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Thread: Distance Learning

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    Default Distance Learning

    Greetings,
    This is my very first post on this thread so, I'll get right to the point.
    I have no kenpo schools anywhere near me.
    I have noticed that "Distance Learning" is available from many different Kenpo systems. I have no experience with Kenpo and wonder how effectively a person could learn the art via video delivery and sending in "testings" that have been recorded to video.

    Has any of the very kind, active members of this forum ever utilized distance learning to develop proficiency in Kenpo? If so, I have a few questions that you might be so kind as to answer:

    1. Whose system did you use?
    2. What problems, if any, did you experience attempting to lean this way?
    3. What rank did you attain using distance learning
    4. Any other information that would help me make an informed decision about utilizing this method for learning would be very much appreciated.

    God bless and thank everyone for their time and consideration.

    ~Sandra

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by sandrar View Post
    I have no kenpo schools anywhere near me.
    I have noticed that "Distance Learning" is available from many different Kenpo systems. I have no experience with Kenpo and wonder how effectively a person could learn the art via video delivery and sending in "testings" that have been recorded to video.
    I don't do a video course, but I've gotten most of my training by traveling to private lessons supplimented by a lot of videos. So maybe I can give some feedback.

    1. Whose system did you use?
    2. What problems, if any, did you experience attempting to lean this way?
    3. What rank did you attain using distance learning
    4. Any other information that would help me make an informed decision about utilizing this method for learning would be very much appreciated.
    1. I have videos fropm several different sources. The ones that seem to me to be the best for distance learning are the IKCA/Karate Connection videos. It's based on EPAK, though not strictly American Kenpo. But clear, well done and driven by principles and concepts. If I were to do strictly video training, this would be my choice.

    2. Biggest problem, bar none, is going to be partners. No matter how you slice it, you need at least two dedicated partners to make this work. You can count yourself lucky if you can hang on to one for more than a few months.

    3. I don't do (or care about) rank. White is rite, when it comes to belts. But there are several (including the IKCA) that will take you to black.

    4. Just be ready for a long, tough haul. It takes considerably moe dedication to do this by video than by attending classes. And it is frustrating to get so many people to try it, then see them leave to sit back in front of the tube about the time you get them into a good neutral bow. You'll also take a lot of crap from self important types that don't like the way you train. But, if you really love it, it's worth it (well, mostly).

    I'd seriously recomend you look at other schools in your area, even if they aren't Kenpo, and see if there's something that you would like and that is effective (AK isn't the only effective system, by a long shot). But, if there isn't, or if you've just got your heart set on Kenpo, then by all means, go for it! And the contacts you made looking around should be maintained, if possible. Let them know you are interested in their seminars. Many beg for attendees so they can pay the costs, and will gladly notify you. You'll also need sparing and workout partners, from time to time. Some have very generouse walk-in policies and fees.

    I wish you luck, whatever you end up doing.

    Dan C
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Hey There,

    I think the Distance Learning debate is a very good one and i'm sure it will be an ongoing one as the technology and people get use to learning in this way. To start with i would like to say that it can be a very valid way of learning but there can be pitfalls also. In academic study a lot of universities and colleges are now offering more and more Distance Learning courses to help the student who may have problems with location or full-time classroom study. I also know of in the UK sport and fitness courses who offer this and do it very well with professional qualification at the end of the course. Although with this said you do have to visit the departments a few times throughout the course for individual exams or study. I think this gives a good mix of feedback and help. Plus if you are serious abut your training you should want to visit a few times to see how you and others are progressing.

    Of course there as been a lot of development, research and thought that has gone it to these distance learning courses. I would like to think that it can be done with Martial Arts also. But i will also state that i don't think it is possible to study completely all on your own. Even on these courses i have mentioned above you still get the contact with your fellow students to interact with for that extra help.

    This also leads me onto how well the distance learning course is run. It needs to be professional and everything in place before starting. I have lectured to students in university via distance learning and i have also studied in this way when i did my MA Degree. There are pros and cons to this way of learning just as there are in the dojo/club.

    I would say that a good mix of important factors to distance learning would be....

    * A Sound and easy to understand syllabus and training material.

    * Excellent feedback and input from your instructor.

    * A set number of days or times that you know you can contact your instructor for feeback and help.

    * Contact with other students on the course to help one another and give a friendly group learning environment.

    * A few training partners to practice the moves that are not possible on your own.

    * Dedication, will power and a want to learn.

    * A log or blog so you and your instructor can see the progress in your learning.

