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Thread: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

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    Default How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    A buddy and I were going over POSITIONAL RECOGNITION drills. He noted that, while teaching a class, he covered Grip of Death & Grasp of Death (theme being variations on side headlock escapes), then moved on to a transition from a Guillotine attempt that spares you being choked, but places you in a side headlock...from which either Grip or Grasp of Death would be appropriate. The class transitioned from the guillotine to this position, then froze...saying they didn't have anything from here, even though they covered it just 15 minutes earlier. They didn't recognize the opportunities the position presented.

    I thought back to a training method used at the Gracie Academy in Torrance. Once you had your basics and transitions down decently, sparring sessions would have limitations placed on them. Dude A can only go for a tap with an American Arm Bar; Dude B can only go for a submission from a Mounted Triangle. And so on. If I was dude A, I knew to prevent my ass from getting mounted or triangled, and he knew not to let me near that arm bar. So we'd wrestle like hell to obtain position to go for our respective finishes. Blocks, transitions, counters. And the whole time, seeing other opportunities for finishes that you weren't allowed to take. In a backwards way, it taught you to spot opportunites on the fly. You're so danged tired, that you wanna take whatever's closest, and not have to fight for your prescribed sub.

    So...What do you do to teach others positional awareness, and/or to develop and improve your own?

    Regards,

    Dave
    Clear mind, clear movement. Mastery of the Arts is mastery over the Self. That in this moment, this motion, the thoughts, memories, impulses and passions that cloud the mind must yield to the clarity of purpose, and purity of motion.

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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    Good topic!

    Slow sparing, especially starting from prescribed attacks.

    What if scenarios.

    Working out with other stylists who don't know the prescribed school attack by rote is another good way to have to improvise.

    Dan c
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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    don bohrer is offline
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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    Dave I think your on the right path already. As Dan mentioned the students need to work the same patterns until the light turns on. You might consider using the same groupings often and eventually they'll get it.

    don (el paso)
    Daffy, fighting with his $1.25 quarter staff : "Ho! Haha! Guard! Turn! Parry! Dodge! Spin! Ha! Thrust!" (quarter staff bounces off log, bending his beak. He straightens it back to normal, and starts speaking to himself) "Something's amiss here... hmm, let me run through it. Ho, haha, guard, turn, parry, dodge, spin, ha, thrust." (beak bends again) "Got it." (straightens beak, and starts his fighting moves again.) "Ho! Haha! Guard! Turn! Parry! Dodge! Spin!"

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    Juggernaut is offline
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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    Great topic,

    I utilize situational specific sparring a great deal when I teach and train. I also like to use what I call situational assault progressions. Take grasp of death for instance.

    If I were going to teach that to a student it would look like this.

    First learn the motions of the technique in the air.

    Second slowly step by step apply the technique to an uke.

    Third speed the technique up paying close attention to structural alignment, leverage, body unity, stance change, bracing angles and so on.

    Fourth do it with power and speed with the uke applying more resistance.

    Fifth is where the situational assualt progressions come in. The uke places you in the headlock and begins to move in any direction, he could be trying to ram your head into a wall, take you down, hold you for someone else to kick you, and so on. And you have to apply the technique with one or more of those varibles occuring. You both could be up against a wall facing away from it, toward it...etc. One step further to the drill would be to put on some protective gear with full resistance from the uke.

    I am not an instructor in Kenpo (yet) but the above is an example of how I would apply some ways that I teach my Combative Sciences classes to kenpo.

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    Anoise is offline
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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    When we practice techinques we are told to go beyond and think about , if not do, what might come next. Instead of just crossing out we keep going with different strikes and or kicks.
    When I spar I sometimes ask the person to stop and let me try something...or if he did something I thought worked and I wanted to try it, see what he did. Then look to do it again in regular sparring.

    There was a post about what intimidates you about Kenpo. One of my fears is figuring how to see and take advantage of openings in a real life situation without wasting time thinking about what I need to do. I look forward to reading responses to this thread

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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Dave in da house View Post
    So...What do you do to teach others positional awareness, and/or to develop and improve your own?
    Usually I throw them into sparring, I'll plum clinch the student, feed some knees see what they do, transition to side headlock and start punching them in the head (lightly, less lightly if its an upper belt). If they stand there just covering, I'll start yelling "don't you have a technique for this?" I also transition from the plum clinch to a single lapel grab (or just hold them around the neck) and then start punching with the other hand, if they just cover I'll remind them that they have a technique from there as well. I'll do the same with a trap into a cross-arm wrist grab, standing armbars, clinch to the sleeper (and its counters). Basically anything I can do to up the chaos factor and remove the sterility of the tech lines. Not all of the "techs" that I show are named techs, and many are counters to the kenpo techs like Crossing Talon or Sleeper. I'll also use double lapel grabs into shoulder throws if the person is wearing a decent gi.

    Not really a drill.

