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Thread: Teaching Seminars

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    Default Teaching Seminars

    I've never taught a seminar before.

    For those of you who have, how do you decide on a topic?

    At what rank did you start teaching them?

    Being that I'm only a second, I don't feel that I have enough mastery of a specific area that is unique enough to teach a seminar on. Know what I mean?

    Maybe I'm over-thinking it. I don't know.

    Tell me of your experiences.

    --Amy
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    I'm a member of the Universal Life Church and the ULC Seminary. I'm also a Sacramento Wedding Minister and Disc Jockey
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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Rich Hale has a great take on simply being the highest ranking student in a room. On that idea, presenting a seminar simply reflects a specialty on your part. You may be "only" a second, but what if you're the regional expert on shaving toenail hair? People interested in toenail hair shaving will have to come to you for that bump in information, regardless of the rank on your waist.

    Internal Modeling skills -- checking in with your inner wisdom on how to do something better within the constraints of your own neuro-mechanical physiology -- is a pet thing of mine, and I'd bet a hundred bucks I could offer valuable info on that same thing to much more experienced kenpo folk than I; I could help you improve on your game, regardless of rank and skill.

    So, what is it you do first, better, of different than the other wildebeast in the herd? That's your seminar topic. You don't have to be perfect or supreme at it to be qualified; just the most qualified student in the room.

    D.
    Clear mind, clear movement. Mastery of the Arts is mastery over the Self. That in this moment, this motion, the thoughts, memories, impulses and passions that cloud the mind must yield to the clarity of purpose, and purity of motion.

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Dave in da house View Post

    So, what is it you do first, better, of different than the other wildebeast in the herd? That's your seminar topic. You don't have to be perfect or supreme at it to be qualified; just the most qualified student in the room.

    D.
    I'm better at teaching the enneagram than anyone in most rooms, but that has nothing to do with kenpo. lol.

    I guess that's the issue. I don't feel the most qualified in any particular topic. I've always been a jack of all trades. In track, I got a trophy for 'most all around'. At least third best in all the events, but not #1 at any of them.

    I'll have to give it more thought.

    Thanks.
    The New Kenpo Continuum Book is now accepting submissions for volume 2. Our fabulous, ever-changing website is Sacramento Kenpo Karate.
    I'm a member of the Universal Life Church and the ULC Seminary. I'm also a Sacramento Wedding Minister and Disc Jockey
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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Most often it will be in an area you enjoy the most. I love trapping. If I were to do a class it would probably be on trapping and include some of my favorite drills. I'm not the best, but it's an area I like. Know what I mean?
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." Charles A. Beard

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    I've taught a class to those outside my own association before, but not a "seminar" so much. Regardless, I was invited to teach a group unfamiliar with what we do (in fact, unfamiliar with much of AK as we all know it), and so in my mind the approach was the same as a seminar. My thoughts below also come from those seminars I have attended and have gained the most information.

    1) Teach things that have broad application. If teaching techniques, focus on "why" something is done a particular way, this is akin to teaching a concept. Teaching someone a little more than a pattern is among the lowest forms of instruction. Typically, it has been my experience that the better the instructor (note, that does not mean the higher the rank), the more axiomatic the lesson.

    2) KISS. Keep it simple. Its like playing live music for an audience; better to have them wanting more than to give them indigestion. Allow those that are hungrier and can digest more to ask questions.

    3) Be able to teach to multiple levels. The best teachers I've seen can teach one thing and have it truly useful for all ranks.

    4) Make them understand the reasons why something works. Make them not only feel it, but make them be able to execute it. Even if its something different than what they do, they can get a very clean picture of the distinction, and if nothing else can gain greater appreciation for their own if indeed they stick with it and discard yours.

    5) Be lenient and understanding. Don't expect a good neutral bow out of a Shotokan guy, or knife work from a capaoerista. They may be a fish out of water, put yourself in their shoes, you might be just as clueless in their school.

    6) Give them specific methods of practicing what they've learned. Nothing is more useless than information that can't be retained and used. Its a waste of time, money, and effort on both your parts.

    7) Don't stand on a pedestal. I've taught things to people that could wipe the floor with me, but were humble and open enough to learn something that could make them better. Don't judge the book by its cover, and learn from them as much as they learn from you, to whatever extent possible. Any differences in methodologies should make you understand your own craft that much better.