    * A good mix of theory and practical to balence the students learning.

    At the moment i do not know how current instuctors run their distance learning course but however they do it they need to think of it as just another way to help and teach a student to learn, not an easy fast way to make some money.

    As i have said already there are many pitfalls to this method of learning and training so you need to be totally dedicated to how you approach your new study. And i would adivse that you still attend as many seminars or events as you can to develop you training. Plus it's always nice to see what other people are doing and have some human interaction. If you have no one to train with it can be lonely and it can cause you to give up.

    Hope this helps in some way.

    Mark
    UK-Kenpo

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Thanks for the excellent input. Consideration is very much appreciated. Does anyone else have anything to add? I'm hoping that someone has put some time into distance learning for martial arts training and can give me first-hand input.

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Try this for more info:

    Video/DVD Lessons

    It's a long thread on video learning. There are some well thought out posts by people more senior than me who disagree with my view, some that agree, and a little of the attitude I mentioned.

    Theres a link to the IKCA web site in there somewhere, too.

    You might PM Celtic Crippler, KatsudoKarate, or bdparsons for info as well.

    Dan C
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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    Smile Re: Distance Learning

    Hi Again,

    I have been writing an article on distance learning and the Martial Arts but i don't want to publish it just yet because it's not finished. But when i do this forum will be the first place to read it.

    To finish it i need to complete the final part, this will consist of me actual undergoing the training in the distance learning program format. It will be a personal experiment but i will make the experience public for all to read. Who knows how it will go! but i think it will be interesting to see how it goes.

    Stay in touch because i'm going to be setting up a web site if people want to find out more.

    Mark

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    The "Distance Learning" debate is a heated and long lived argument. I can see different sides to the issue, but over all I've got to say that I'm against it. NOT as in "Don't Do it"....but I don't think you can get anywhere Near the level of understanding and competency that you could with the immediate feedback and observation of a knoweldgeable instructor.

    JUST my opinion.
    IF you go for it though, GO ALL OUT. Get every DVD, read every book/magazine, come to KENPOTALK a lot and ask ask ask ask ask questions.

    BTW: Where do you live? Reason I ask, you may be AMAZED to find out that there's Kenpoists near you. MAYBE not a Black Belt, but maybe someone with some experience that can get you nearer the mark than with no instruction at all.
    So please, if you don't mind....let us know your Country/State/City...
    I myself, and probably many others, would LOVE to try to help you out.


    and by the way: WELCOME to KenpoTalk!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Enjoy

    Your Brother
    John
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    "Striving for success without hard work is like trying to harvest where you haven't planted"
    ~ David Bly

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by sandrar View Post
    Greetings,
    This is my very first post on this thread so, I'll get right to the point.
    I have no kenpo schools anywhere near me.
    I have noticed that "Distance Learning" is available from many different Kenpo systems. I have no experience with Kenpo and wonder how effectively a person could learn the art via video delivery and sending in "testings" that have been recorded to video.

    Has any of the very kind, active members of this forum ever utilized distance learning to develop proficiency in Kenpo? If so, I have a few questions that you might be so kind as to answer:

    1. Whose system did you use?
    2. What problems, if any, did you experience attempting to lean this way?
    3. What rank did you attain using distance learning
    4. Any other information that would help me make an informed decision about utilizing this method for learning would be very much appreciated.

    God bless and thank everyone for their time and consideration.

    ~Sandra
    Sandra,

    I know that I travel all over the USA to teach students on a regular basis.
    If you ask a teacher to train you,and he/she agrees, then they will come to you. I am in Nebraska, and my teacher is in Ma.
    Brad Marshall SP
    KKFI

    trgodbm@yahoo.com

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother John View Post
    The "Distance Learning" debate is a heated and long lived argument. I can see different sides to the issue, but over all I've got to say that I'm against it. NOT as in "Don't Do it"....but I don't think you can get anywhere Near the level of understanding and competency that you could with the immediate feedback and observation of a knoweldgeable instructor.

    JUST my opinion.
    IF you go for it though, GO ALL OUT. Get every DVD, read every book/magazine, come to KENPOTALK a lot and ask ask ask ask ask questions.

    BTW: Where do you live? Reason I ask, you may be AMAZED to find out that there's Kenpoists near you. MAYBE not a Black Belt, but maybe someone with some experience that can get you nearer the mark than with no instruction at all.
    So please, if you don't mind....let us know your Country/State/City...
    I myself, and probably many others, would LOVE to try to help you out.


    and by the way: WELCOME to KenpoTalk!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Enjoy
    You are far too kind. I live in the hill country (central/south) of Texas.
    The town is called Kerrville. Here is a little background on what led me to this forum that may answer some of the questions of "why is this person asking about this?".

