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Thread: Principles: Neutral Zones of Defense

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    Default Principles: Neutral Zones of Defense

    As Defined by The Encycolpedia of Kenpo:

    Neutral Zones of Defense: These areas are literally zones where one can find momentary sanctuary. They are synonymously referred to as zones of sanctuary. These zones can be found in the corners of a square that engulfs a circle. The theory works on the premise that when an opponent attacks you using a circular motion (delivered vertically, diagonally, or horizontally) you are to take sanctuary in the corners of an imaginary square where the zones are neutral because circular moves cannot make contact with the corners of the squeare that engulfs it.




    Open to discuss how it's applied in different techniques, sets etc....
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    Default Re: Principles: Neutral Zones of Defense

    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Crippler View Post
    Neutral Zones of Defense: These areas are literally zones where one can find momentary sanctuary. ... These zones can be found in the corners of a square that engulfs a circle ...
    They can also be found inside the arc the attack describes, above, below, or tangential to it. Look at Checking the Storm (recently discussed). You move inside and above the arc of the bludgeon to a zone of sanctuary. Also noted in that discussion was the fact that the nature of the weapon and the strike contributed to creating that zone, as it is not easily redirected.

    Tangential would be moving back, or yielding, so that the force of the strike is disipated. Taiji and FMA's use this a lot, and it is in a lot of our techs as well.

    Dan C

    P.S. You need a white dot at the center of your circle, and it should change to grey and get darker the closer it gets to the outer rim, which is black. The white outside the outer rim is ok. To really make it accurate, you'd have to define a segment of the circle, with arrows, and draw the triangles and shade them and put in the tangents... you know what, just get a universal pattern and contemplate this awhile.
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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