    Lamont

    Edit: My instructor does this to me too, but he doesn't give me any helpful hints, more like hit me until I figure out the the counter.
    Pekiti Tirsia Kali and Kenpo Karate
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    bujuts is offline
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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    Among other things, we make use of Sticky Hands, which is a culmination of the Sets within the system. This allows us to freely flow through the motions in the Sets and hit, manipulate, and break what we want to. It operates from a common matrix from which we do all of our motions witht the upper body. The lower body serves to take us where want, form the basis of our power, and to of course use its own weapons.

    I take this sort of training from two basic approaches. The questions "what do I want to do to him?", and "how do I get there from where I am now".

    An example:

    1. I'll Start with Delayed Sword.
    2. My decision is to gain clarity of my blind spot (roughly 3:00 to 8:00).
    3. I change to the the 10:30 / 4:30 line with my left foot as I pound the right respiratory meridian with a right hammer fist as I claw my right thumb into an eye.
    4. A move straight into the spinal column with a right foot (in a nuetral bow) and break the jaw with an elbow sandwich.
    5. A few of the alternatives available to me now are a) a kill (one move away), b) the end of Backbreaker (two moves away), a broken right collar bone (one move away), c) the V.O.B and left palm I heel I use in a second directional change in Fatal Deviation, d) a (very important) peripheral scan of ~7:30 to 2:30, etc.
    6. Since I'm after that 3:00 - 8:00 area that was previously unknown to me, I need to get in the positioning that orients my body roughly towards 6:00.
    7. Here I come to the lessons of positioning I learn in Captured Twigs. Keep control of his spine and head as you step up the circle with the left leg (bump his right leg with your right knee if you have to).
    8. Release his head and move it back with the left palm (still there from the elbow sandwich). Right snapping buckle to his left leg as you pound his genitals into his pelvis.
    9. I find out there's nobody there at 8:00. Better keep attacking him while I gain clarity of the other direction...

    In short, we take these drills slowly. Strategy (what we want to do in terms of the overall fight, directions, exits, etc.) dictates the course of the fight as I want it to occur. Tactics (basics and components of techniques - a buckle to drop height, a trap to prevent the draw of a weapon and isolate a limb) allow me to meet the objectives of the strategy. The Techniques teach me options for particular scenarios (not just dealing with particular attacks). Sticky Hands (utilized above in the transition of the hammer fist of Delayed Sword (Strike Set) to the elbow sandwich) teaches us to move through the motions contained in the Sets and manipulate limbs (while breaking, as necessary), from the enemy's inside to outside, outside to inside. The legs, again, form our power structure, and carry us to where we decide to go.

    Great topic, look forward to more.

    Steven Brown
    UKF

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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    If I told you, then "you" would know.
    Sean

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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan View Post
    Good topic!

    Slow sparing, especially starting from prescribed attacks.

    What if scenarios.

    Working out with other stylists who don't know the prescribed school attack by rote is another good way to have to improvise.

    Dan c
    Slow motion sparring is a great way to learn how to look for openings. Change that up a bit and don't allow any defense, so you can learn where you're opening yourself up.

    One of the drills I'll do is to put together a multiple attacker self defense technique based on input from the students. I'll give them an attack and will choose someone to give me a response. The response has to make sense. Then I'll show them what the result of the response is and have another student add on. It throws spontaneity into the mix and forces them to think about targets and opportunities just as much as it does technique.

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    Default Re: How do YOU train to recognize possibilities as they present?

    There's lots of things you can do to help a student be able to sense and use positional recognition, but essentially it's a way of seeing the technique. When a person gets stuck and can't think outside the "text-book" version of the technique...then they can't transition/graft from one point in tech-A to the corresponding point in tech-B.
    But once they can, their ability to adapt grows exponentially!

    I think that two person drills are also a great means of doing this. We do a drill that's a lot like a "Hubud" drill (a type of drill from the PMA systems, two person, highly repetitive, rapid response drills) in which you and your partner are exchanging up to 6 different types of strikes. You can do it in a certain order OR.....in order to gain a better sensitivity and ability to read an attackers body....vary their order up. That's the way I like it, uh-huh, uh-huh...
    Once they get this drill down solid, I like to throw things off again in two ways:
    #1: While doing SD-techs I challenge them to recognize the segment of the drill that deals with this type of attack, then splice the two together, so you're doing the initial response from the drill (catch & trap) then lead into the tech.
    #2: Do the drill it'self, but challenge the student to find ways to lead from one of the many traps that are in the drill....to a joint lock and take down.
    These two things get them to thinking outside the box.

    Getting someone outside of the 'text-book' version isn't for the novice! But once they get some time and experience under their colored belt....
    Go for it!
    Sometimes I just go through a technique and FREEZE them at a certain point and challenge them with; "What ELSE could you do from this point?" or "What other technique do you already know that you could move into from this point?"
    if they know, then the challenge becomes "How would that change the outcome?"

    GOOD topic!!!

    Your Brother
    John
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