    Great topic, look forward to more.

    Cheers,

    Steven Brown
    UKF

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by bujuts View Post

    3) Be able to teach to multiple levels. The best teachers I've seen can teach one thing and have it truly useful for all ranks.

    5) Be lenient and understanding. Don't expect a good neutral bow out of a Shotokan guy, or knife work from a capaoerista. They may be a fish out of water, put yourself in their shoes, you might be just as clueless in their school.

    Cheers,

    Steven Brown
    UKF
    Amy,

    Mr. Brown pointed out some great points.

    When someone ask you a question, they may or may not be challanging you, and you may or may not know the answer.Dont feel that you have to answer every question. Respond with (Hey thats a great question, what do you think) then wait for their answer. Afterwards respond with ( I never thought of it like that, thank you) This will disarm them.

    Also know that your confidence will show. The anticipation of the event is the problem. Once you get started its just another class, and you will do fine.

    I dont like for people to choose my seminar topics for me. I prefer to go in with an ideal topic and let the flow of the seminar dictate its self. I very rarely finsh the seminar with the topic I thought I would teach.

    We all have to start somewhere for those who wish to teach seminars.
    The time will come when those who teach seminars now no longer will, so the question becomes who will?

    I must also warn you, placing yourself under the microscope for public disection is at times painfull.

    Here is my main piece of advice for you.

    Make sure you spend personel time with each person, sharing something with them. The rest of the seminar will be a blur of demonstrations which will be only partialy remembered. But that personel time and information you share with each person will be engrained.

    My Respects
    Your Brother
    Brad Marshall SP
    KKFI

    trgodbm@yahoo.com

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Greetings Amy.

    You're over thinking.

    If you teach classes, you're giving mini seminars every day.

    A seminar or workshop tends to be a specialized, longer class.

    You could for example, use the Web of Knowledge to your advantage. Choose a category, and go through the details and considerations of the nature of the attack.

    You could do seminars on just one technique, and all the implications of the movements it teaches and the skills it teaches.

    You could identify something that is weak in your students performance, and work on drills to increase those attributes.

    You could ask your students on topics that they would want to work on and go from there...

    you could hijack a topic from the forum and expand it and do the drills suggested here by the posters...

    or you could sit around and do nothing while you decide which black belt rank "degree" qualifies you to teach.

    To me, no rank qualifies me. Only me and my skills.

    Juan M. Mercado

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by bujuts View Post
    I've taught a class to those outside my own association before, but not a "seminar" so much. Regardless, I was invited to teach a group unfamiliar with what we do (in fact, unfamiliar with much of AK as we all know it), and so in my mind the approach was the same as a seminar. My thoughts below also come from those seminars I have attended and have gained the most information.

    1) Teach things that have broad application. If teaching techniques, focus on "why" something is done a particular way, this is akin to teaching a concept. Teaching someone a little more than a pattern is among the lowest forms of instruction. Typically, it has been my experience that the better the instructor (note, that does not mean the higher the rank), the more axiomatic the lesson.

    2) KISS. Keep it simple. Its like playing live music for an audience; better to have them wanting more than to give them indigestion. Allow those that are hungrier and can digest more to ask questions.

    3) Be able to teach to multiple levels. The best teachers I've seen can teach one thing and have it truly useful for all ranks.

    4) Make them understand the reasons why something works. Make them not only feel it, but make them be able to execute it. Even if its something different than what they do, they can get a very clean picture of the distinction, and if nothing else can gain greater appreciation for their own if indeed they stick with it and discard yours.

    5) Be lenient and understanding. Don't expect a good neutral bow out of a Shotokan guy, or knife work from a capaoerista. They may be a fish out of water, put yourself in their shoes, you might be just as clueless in their school.

    6) Give them specific methods of practicing what they've learned. Nothing is more useless than information that can't be retained and used. Its a waste of time, money, and effort on both your parts.

    7) Don't stand on a pedestal. I've taught things to people that could wipe the floor with me, but were humble and open enough to learn something that could make them better. Don't judge the book by its cover, and learn from them as much as they learn from you, to whatever extent possible. Any differences in methodologies should make you understand your own craft that much better.

