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Thread: Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

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    Medina Kenpo Guest

    Default Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

    I have noticed in some threads that people recommend doing forms and techniques isometrically. I have not actually tried this but I would guess it would make you pretty tired. Do you keep low stances to stress your legs and tense your entire upper body while doing movements with your arms? I'm curious how people approach this and what benefits you see in it.

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    Empty Hand is offline
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    Default Re: Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

    Quote Originally Posted by Medina Kenpo
    I have noticed in some threads that people recommend doing forms and techniques isometrically. I have not actually tried this but I would guess it would make you pretty tired. Do you keep low stances to stress your legs and tense your entire upper body while doing movements with your arms? I'm curious how people approach this and what benefits you see in it.
    Hello Medina Kenpo

    I have practiced doing basic punches and kicks isometrically. What it does is create resistance. It helps build strength and speed. the only thing is when doing isometrics you must be careful not to try and go to fast because you could pull a muscle. It does take some getting used to. I hope this helps.

    Empty Hand

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    Default Re: Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

    Quote Originally Posted by Medina Kenpo
    I have noticed in some threads that people recommend doing forms and techniques isometrically.

    It may be because I'm a novice, but how I practice a technique in the dojo is probably how I'll execute a technique (or graft) on the street.

    I believe SGM Ed Parker said it best.... "I'd rather have 10 techniques I can fight with than 100 techniques that fight me"

    In addition, when I use weights (ex... 12 oz. Molson), I use the full range of motion, from my side all the way to my mouth and back to my side, then repeat. I wouldn't want to get muscle bound from the "Rising Molson to the Sun" technique or from doing Long One.

    What have I learned from this???

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    Default Re: Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

    I don't think isometric forms would give you any thing rather than isometric thinking, remember train as you figth, figth as you train. If you keep this in mind, while slow and tense movement show's you brain muscle strength it migth been teach your subcouncious static thinking thats developed static reaction, rather than fluid and consecuently movements.

    Just and advice from a master, I will go with a book next year abaout realistic teaching over self defense, wait for it.

    Att. ricsanabria

    5th degree Black belt

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    Randy Strausbaugh is offline
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    Default Re: Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

    Occasionally doing forms isometrically won't hurt if you make them a small part of your practice rather than the main focus.

    It also helps to (now and then) do Kenpo forms at Taijiquan speed. Really points out glitches in balance and alignment.

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    Default Re: Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

    I tend to agree that it is better to stay fluid but that there are advances to doing you forms slow and careful at times.

    Iím presently recovering from arm surgery do to an injury and Iím forced to do eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeverything slow.

    Mr. Paul Mills gave some great advice. He said I should concentrate on the micro precision movements of my kenpo. Going slow and really concentrating on every little movement that you can. It has been very eye opening.

    I think that this set back has had its advantages when it comes to the accurateness of my kenpo mechanics.



    Yours in Kenpo,

    Mike Guercio

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    Default Re: Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

    this is an interesting topic that needs reviving.
    i think the term "isometric" is being misused here though.
    an isometric exercise causes muscle contraction but the muscle does not shorten so there is no movement.
    a good example of an isometric exercise would be standing in a horse stance for 25 minutes, or until you could no longer hold the posture.
    isometric exercises are excellent for increasing explosive power through strengthening the fast twitch muscle fibre which normally isnt called into play during an isotonic exercise.
    ive also found that holding your stances like this really locks it into "muscle memory", so that it can be found easier during dynamic movement.
    my first instructor used to work us like dogs for an hour and then he would get us to stand in various postures until it was impossible to stay there.......the time you remain gradually increases, until it becomes relatively easy to get "locked" into a stable and strong position.

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    Default Re: Doing Techniques/Forms Isometrically

    I often do forms and techniques isometrically. It can really help your training. by going slowly and resisting you you prolong each action which makes muscle memory even easier. You also have time to analyze your every action so you can find faults in your motion.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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