    My husband has trained in TKD and Karate in his youth and young(er) adulthood. Currently, he trains in Japanese style Jujitsu, is the senior student and has been in that system for over 4 years now. His instructor asked him to run a school in a neighboring town even though he is only 4th kyu. We've been running a mildly successful program for about 3 months now. We tend to draw the adult crowd more than the children. The problem is that my husband is only a blue belt after 4 years in this system. This may be more of a personal perception issue but, we've been scoffed at a time or two by people who are looking to learn from a black belt.

    He is frustrated because his instructor is not training him at his belt level. Consequenlty, he is not learning anything new. He's just the assistant instructor helping teach the lower ranks. He was looking to associate himself with another Jujitsu organization from the East Coast and was introduced to a gentleman to encouraged him to consider Kenpo distance learning as a viable option for someone who has several years worth of training. This is the "learn the material and send in a tape demonstrating your proficiency" type program.

    My husband has some trepidations but, I think that it's a great idea as he already has learned "how to learn" through the many years of experience that he has already.

    My husband will continue in the jujitsu program and we will continue teaching the classes (as well as me and our children) as long as we are turning enough of a profit to keep the doors open. I just think he would be better respected to have a legitmate black belt and a broader range of experience.

    Currently, there is no one that teaches Kenpo anywhere near us. The closest location is in San Antonio which is more than 75 miles away. It is a Jeff Speakman school. Gas is bad enough driving to and from the next town to teach.

    A lot of information, I know. But, since everyone is so kind and willing to be helpful, I felt that it would be good to give a better prespecive in the matter.

    Thank you for your time, input and consideration,

    ~Sandra

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by sandrar View Post
    Greetings,
    This is my very first post on this thread so, I'll get right to the point.
    I have no kenpo schools anywhere near me.
    I have noticed that "Distance Learning" is available from many different Kenpo systems. I have no experience with Kenpo and wonder how effectively a person could learn the art via video delivery and sending in "testings" that have been recorded to video.
    Hi Sandra,

    Here is my tale of distance learning.

    I am/was a black belt in kenpo, and had done a smattering of unarmed arts in the past, and had acheived intermediate ranks in three other arts. I'm just pointing out that I wasn't a newbie to martial arts. Also, I am a visual learner, so video references seemed right up my alley (and they are, I have a huge video library). My two training partners were also black belts in kenpo, one was a visual learner, the other a kinesthetic. Two of us could be considered "naturals" to martial arts, and the third an average learner, it was a good training group.

    So anyway, we wanted to learned some Filipino martial arts, we live in BFE Wyoming and the closest instructor was in Salt Lake City, about three hours away in good weather. So we went with a video learning program, eventually hooking up with a video training program that you tested by sending in your test on tape, and you could do an email Q&A session whenever necessary. We worked at this for about a year and half. We had two visual learners so we figured out the drill/tech from video and then the kinesthetic guy would learn it by doing the drill/tech with us, he was largely incapable of pulling the drills from video. At about a year and a half, we gave it up, the group consensus was that something very important was missing, and that this training wasn't translating into real world skills. So we looked up an instructor in SLC, and started travelling. We learned more in 6 months of 1x month private lessons and a weekend seminar than we had learned in the previous 1.5 years. So for me that weighs heavily on the "go with a teacher" route.

    As a student of Brazilian jiu-jitsu in the mid-nineties, there wasn't alot of qualified instruction out there. I was learning from a blue belt, and lots of guys were learning off video. When you rolled with a tape trainer you could tell, they weren't as technical and there were never as "tight" as the feel of rolling with our school, much less rolling with guys coming from the Brazilian or established Cali acadamies.

    Finally, as a student of kenpo, I have run into a number of guys taught through one of the more popular kenpo video training courses out there. This was largely through tournaments, but I visited at least two schools. The tournament guys lasted one tournament and then we never saw them again, largely because they got smoked in every division they entered, and there was something like 4 first blacks from that school competing. This was from an established school with a head instructor that taught the video curricullum. Tournament karate doesn't mean much, but I wasn't real impressed. I visited two schools that offered that same material and at best came out with mixed feelings about the material.

