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Thread: Kenjutsu and Jujutsu - Applying Principles and Techniques to Empty Hands

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    Question Kenjutsu and Jujutsu - Applying Principles and Techniques to Empty Hands

    I've often debated with people the direct correlation between Kenjutsu and Jujutsu.

    It is my personal belief that the study of one enhances the understanding of the other.
    I think that the use of something like strategic evasiveness or positioning taught for swordwork, right down to correct hand positions for nukitsuke and noto are directly applicable to empty hand arts.

    Do the guys and gals that make a serious study of Iai, Batto or Kenjutsu consciously take the principles from one and apply to the other?

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    gakusei's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kenjutsu and Jujutsu - Applying Principles and Techniques to Empty Hands

    Yes, very much.

    Entering, filling the void, keeping a weapon between you and your opponent cross over between sword and empty hand. Also, not much teaches you about timing and combat distance faster then someone swinging a weaon at you.

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    kroh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Kenjutsu and Jujutsu - Applying Principles and Techniques to Empty Hands

    An article I put up for the Ronin Journal...

    http://kroh1.tripod.com/littlecrow/i...try_id=1383465

    The sword teaches many principles that can directly relate to working without one. The greatest examples of weapon to non-weapon transference are Aikido, the martial arts of South East Asia, and Systema. These martial arts teach that there is no difference beween an armed and unarmed altercation in close range. They teach that the difference is all in the head. There are quite a few people who argue this point but they fail to see that just like anything in combat...you will fight as you train. If you come from one of those schools that teach hundreds of techniques that have to be practiced over the span of an hour at a time, three times a week, chances are that you will not be properly trained to do anything but gross motor movement when it counts. Comming from a school that teaches that all techniques are based of a small set of core dynamics and that they are all related to each other (armed or not), gives you a broad range of what you can do. You are not learning one technique for one situation but one for hundreds.

    If you look at some of the martial arts that teach the sword to teach the fist, you see that the only thing that really changes about the technique is the timing and distance. Some Indonesian systems teach the same techniques in increments by first starting off with a pole and then working in shorter increments until they get to the sword (usually a two and a half to three foot weapon) and then to the knife. The knife can be taught in the same range as the fist with minor tweaks.

    Great discussion...
    Regards,
    Walt

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    Default Re: Kenjutsu and Jujutsu - Applying Principles and Techniques to Empty Hands

    I hate saying "I agree".......but
    I agree.

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