    Great topic, look forward to more.

    Cheers,

    Steven Brown
    UKF
    Excellent advice! Copy this post and put it in your Kenpo notebook (which every wise Kenpoist has).

    Respects,
    Bill Parsons
    Triangle Kenpo Institute
    www.trianglekenpo.com

    "I know Kenpo!" "Cool... do you know how to use it?"

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Great advice. It gives me something to think about.


    It's not like I have any seminars coming up or anything, but I don't like the idea of putting limitations on myself thinking that I can't.

    I have, admittedly gone to seminars where I was thinking the material was more geared towards yellow and orange belts and was sorry I'd spent my money on it. I would hate to be a presenter like that.

    I've been to others where we worked yellow material, but in a really interesting way (so it's not the level of material, obviously).

    I'm sure that it's like most things that once I've done a few that it gets easier.

    Keep the suggestions coming. This is very interesting to me. Thanks.

    --Amy
    The New Kenpo Continuum Book is now accepting submissions for volume 2. Our fabulous, ever-changing website is Sacramento Kenpo Karate.
    I'm a member of the Universal Life Church and the ULC Seminary. I'm also a Sacramento Wedding Minister and Disc Jockey
    New Cool (free) kenpo tool bar: http://KenpoKarate.OurToolbar.com/


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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    You could go outside kenpo and bring things in, if you have the appropriate experience. Perhaps you have training in another art, and you feel some of the material, or the principles that art incorporates makes for a good match with kenpo. Bring in those ideas and work with them, applying them to kenpo techs, or something. Give them something unusual and unique, that most kenpoists have not seen or thought about, if they don't have experience outside the system.
    Michael


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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by amylong View Post
    I've never taught a seminar before.

    For those of you who have, how do you decide on a topic?

    At what rank did you start teaching them?

    Being that I'm only a second, I don't feel that I have enough mastery of a specific area that is unique enough to teach a seminar on. Know what I mean?

    Maybe I'm over-thinking it. I don't know.

    Tell me of your experiences.

    --Amy
    Well,

    It's pretty easy.

    You do teach groups and all group classes need a lesson plan, do they not?

    And most groups are 1-2 hours long right?

    And in the group, you have the time segments divided up to what you teach first, what you teach second, etc, right?

    And you make sure that you have much extra stuff, right?

    Then you be damn sure you cover the 4 IMPORTANT areas of what, why, how and what else, right? (I've already posted about these previously).

    They you find a topic that you know they want to learn more about...

    ...then you research the hell out of it, by looking at your notes, at other people's videos you've bought, at other resource materials.

    And you built your presentation.

    Getting the stories you need to validate your points, to prove your points, to keep their interests...

    ...and you write down the plan and work the plan.

    In fact, giving a damn good seminar is fairly easy.

    Dr. John M. La Tourrette

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by profesormental View Post
    you could hijack a topic from the forum and expand it and do the drills suggested here by the posters...
    Interestingly my last product for sale to the general public came off of a question a man on this forum asked.

    So in answering his question I literally "accidentally" came up with 3 DVD's and a 107 page manual.

    And it was a simple question about 11 words long.

    It did trigger my "knowledge base" so I made it into a product.

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by MARSHALLS KENPO View Post
    I dont like for people to choose my seminar topics for me. I prefer to go in with an ideal topic and let the flow of the seminar dictate its self. I very rarely finsh the seminar with the topic I thought I would teach.
    Unfortunately, that does destroy any marketing attempts you make.

    So, because it normally does end up like Mr. Marshall said, I make damn sure that on my 3 day events, that by the end of day one I'VE COVERED IN COMPLETE DETAILS everything mentioned in my advertising copy.

    So that I can then do the last 2 days of the intensive covering all the other neat stuff that pops up out of their unconscious minds that also need to be taken care of.

    That way the attendees are getting 3 TIMES the amount they paid for.

    Dr. John M. La Tourrette

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by amylong View Post
    I'm better at teaching the enneagram than anyone in most rooms, but that has nothing to do with kenpo. lol.
    You are wrong.

    the enneagram "can" and "does" have much to do with kenpo karate.