    Ed Parker has a quote that goes something like; "to hear is to doubt, to see is to be deceived, but to feel is to believe." I now use video largely as a reference tool for what I already know. I watch Larry Tatum's and Huk Planas' tapes to see what and why they do things differently than I do. I watch the video of my private lessons to review what I learned, and make sure I am practicing it correctly. I won't say I never lift things from video, I do all the time, but not as a tool of primary instruction. My experience with video instruction has been poor enough that I am extremely skeptical of the options out there. My consistent advice to students who leave us and go elsewhere is "don't worry about the style, just find the best instructor in your area."

    Lamont

    BTW: Welcome to KenpoTalk!
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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by sandrar View Post
    Currently, there is no one that teaches Kenpo anywhere near us. The closest location is in San Antonio which is more than 75 miles away. It is a Jeff Speakman school. Gas is bad enough driving to and from the next town to teach.
    here's my thoughts on this. The Jeff Speakman program has a good set of DVDs out there and is a well supported group. Their system appears to be jujistu influenced as well - there are ground techniques and submissions that are taught in there. So this may be a good system for you/your husband to distance train in because there could already be similarities to what he is learning. So his jujitsu will help his kenpo-training, and his kenpo-training will help his jujitsu because they will complement each other.

    If you set aside only one evening every month to travel there it'd be worth it. Just once a month to 'top up' and consolodate what you're learning from the DVDs. Its only 75 miles - whats that, an hour's drive? I used to travel 130 miles (each way) to my classes every week (still do but not as frequent these days) so I know whats possible when you put your mind to it...

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Things that require a body simply won't be available information to you until you have another person to train with. Contact manipulation (grappling and joint locks) will be largely meaningless unless you already have a basis to work from, so in my opinion your time is better spent on fundamentals. Find a good post or tree, wrap a rope around it, or wrap your hands, or get a heavy back, and simply work to understand your body and what it is to deliver power.

    Then ask questions, try to refine your hitting and stance work. Don't worry about techniques, worry about the physical experience of destroying something with your basic primary weapons. Experience will tell you what's working and what isn't. Then ask more questions, get some phone numbers, share your observations and dilemmas, and only take in small pieces of advice at a time.

    Until you can gain formal instruction, a strong core of aggressive and applied basics are what will save your bacon. Its about using your body. I promote such tutored self exploration of one's craft because it makes it their own - only you will know what muscle group is strained when you hit, only you will see how much the heavy bag moves, and in what direction.

    Kenpo is dominated by theory, but don't get too washed up in it. Explore the fundamentals and make them yours, later the rest will come easy and effective.

    cheers,

    Steven Brown
    Universal Kenpo Federation

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Why not a COMBINATION of what Mr Brown suggests, along WITH a good video learning system?

    Trying to 'learn on your own' is likely to be more counterproductive than incorporating what you can learn via an established video learning system, IMHO.

    Go get the IKCA orange belt video. Use that to learn the BASICS. Stances, blocks, strikes, kicks. They even have a section in there on how to make a striking dummy for use at home to work out with. Go over that tape THOROUGHLY...each time, review something different. First time, look at foot placement. Next, hand placement. Then look at what changes when you do the strikes...how do you move what to get the power.

    Then take that out to what Mr Brown suggests...that striking dummy they recommend, or a heavy bag, or some home made equivilant if you like. Learn to apply it that way. Learn to FEEL what works.

    Then go back to the tape again and work on the techniques. GET SOMEONE TO WORK WITH!!! Having a 'live body' to target on will improve your technique greatly.

    Using this, and using the feedback system in IKCA can get you a GREAT start into kenpo.

    Now...here's the problem. If the 'intent' of your request here is to get a black belt to make his ju-jitsu dojo seem more 'reputable' because he's wearing a black belt, I'd caution you against this. How can having a black belt in kenpo make you a better ju-jitsu instructor? Now, it COULD...but IMHO I don't see how this will improve your school situation.

    I think your husband would be better served by having a sit down conversation with his instructor. If his instructor ASKED HIM to start another school, then his instructor needs to TEACH him enough to run that school. I'm amazed that someone would ask a blue belt to start a school...this makes no sense to me. If I were in your husband's situation, I'd have a talk with that instructor about continuing to improve my OWN learning process before I'd consider attempting to open a school for him. Make sense?

