand techniques, versus the closed hand (fist) techniques. Though some techniques incorporated the fist way, the majority of the redirecting (blocking) and striking techniques are open hand. Because of the energy development and alignment in tum pai training, the slap-poke open hand tendon structure alignment, the magnetic pull, and the open palm internal energy strikes are a major part of the tum pai martial application. The relaxed open ‘feeling hands’ are a trademark of the tum pai system, and its yam foon jeet sow fut advanced system.
    4. Night Wind Forms (Yam Foon Jeet Sow Fut): These forms were created over a 20-year span to emphasize non-opposition, circular redirection (small circle theory) as opposed to linear motion, relaxed non-muscular movement that emphasizes internal energy, and noted especially for its explosive releasing of energy. Tum Pai and its “night wind” forms are thus a style of tai chi that teaches students tai chi energy movement coupled with realistic martial techniques. Tum Pai is considered combative tai chi in motion, and “yam foon jeet sow fut” is its advanced application.
    5. Outdoor Training: It is one of the few systems that incorporate outdoor martial survival training, living, and trained sensitivity awareness developed from harmony with nature as a regular part of its curriculum. Advance testing for higher ranks incorporates these outdoor training skills to enhance a practitioner both mentally and spiritually, and to learn to gather from the earth’s forces an energy connection that is not only used martially, but in everyday life.
    6. The Healing Art: Tum Pai is noted not only as a strong internal gung-fu art, but it is also noted for its ability to naturally restore one’s health from regular training. All techniques of martial structure are health-based and aligned through tai chi principals. This creates a constant flow of energy throughout the body, receiving and expelling through the Earth’s forces so that the body’s organs, nerves, muscles, etc. are constantly balanced. This is coupled with internal health principles, restorative massage, nervous system knowledge, and herbal health principles. A senior teacher would thus have a good knowledge of medicinal herbal health as well as being a high level martial artist. There is a separate herbal certificate for individuals who specialize in herbal medicinal health.

    Tum Pai Description
    As a hybrid gung-fu system, northern tum pai differs from classical systems, for it contains emphasis on defense against American boxing, wrestling, and advanced street fighting attacks, rather than oriental attack. Not having one set pattern for defense against these, it teaches to change its flow and pattern to whatever type of situation occurs.
    Though it has classical roots and teaches, partly, the classical way (traditions, customs, basic structures and healing), it also teaches the “hybrid way” of no ties, restraints, or bindings to hinder the ultimate defense. In other words, it teaches the foundations to the practitioner, but he himself develops “his way” or his own system from the basic structure to fit himself. The system therefore does not teach the student, but only helps “guide” him, “for he himself makes himself”.
    Though it usually takes approximately six months to acquire basic knowledge and ability for an average street attack, it must be noted that to obtain a complete basic structure in northern tum pai, it would take approximately five years of continuous training. For students who want to live the art, there are five more years of intermediate training and a lifetime for advanced training (this includes inner strength development, various nerve manipulation, and poking (chin na techniques, and energy healing coupled with extensive herbal training). It is from these structures – forms and techniques training, etc. – that students, through confidence, can naturally become themselves and gather the tools for self-expression and creativity emphasized by northern tum pai.
    The structures are then their tools to work with, so that, basically, a student would never run out of new tools (techniques) and would be a student of learning all their life. There is always more to learn about the system, more to learn about themselves, and more to create and experiment with to fit themselves. During their life in the art, the student would be touching tradition, but yet not be tied or bound to any structure, for these are just many rays of light to many “paths” out of the darkness. tum pai’s goal is to live long and feel good.

    Northern Tum Pai
    Application Description
    Northern tum pai is not a sport. Rather, it is an art based on street application of self-defense that holds no rules or guidelines from sport competition other than the philosophical philosophy of the wu teh code (warrior’s moral and etiquette code). Martial code is taught as the core and spirit of northern tum pai. It emphasizes one’s complete honor and sacrifice in defending one’s self or loved ones.
    Emphasizing a strong mental attitude and bearing, it is balanced by technical soft style evasion, redirecting, and reversing the flow of attack concept in a non-muscular energy direction way, allowing a person of any size to defend themselves. Instruction includes basic, intermediate and advanced open-hand form (night wind forms) training, weapon sets, tricks (punching attack applications), ground grappling, locking, sweeping, throwing, kicking, and open-closed hand and elbow striking. Inner grappling includes chi sao (sticking hands) neutralizing and nerve poking, and chin’na (nerve locking) techniques. Weapon defensive and offensive instruction includes: short knife, club (short and long stick) staff, chain, sword (double edge and broad), three-sectional staff, the fan, throwing stars, chain whip, and the bow and arrow.

    © KAJUKENBO-The Original Mixed Martial Art, 2006

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to John Bishop For This Useful Post:

    kenpochrstn (04-16-2007)

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    Question Re: The other founders

    Mr.Bishop,

    Thank you for your very in depth responses to my very broad questions. In regards to the sub system you mentioned called chu'an fa. Is'nt that a chinese(I don't know which dialect?) language version of kenpo? That being so. I assume that word chu'an fa was used instead of the anglecized kenpo, to primarily demonstrate the CMA roots? Further revealing the area in which Mr.Emperado(sp?) wanted to expand... Thank you for your consideration. I hope my conjecture is'nt to far left of field?

    1stJohn1:9

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