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Thread: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

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    Default A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Where to start with this, I have a few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions. Keep in mind I have only been in Kenpo well this is my 9th month of training so some of my questions may be very common but I am new and only way I will learn is to ask. Some of these questions and or comments I do not wish to ask my instructor because I would never want to give him the impression that I am not happy with Kenpo or with the way he teaches some aspects of Kenpo. I plan to stick around in his school as long as he will have me and I am hoping that will prove to be many years.

    I guess my first question is what do you think is the most affective and practical kick for street use be it a Kenpo style kick or otherwise. In my limited experience of martial arts it is my opinion that there are three. The front snap kick, the round house, and the side kick. All three if done correctly and delivered quickly and at the right time in a fight can and would be devastating and a fight ender if you will. Back when I took TKD for a short time I was taught a lot of “cool kicks” things like the Ax kick, crescent, back kick, spinning back kick, and others. They are “cool” to watch but I have to wonder about the practicality of these kicks for street use. I would love to hear your thoughts on that topic. Sorry if I should have made this into more than one thread.

    Then that brings back to Kenpo, in some of the stances, I’ll take the neutral bow for instance. To me this is an uncomfortable stance I am long legged and have a hard time with the heel to toe alignment while keeping the proper distance, Knee to heel, and bending the knees all at the same time. I end up with my rear foot not flat on the ground but with my heel raised a few inches. This tends to take away some of my stability and makes it awkward to throw a proper kick from this stance. I have been told time and again that it will become more comfortable as I get more used to being in this stance. But I also hear a lot about how Kenpo is/can/should be tailored to the individual student. At what point does Kenpo become MY Kenpo. I know this sounds funny but I am not sure how to ask the question I have in my mind. I understand that I am still a beginner and I will be expected to perform the stances and moves exactly as they are taught to me. I respect that 100% but at some point in the future will I be able to take what I learn and change it to fit me and my individual style? If so when around 1st Dan maybe 3rd Dan, I am in no way taking anything away from Mr. Parker or my instructor as I have a deep respect for both.

    Another problem I tend to wrestle with when I learn a new technique, it is awkward at first but that is normal and I expect that. But I tend to get some of the moves mixed up with other techniques, for instance I will add a strike, or I may start with part of one tech then finish with the end of the tech I intended to do in the first place. And I don’t have but fifteen maybe twenty to deal with at this point, how do you contend with over a hundred and then the extensions that I keep reading about? And I am also a little overwhelmed with all the forms I have in front of me. I have Short 1 down pretty good. I will be working on Long 1 next month. I am working on stance set this month, I have coordination set down ok and I have star block set down good. But from what I can tell of the posts here I still have short 2, 3, 4 and long 1-9 to go! Wow that’s a lot of info that I will have to cope with over the next few years then you add all the tech’s I will be learning I almost think they should have called Kenpo the Genius art.

    And I also wanted to ask what are some of everyones favorite techs? Of the ones I have learned to this point there are a few that I like more than the others. I think they all are great but these stand out as the most probable to find myself in a situation that would require these techniques.

    #1 Twin Kimonos, the defense is simple yet devastating. Just from playing with this tech at home I can see a lot of room to add strikes and improvise if needed.

    #2 Captured twigs, again fast, simple and devastating on the unsuspecting assailant.

    #3 Rolling Bears, Always good to have a ground tech in the tool box if the fight ends up on the ground.

    #4 Defying the storm, this tech makes me think of the words of Mr. Bruce Lee. Tae of Jete Kune Do or way of the intercepting fist. (I hope that is the correct translation) I love the way the first move is to intercept the club and take control of the arm of the opponent then devastate with a barrage of possible strikes

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Part of training is remembering you face 3 types of opponents: The brawler (no training, just 'fights'), the trained (has some martial arts training), and the guy who does exactly what you do. Your basics will work against most brawlers, your midrange techniques against another martial artist, and the high end techs against someone trained as you are, where it becomes more of a chess game. The core is always your basics though.

    As to keeping things straight, I believe that there is a false conception about kenpo, and thats that the techniques must be done textbook in the real world. My take is, that they are an encylopedia of "what ifs" that you can break apart and graft in different parts depending on your immediate requirements. How to do that, and how to "index" them will come with time and training. There are alot of similarities between family groupings of techniques that you'll learn as you go.