    Go to the personality side, and notice which profiles do what in the martial arts.

    Teach how to turn those other parts on and why it is (or can be) necessary for learning kenpo more effectively.

    One of my most powerful kenpo seminars was on "Secrets of Speed Reading the Opposition", which they did love, and still love today 20 years later.

    Dr John M. La Tourrette

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by John M. La Tourrette View Post
    Unfortunately, that does destroy any marketing attempts you make.

    So, because it normally does end up like Mr. Marshall said, I make damn sure that on my 3 day events, that by the end of day one I'VE COVERED IN COMPLETE DETAILS everything mentioned in my advertising copy.

    So that I can then do the last 2 days of the intensive covering all the other neat stuff that pops up out of their unconscious minds that also need to be taken care of.

    That way the attendees are getting 3 TIMES the amount they paid for.

    Dr. John M. La Tourrette
    Yes Sir your right about the marketing aspect.
    However I havent been asked to do a 3 day event (YET), nor has anyone requested any of my material (Which I dont have to market anyway).
    Im just someone in Nebraska doing a little Kenpo.
    Brad Marshall SP
    KKFI

    trgodbm@yahoo.com

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Amy, you'll do well. You know what you're doing. You may be a "second", but you know a lot more. It's obvious-so just do your thing.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Michael Huffman
    1st Black, AKKI
    www.akki.com

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by MARSHALLS KENPO View Post
    Yes Sir your right about the marketing aspect.
    However I havent been asked to do a 3 day event (YET), nor has anyone requested any of my material (Which I dont have to market anyway).
    Im just someone in Nebraska doing a little Kenpo.
    Do NOT talk yourself down Mr. Marshall.

    And NEITHER should Amy talk herself down.

    Ask the magic question, the question that leads to POSSIBILITIES, "If I could do a GREAT seminar, what could I give it on that THEY would really enjoy?"

    And it's nice to do this self-questioning at a meditative alpha level so you actually get positive answers popping up.

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Quote Originally Posted by John M. La Tourrette View Post
    Do NOT talk yourself down Mr. Marshall.

    And NEITHER should Amy talk herself down.

    Ask the magic question, the question that leads to POSSIBILITIES, "If I could do a GREAT seminar, what could I give it on that THEY would really enjoy?"

    And it's nice to do this self-questioning at a meditative alpha level so you actually get positive answers popping up.
    Dr. John,

    Sir I thank you for that response.
    I just look at this way, I have some wonderful insight to share, the hardest part is getting publicly known in-order to have a market base which to promote the material to. It takes many many years before the public is willing to listen,or validate what is being promoted. If you think about it, very few here on this site, didnt even know who I was prior to my posting.

    So I continue to teach,train,study,and listen to those who are well known.
    This helps me in my teaching and study, and someday in the promotional aspects of the art to a larger base.

    My Respect Sir, and again Thank you
    Brad Marshall SP
    KKFI

    trgodbm@yahoo.com

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Hi Amy,

    Try starting small and working your way up. In the past two months, this board alone there have been announcements for four Kenpo-related get-togethers that I can think of. The KenpoTalk meet and Greet, Dr. Dave's Kenpo Ohana, East Coast Kenpo Systems event in Canada, then there's an upcoming Kenpo Ohana in Texas.

    Try networking with the people that taught at these events. Find out what they did in what kind of time. See if you can open doors to teach yourself at a future gathering.

    The only one of those that I attended was the Kenpo Talk Meet and Greet. Mr. Jay Arnold was the only one that taught Kenpo, and he went over Sword of Destruction with the group. The event in Buffalo attracted over 30 people, and the attendees were from New York State, but also as far away as Ohio, West Virginia, Massachusetts, and even Texas. There are a lot of camps and seminars that don't attract that number of people, let alone from that wide of a spread. Working such events could go a long way to start building up your base.

    Anyway...that's just an idea. Just be sure to let me know if you make it out towards Boston

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    Default Re: Teaching Seminars

    Teaching is an art form and teaching seminars is an art form unto itself. The easiest way to know you are ready to teach seminars, is to wait until you are asked by those you respect in the Martial Arts community. When your peers respect your teaching ability enough to ask you to teach a seminar then you are ready to do so.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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