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by sandrar
    My husband ... trains in Japanese style Jujitsu, ... His instructor asked him to run a school in a neighboring town even though he is only 4th kyu. ... we've been scoffed at a time or two by people who are looking to learn from a black belt. ... He is frustrated because his instructor is not training him at his belt level. Consequenlty, he is not learning anything new. He's just the assistant instructor helping teach the lower ranks. He was looking to associate himself with another Jujitsu organization from the East Coast and was introduced to a gentleman to encouraged him to consider Kenpo distance learning as a viable option for someone who has several years worth of training. This is the "learn the material and send in a tape demonstrating your proficiency" type program. ... I just think he would be better respected to have a legitmate black belt and a broader range of experience.

    Currently, there is no one that teaches Kenpo anywhere near us. The closest location is in San Antonio which is more than 75 miles away. It is a Jeff Speakman school. Gas is bad enough driving to and from the next town to teach.
    Lamont and James both gave some good advice. All I'll add is that, as you've seen yourself, you need to get some good one on one personal attention, no matter how you do it. Get to your systems seminars and events, or get to a school periodically. Like I said, to make it work you have to be dedicated and make sacrifices.

    This new information does change some things. First, I'd recomend you check out the school in San Antonio. I used to travel over 250 mi. (round trip) to private lessons from an instructor in Mr. Speakmans line, and the instruction was well worth the effort and gas. This was before the new 5.0 system, though, so I can't comment on that. But your husband should have enough experience to judge for himself the material and the quality of instruction there. If you can set up private lessons and get the DVD's to suppliment them, it could be your best bet. It won't be a quick way to a black belt, but then again, any system offering that is not worth it.

    One other bit of advice, though probably not necessary, is that when he (and/or you) get your rank in a different system, be absolutely clear about what you teach and at what level. I say this because I had a friend who was a blk blt in Okinawa-te and a brown in TKD. He taught in a TKD school, but wore his black belt while doing so, and almost caused the school to close when it was discovered. Didn't matter that it was because he was honest and told some students what his status was. Some took offense because they'd thought they were learning from a black belt in TKD. It was really intense for a while, with threats of legal action and a lot of hard feelings. So my advice is to put it right out front somehow so there's no question, and no way that anyone can miss it.

    You might try PMing KenpoJiujitsu3, or start a thread here about how well Kenpo and Jiujitsu work together. That could give you a better idea about whether you want to persue Kenpo as a second system.

    As for your Juitsu line, if your instructor is leaving you hang out like that, I'd say you are smart to look elsewhere. He should not only be giving your husband continuing training, but should periodically be down to help with the school as well. He needs to know how the students are being trained and clear up any problems or discrepencies in a timely manner. Any reputable head instructor would do that with a black belt operating a school in his line. To leave a blue belt hanging like that is not right. I don't know all the details, so won't be too hard on him. But I do know it isn't a good situation, regardless of the reasons.

    Again, I wish you luck.

    Dan C
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by bujuts View Post
    Things that require a body simply won't be available information to you until you have another person to train with. ... in my opinion your time is better spent on fundamentals. ... work to understand your body and what it is to deliver power. ... try to refine your hitting and stance work. Don't worry about techniques, worry about the physical experience of destroying something with your basic primary weapons. Experience will tell you what's working and what isn't. ... a strong core of aggressive and applied basics are what will save your bacon. Its about using your body. I promote such tutored self exploration of one's craft because it makes it their own - only you will know what muscle group is strained when you hit, only you will see how much the heavy bag moves, and in what direction.

    Kenpo is dominated by theory, but don't get too washed up in it. Explore the fundamentals and make them yours,
    Steven, that there's just good advice, I don't care who you are or how you study.

    Dan C
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    I appreciate it, Dan. Thanks. I think its important to keep things primal at times. I often ask myself what is really at my disposal? What will come out when my life is on the line, when fear, fatigue, chaos, and pain are seeking to envelop and destroy me. Often times in training a kenpoist will "do a technique", and back we go to "do another technique", the mind goes in and out of the fight, knowing what's coming, knowing what's next. But now put ourselves in that that puking-tired state, then add fear for our loved ones , confusion, loud noises, tunnel vision, and add two or more strong amped-up feel-no-pain attackers with knives and intent to kill, and you essentially have a worse case scenario. Regardless of anyone's rank or accomplishments, we should envision training for our worst nightmare. Gishin Funakoshi once said "train as though your life depends on it - one day it might."

    This is in my mind the primal state where only what we truly pound into our muscles comes out. Intellectualism is out the window. Raw survival. Its this state of being I evaluate my capacity to deliver kenpo in a true combative manner. When I look at it, I can count the things on ten fingers that I know 100% will come to battery for me: the neutral bow, the twist stance, the Sets, a few arm breaks, an erect carriage, etc. Its a pretty simple list compared, and for all intents and purposes and my own likelihood for getting into a deadly altercation, it may be all I need.