    As to the "making it yours" part, think about how we all learned to write. We followed templates, traced letters, etc. Over time, we added our own personalisations to how we write, yet in most cases, it's still legible. (Mine aint, but.... ) Your mixups are normal...I did that all the time when I studied Kenpo, and still do mix techniques up when training. It'll come with time.
    For ANY and ALL KenpoTalk issues, please use theContact Us link here or at page bottom right. Do NOT PM me for site support.

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by 2004hemi

    I guess my first question is what do you think is the most affective and practical kick for street use be it a Kenpo style kick or otherwise.. The simple front kick, off the front leg so you don't telegraph Or a knife edge kick to the knee or shin.. mine is the front kick. 1st taught.. 1st to be forgotten.

    Then that brings back to Kenpo, in some of the stances, I’ll take the neutral bow for instance. To me this is an uncomfortable stance I am long legged and have a hard time with the heel to toe alignment while keeping the proper distance, Practice this whenver you're just standing around. Gotta stretch muscles that are rarely used. Kneel down and make sure your heel is even with your knee to get the proper distance, then stand up and push those heels out and knees and tuck your butt. It is not comfortable no matter how long your legs are, but it gets better with practice and time.


    But I also hear a lot about how Kenpo is/can/should be tailored to the individual student. At what point does Kenpo become MY Kenpo. I know this sounds funny but I am not sure how to ask the question I have in my mind. I understand that I am still a beginner and I will be expected to perform the stances and moves exactly as they are taught to me. I respect that 100% but at some point in the future will I be able to take what I learn and change it to fit me and my individual style? If so when around 1st Dan maybe 3rd Dan, I am in no way taking anything away from Mr. Parker or my instructor as I have a deep respect for both.
    Tailoring is fine if you have a disability that disallows you from learning and doing the tecs, forms, sets, etc the base way. Knowing Of the Equation Formula is all you need at your level. Tailoring comes way down the line.
    Your individuality is your Style. The way you do a tec, from your own Kia, to your movements. This will change as you progress through the system. Mechanical stage to fluidity. You'll also most likely find you go through phases of regression. This is all part of learning. We are putting our bodies through moves that are unfamiliar to our muscles , our brains, we all have different styles, part of that is called forth from our inner selves, some are agressive, passive, the list goes on.

    Learn the basics, Continue hammering the basics even when you think you know them, (Yellow and Orange)- even when you're so sick of them, go back, do short form 1,2, blocking set, coordination set 1, go through the entire gambit .. never stop


    Another problem I tend to wrestle with when I learn a new technique, it is awkward at first but that is normal and I expect that. But I tend to get some of the moves mixed up with other techniques, for instance I will add a strike, or I may start with part of one tech then finish with the end of the tech I intended to do in the first place. And I don’t have but fifteen maybe twenty to deal with at this point, how do you contend with over a hundred and then the extensions that I keep reading about?
    Show me someone who doesn't get them mixed up and I'll be amazed. Sure some people have these mathematical minds that can keep things in order and memorize.. to me they are rather robotic.. Good grief, I have always inserted a Kick into Alternating Maces.. No clue why.. never was taught that.. but It for some stupid reason unknown to me, it feels right.. Don't let it worry you.. I've gotten so frustrated over not having the tecs straight in my head.. but I can demo them. Some can.. some can't.. the Memorization stuff .. I will never be able to do it.. My mind is to full of other everyday goings on..


