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Thread: Meditation

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    Default Meditation

    Is meditation part of your class "ritual"?

    It was and is still a part of my training.
    I was surprised when I studied shiatsu that this was also done at the beginning and end of a clinical classroom situation.

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    Default Re: Meditation

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackcatbonz
    Is meditation part of your class "ritual"?

    It was and is still a part of my training.
    I was surprised when I studied shiatsu that this was also done at the beginning and end of a clinical classroom situation.
    Good question, BCB!

    There are a lot of different types of meditation, and a lot of different reasons for doing it. What I usually have seen in classrom meditation is a brief chance to relax, clear the mind and focus at the beggining. Then, at the end it's a way to come down and recenter for reentering the real world.

    Most of what I do on my own is contemplative meditation. I take a topic, technique, principle, whatever, then quietly think about it. I try to lose all the extraneos garbage that goes on in my head and focus on the subject. Then, throughout the rest of the day, I periodically return to the topic, either as a way to clm and center myself or just to sort of go on mental cruise control.

    Of course there's standing and hugging your qi for long periods, focus point, and the other types of meditation. And meditation in movement- from just regulating breathing to walking through stances and footwork, to Taiji. I'm finding that going through the Yang 24 form is a better preparation than sitting crosslegged with everyone else and waiting for someone to yell "up!"

    I also use meditation techniques to relax in physical therapy sessions when the PT has his thumb burried in my sterno-clydo-mastoid muscle all the way to his second joint!

    So, yes, meditation is good for training, learning, and life skills. My opinion.

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    Default Re: Meditation

    not part of the class, but I have often used meditation to slow my breathing when i need it as well as going through my techniques and forms in my mind.. I usualy pick out little things i am doing wrong just by running it over and over in my head.
    "Do you have any bactine? Some of this blood is mine."

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    Default Re: Meditation

    Zazen, ritsuzen and a practice called "sighting the horizon" that has some similarities to CMA's Universal Post. There's also a bunch of specific meditations to incite various mental states and some very basic kiko. It really depends on the theme of the session and my personal inclinations.

    It's generally a pragmatic practice, since breathing in different modes and keeping your wits about you are so important.

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    Default Re: Meditation

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackcatbonz
    Is meditation part of your class "ritual"?

    It was and is still a part of my training.
    I was surprised when I studied shiatsu that this was also done at the beginning and end of a clinical classroom situation.
    Good question Black Cat..
    I feel very strongly about meditation. It's a very regular part of my training, but in class?? No...not so much. That's more out of necessity than anything really, and that's sad. We need ALL of our training time for the physical "Doing" of our art...though I know that the meditation practice would aid there too.

    Kudos on your study of Shiatsu!!!! I'd LOVE to study that. I've studied western systems of massage and I've got a lead on a school that's reachable that teaches the Chinese version of Shiatsu, Tui Na, but I don't know that much about it yet. I know that, like Shiatsu, it makes extensive use of pressure points and TCM....which I like. But for now, I'm simply trying to perfect the "Swede" massage that I'm taught.....
    and My wife and her friends let me practice ALL the time.

    Let me ask you this BCB: How do you feel that the study of body work, such as Shiatsu (Don't know what else you study or dabble in: Swedish like me, Indian systems, Raiki?) has affected your study of the martial arts??
    THanks (((Don't know, maybe that should be a separate thread?)))

    Your Brother
    John
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    Default Re: Meditation

    If I may augment the discussion:
    What form of meditation is used in your classes and/or personal training? There are different methods around the globe.

    thanks

    Your Brother
    John
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    Default Re: Meditation

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother John
    If I may augment the discussion:
    What form of meditation is used in your classes and/or personal training? There are different methods around the globe.
    The problem with classroom meditation is it is usually led by someone who thinks
    We need ALL of our training time for the physical "Doing" of our art... .
    There just isn't time to do a lot, and you are on his/her schedule. Having meditation interrupted is a lot like having the kids walk in on you...

    So, in a class situation, just concentrate on relaxation, breathing, and clearing the mind.

    But, since you asked, in my personal meditation I'm working on adding GUANGIFA as a foundational exercise in any meditation or qigong. It is a visualization technique which leads qi through specific paths involving specific cavities in the body.

    I'm also doing some positive attitude adjustments prior to meditating. Makes a huge difference in the quality of your meditative experience. Try this- just before you start, relax your body and mind, look up and paste a big, stupid smile on your face. Close your eyes and hold it for a moment. I generaly can feel the mental tension and stress roll down off my shoulders. Now, assume the position and start your meditation. It sounds stupid, but it works!

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    Default Re: Meditation

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother John
    Good question Black Cat..
    I feel very strongly about meditation.
    1.It's a very regular part of my training, but in class?? No...not so much. That's more out of necessity than anything really, and that's sad.

    2.We need ALL of our training time for the physical "Doing" of our art...though I know that the meditation practice would aid there too.

    3.Kudos on your study of Shiatsu!!!! I'd LOVE to study that. I've studied western systems of massage and I've got a lead on a school that's reachable that teaches the Chinese version of Shiatsu, Tui Na, but I don't know that much about it yet. I know that, like Shiatsu, it makes extensive use of pressure points and TCM....which I like. But for now, I'm simply trying to perfect the "Swede" massage that I'm taught.....
    and My wife and her friends let me practice ALL the time.

    4.Let me ask you this BCB: How do you feel that the study of body work, such as Shiatsu (Don't know what else you study or dabble in: Swedish like me, Indian systems, Raiki?) has affected your study of the martial arts??
    THanks (((Don't know, maybe that should be a separate thread?)))

    Your Brother
    John
    1. Meditation is a good thing for training and for everyday life.....at least it is and has been for me. Learning to meditate properly improved my results by allowing me to manage the time I had to devote to it and making every minute count.

    2. Training time for me always included meditation, almost every teacher I've had used meditation in class.......when they didn't, I did it myself before and after class. When others would ask me why, I would just tell them it was an easy way to prepare myself for learning at the beginning of class and to take a moment to reflect and store what I learned during, at the end.
    I started meditating around the time I turned 20......so when I started studying martial arts a few years later, it didnt seem at all odd to me that this was a part of the class "ritual".

    3. Thank you! I became interested in the healing arts because of my first kempo teacher. He learned something that was similar to kuatsu or kappo from his teacher and I simply thought it was cool........I was also recovering from a neck fracture when I started studying kempo. My chiropractor (who is also a good friend) was also an acupuncturist and he really encouraged me to study shiatsu.
    I studied shiatsu under Kensen Saito who was a personal student and friend of shiatsu founder Tokujiro Namikoshi.

    4. That is a great question for another thread.

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    Default Re: Meditation

    brother john, check out this thread

    Healing Arts

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    Default Re: Meditation

    Not strictly meditation, but this uses some meditation/qigong principles.

    I went to class yesterday in a different style- quite a bit different. I was doing ok with the movements, but in embryonic learning there is a tendency to be a little jerky. Sensei told me to "do it again, this time with flow." That reminded me of a technique- guiding the internal with conscious suggestion.

    The left brain is what we use to learn structure, order, and sequencing. But left minded focus can be fragmented and jerky. The right side of the brain is creativity and flow. I visualized engaging the right brain, and, perfection! After that, I drew a mental immage of the right and left brain dissected by a line to the tantien and had few problems.

    If you want to try this, the key is gentle suggestion and visualization. Like qi, you can't order or push it, but you can easily lead it.

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