    So why all the training, then?

    I once took an advanced Calc course as part of my undergrad work. Jokingly, I asked the (very renowned) professor if we might higher lower level math students to do some of the tedious and monotonous algebra and computations for us. He wasn't joking when he answered "no". "Don't trust anything above simple algebra to anyone with less than a Bachelor's degree, anything above basic calculus to a Master's degree, and anything beyond that to anyone without a PhD". "True competency", he said, "requires a tremendous amount of over-training."

    Thanks for stirring my thoughts, Dan.

    Better living through hitting our friends,

    Steven Brown
    UKF
    Last edited by bujuts; 06-25-2007 at 03:12 PM.

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    uk-kenpo is offline
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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    I really liked your last post Bujuts. This got me thinking about the actual length of time a person trains in their Art before they start to teach. Because you related academic qualifications in your post i will continue from that reference. To teach professionally in the uk to high school level you would need to study for about 4 years, 3years of BA Degree and 1 year at Post grad level. Plus another few years of real life teaching experience.

    My point is, perhaps that these distance learning courses need to have a minium level entry to the course of Martial Arts qualification before they can be acepted on that course. e.g. 3 or 4 years. I know this won't help the total beginner but it will help students or (kenpo beginner) from other arts who can't train in real life clubs in their chosen style (kenpo).

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by uk-kenpo View Post
    My point is, perhaps that these distance learning courses need to have a minium level entry to the course of Martial Arts qualification before they can be acepted on that course. e.g. 3 or 4 years. I know this won't help the total beginner but it will help students or (kenpo beginner) from other arts who can't train in real life clubs in their chosen style (kenpo).
    uk-k, not sure if you mean the student or instructor would need three years experience. Either way, this would be impossible to enforce here in the colonies. I'd say an instructor, especially one heading a video course, should have considerably more time in than that. Sadly (though I'd be loath to change it legislatively) there's no way to stop someone with three months experience calling himself a Grand Master and selling video courses that guarantee black belt mastery in three weeks. There's a certain American Indian that will send you your tapes and your BB certificate in the mail for 1000 + dollars, because he just KNOWS you are going to do the work and learn it all! I don't like it, but what to do about it?

    By the way, what part of the UK? My wife was born in Derby and raised just up the lane from Nottingham Castle, and attended college in London. (when someone asks how she ended up here in the desert of Eastern Washington State, I just tell 'em 'I'm special', which really gets her going). I'm a misplaced Texan, but no one ever asks how or why I'm here. Go figure ...!


    Dan (special) C
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by sandrar View Post
    Greetings,
    This is my very first post on this thread so, I'll get right to the point.
    I have no kenpo schools anywhere near me.
    I have noticed that "Distance Learning" is available from many different Kenpo systems. I have no experience with Kenpo and wonder how effectively a person could learn the art via video delivery and sending in "testings" that have been recorded to video.

    Has any of the very kind, active members of this forum ever utilized distance learning to develop proficiency in Kenpo? If so, I have a few questions that you might be so kind as to answer:

    1. Whose system did you use?
    2. What problems, if any, did you experience attempting to lean this way?
    3. What rank did you attain using distance learning
    4. Any other information that would help me make an informed decision about utilizing this method for learning would be very much appreciated.

    God bless and thank everyone for their time and consideration.

    ~Sandra
    Sandra,

    Michale Billings is in Austin, he is a good guy,and a fine kenpo black belt.
    I lived in Austin for a while and have spent time at his school. Even a once a month visit to Austin is well worth the investment.
    Brad Marshall SP
    KKFI

    trgodbm@yahoo.com

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    Default Re: Distance Learning

    Quote Originally Posted by Brother John View Post
    The "Distance Learning" debate is a heated and long lived argument. I can see different sides to the issue, but over all I've got to say that I'm against it. NOT as in "Don't Do it"....but I don't think you can get anywhere Near the level of understanding and competency that you could with the immediate feedback and observation of a knoweldgeable instructor.

    JUST my opinion.
    IF you go for it though, GO ALL OUT. Get every DVD, read every book/magazine, come to KENPOTALK a lot and ask ask ask ask ask questions.
    I loved your honest, "well thought-out" answer.

    When a person has the choice between no trainer and video training, then video training WINS, hands down.

    When a person has the choice between "crap" training and good videos, then the good videos WIN hands down.

    Dr. John M. La Tourrette

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