    And I am also a little overwhelmed with all the forms I have in front of me. I have Short 1 down pretty good. I will be working on Long 1 next month. I am working on stance set this month, I have coordination set down ok and I have star block set down good. But from what I can tell of the posts here I still have short 2, 3, 4 and long 1-9 to go! Wow that’s a lot of info that I will have to cope with over the next few years then you add all the tech’s I will be learning I almost think they should have called Kenpo the Genius art.
    One at a time.. Always go back and work Short Form 1.. Long Form 1 is a piece of cake once you know Short 1's moves. Stance Set is just that.. Stances.. you don't need any arm movements.. you already know the stances.. now it's time to really start hitting them. Go over it and over it and over again.. make sure you're hitting them correctly - course that goes for any set or form etc.. Muscle memory recall is our friend Repetitive training.
    Don't worry about anything you don't have to know... that's rather like.. Oh what is going to happen 4 years 56 days and 342 minutes from now.. who knows.. doesn't matter..
    Just learn what you need for the belt you're working on, always keep what you've already learned fresh by keep working it


    And I also wanted to ask what are some of everyones favorite techs? Of the ones I have learned to this point there are a few that I like more than the others. I think they all are great but these stand out as the most probable to find myself in a situation that would require these techniques.

    I like Glancing Salute, 5 Swords, Thundering Hammers just to name a few
    You'll do just fine,. Don't fret about things you don't need to know, just know of them

    Just my thoughts

    ~Tess

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    You start making the Art yours after you have a strong base, usually at Black Belt, sometimes you see it earlier.

    Remember most of these stances are new to your body, and it is hard to adjust especially if you have studied another style. Give it time, and you will soon feel comfortable.

    Confusion is part of the learning process. Just keep doing what you are doing and it will eventually click.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Wow! You do have a lot on your mind. Let's see...I guess we'll start with the kick issue since that was your first concern. =) I agree, the front snap kick is probably the most useful. A good side kick to the bladder or knee can render some pretty effective results as well. Don't discount the rear thrusting heel kick though (may be refered to as a mule kick or simply back kick.) It is especially useful if facing multiple attackers. (especially if one attacker is approaching from 6:00 ) The important thing is to make sure you utilize the right weapon against the right target. That being said, no kick is ineffective when utilized properly.

    Next: The neutral bow stance. IMHO, if it doesn't feel right, then it isn't. The neutral bow should feel more comfortable to you, that's the point. You should be relaxed, feet APPROXIMATELY shoulder width apart with your rear leg offset to the front of your body so that its use is not hindered (in other words you don't have to offset your front leg in order to execute a kick with the rear one.) Kenpo is YOUR Kenpo from the get-go. Just adapt the principles to your body type. If you're long legged, your feet may be further than shoulder width apart. The important thing is that you are bladed to reduce exposure of targets, that you are mobile, that your knees are bent/relaxed to help avoid injury if struck and to allow for explosive movement, and that the use of your rear leg is not hindered.

    Many do refer to Kenpo as the "thinking persons art." Just take things one step at a time. It's not a race, there is no checkered flag, or end point. It's called a 'Journey', not a 'Destination.' No matter your rank, there is always more to learn. I remember struggling with certain techniques/forms. Just relax, take your time, and practice them over and over. Repetition is the key. =) BTW, "inserting" is part of the equation formula and it appears that you've already learned "grafting!" LOL. Nothing wrong with that =)

    Don't get discouraged, if Kenpo was really easy what would be the point of studying it? LOL.

    IMHO =)
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Take notes - it helps, especially when there are so many techs similar to one another.

    Happened yesterday to me in fact..."isn't this how x goes?"

    Brian: "No that's y"

    Me: "Then how does x go?"

    Brian: "its this"

    Me: "where's the hammerfist?"

    Brian: "There isn't one"

    Me: "I thought there was...and the kids saw it yesterday also with one...? Im confused"

    ..and apparently Im not the only one LOL
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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    OK off topic- Tess, how do you quote and insert your comments like you did up there?

    I would like to respond in sections like that also...

    Sorry to de-rail

    James
    The above is just my opinion.

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by Dianhsuhe
    OK off topic- Tess, how do you quote and insert your comments like you did up there?
    Hit the Quote button.. then take what you wish to respond to, and add your own input in another color and I bolded mine.
    I would like to respond in sections like that also...

    Sorry to de-rail

    James
    Then go below the quote to add anything else
    hope that helps James~!

    ~Tess


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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Mr. Hubbard, “think about how we all learned to write. We followed templates, traced letters, etc. Over time, we added our own personalization’s to how we write, yet in most cases, it's still legible.” That is a good analogy and one that I will try too remember. I also want to ask if it’s not too personal, but in your post you said when you trained in Kenpo. Does that mean you are no longer studying Kenpo? If not may I ask what style to practice now.

    Mrs. Tess, “Show me someone who doesn't get them mixed up and I'll be amazed. Sure some people have these mathematical minds that can keep things in order and memorize... to me they are rather robotic... Good grief, I have always inserted a Kick into Alternating Maces... No clue why. Never was taught that. but It for some stupid reason unknown to me, it feels right.. Don't let it worry you.. I've gotten so frustrated over not having the techs straight in my head.. but I can demo them. Some can.. some can't.. the Memorization stuff .. I will never be able to do it. My mind is to full of other everyday goings on...” Well it is good to know I am not alone in messing up some of the techs I do get frustrated but I know that if I keep on keeping on all I will do is improve. That leads into what Mr. Broad said

    Mr. Broad, “Confusion is part of the learning process. Just keep doing what you aredoing and it will eventually click.” Again good advise, also nice website I bookmarked the page I would like to spend some more time watching the videos when I am not at work.

    Celtic_Crippler,” Don't discount the rear thrusting heel kick though (may be referred to as a mule kick or simply back kick.” That’s a topic that hits real close to home. We worked on that kick last night and I agree this is a very affective kick. But in my case lets see if I can put this as nice as possible (I am terrible at that kick) That’s kills me as I can do a spinning back kick and a jump spinning back kick pretty well but look like a drunk horse doing the straight back kick. I plan to work with the wave master tonight (maybe until my legs fall off) working on my kicks as I am not happy with them yet. But I will put in the time to help me improve if it kills me. Also very nice website, I bookmarked yours as well and I’ll spend more time looking at the clips when I am at home. I also like your Sig, “I am undefeated in all of Asia! Of course, I've never competed in Asia so that pretty much guarantees I'm undefeated there.” That cracked me up

    Mrs. Miyu
    “Brian: "No that's y"
    Me: "Then how does x go?"
    Brian: "its this"
    Me: "where's the hammer fist"
    Brian: "There isn't one"
    Me: "I thought there was”


    Wow that sounds familiar, about what I go through in every class LOL. Also cool website, I will e mail a link to my parents they were talking about having a site built for their horse business. I just don’t have the know how or the patience to mess with Html (:


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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by 2004hemi
    Mr. Hubbard, “think about how we all learned to write. We followed templates, traced letters, etc. Over time, we added our own personalization’s to how we write, yet in most cases, it's still legible.” That is a good analogy and one that I will try too remember. I also want to ask if it’s not too personal, but in your post you said when you trained in Kenpo. Does that mean you are no longer studying Kenpo? If not may I ask what style to practice now.

    Mrs. Tess, “Show me someone who doesn't get them mixed up and I'll be amazed. Sure some people have these mathematical minds that can keep things in order and memorize... to me they are rather robotic... Good grief, I have always inserted a Kick into Alternating Maces... No clue why. Never was taught that. but It for some stupid reason unknown to me, it feels right.. Don't let it worry you.. I've gotten so frustrated over not having the techs straight in my head.. but I can demo them. Some can.. some can't.. the Memorization stuff .. I will never be able to do it. My mind is to full of other everyday goings on...” Well it is good to know I am not alone in messing up some of the techs I do get frustrated but I know that if I keep on keeping on all I will do is improve. That leads into what Mr. Broad said

    Mr. Broad, “Confusion is part of the learning process. Just keep doing what you aredoing and it will eventually click.” Again good advise, also nice website I bookmarked the page I would like to spend some more time watching the videos when I am not at work.

    Celtic_Crippler,” Don't discount the rear thrusting heel kick though (may be referred to as a mule kick or simply back kick.” That’s a topic that hits real close to home. We worked on that kick last night and I agree this is a very affective kick. But in my case lets see if I can put this as nice as possible (I am terrible at that kick) That’s kills me as I can do a spinning back kick and a jump spinning back kick pretty well but look like a drunk horse doing the straight back kick. I plan to work with the wave master tonight (maybe until my legs fall off) working on my kicks as I am not happy with them yet. But I will put in the time to help me improve if it kills me. Also very nice website, I bookmarked yours as well and I’ll spend more time looking at the clips when I am at home. I also like your Sig, “I am undefeated in all of Asia! Of course, I've never competed in Asia so that pretty much guarantees I'm undefeated there.” That cracked me up

    Mrs. Miyu
    “Brian: "No that's y"
    Me: "Then how does x go?"
    Brian: "its this"
    Me: "where's the hammer fist"
    Brian: "There isn't one"
    Me: "I thought there was”


    Wow that sounds familiar, about what I go through in every class LOL. Also cool website, I will e mail a link to my parents they were talking about having a site built for their horse business. I just don’t have the know how or the patience to mess with Html (:
    One of the hardest things for adults to do is to learn how to learn again.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by 2004hemi
    Wow that sounds familiar, about what I go through in every class LOL. Also cool website, I will e mail a link to my parents they were talking about having a site built for their horse business. I just don’t have the know how or the patience to mess with Html (:
    Thank you, I appreciate it

    I guess what we're all trying to say is that its OK to be confused. On my black belt exam, I started off with one tech, and ended it with a similar one. I was basically told that it was ok since I made it flow together seamlessly n_n*

    And since its ok to be confused, its also ok to ask questions to get it clarified!
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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by 2004hemi
    I guess my first question is what do you think is the most affective and practical kick for street use be it a Kenpo style kick or otherwise.
    The one that works......., this would depend on the situation and position of your attacker as well as your ability to get it off quickly without thinking!! (don't try to make the xyz kick work for everything, why are there so many different kicks?? think about it)
    Quote Originally Posted by 2004hemi
    Then that brings back to Kenpo, in some of the stances, I’ll take the neutral bow for instance. To me this is an uncomfortable stance
    Foundation is everything, the neutral bow stance is just that, the most efficient NEUTRAL stance. Keep in mind the neutral bow stance is where all other stances come from (pivot your back foot to face forward = Forward Bow, pivot your front foot to face backwards = Reverse Bow, Kneel forward with the rear leg = Closed Kneel, kneel down both legs /w knees apart = Wide Kneel, etc.....)
    Foundation is everything and Foundation starts w/ the Neutral Bow!!

    Quote Originally Posted by 2004hemi
    I have star block set down good.
    This set is by far the most important set in Kenpo IMHO!! Ask anyone what the most important move is in ANY technique??


    The opinions expressed here are my own and no animals were injured in the making of them.
    What have I learned from this???

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Star block set has a ton of great information in it. Some people look into it to see what all is there, other just take it at face value and miss so much.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Broad
    Star block set has a ton of great information in it. Some people look into it to see what all is there, other just take it at face value and miss so much.
    Sir, It was you who first sparked my in depth interest in the Star Block because of a previous posting on a different message board.
    Double Star Block, X-Block, Universal Block, Both Forward, Both Reverse, One Arm Forward & One arm reverse, Change the order to make circles/ovals, etc.... (it goes on and on)
    Thank you!!!
    What have I learned from this???

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenpo-Sloth
    Sir, It was you who first sparked my in depth interest in the Star Block because of a previous posting on a different message board.
    Double Star Block, X-Block, Universal Block, Both Forward, Both Reverse, One Arm Forward & One arm reverse, Change the order to make circles/ovals, etc.... (it goes on and on)
    Thank you!!!
    Variable expansion is a great lesson, and an even better teacher.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Just reading all of the information here always makes me feel so much better. Normally I have a great memory, but sometimes in class, my sifu will stand in front of me, and I swear I turn into "Rainman". Forms and tecs I'd be able to perform just fine for Rob suddenly turn into the dance scene from "GREASE".
    It definately gets better with time, but it does take just that... time. (And some very patient instructors!!!)
    "Second chances they don't never matter, people never change
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    (*this is where a punch would be landed)

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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by 2004hemi
    Where to start with this, I have a few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions. Keep in mind I have only been in Kenpo well this is my 9th month of training so some of my questions may be very common but I am new and only way I will learn is to ask. Some of these questions and or comments I do not wish to ask my instructor because I would never want to give him the impression that I am not happy with Kenpo or with the way he teaches some aspects of Kenpo. I plan to stick around in his school as long as he will have me and I am hoping that will prove to be many years.

    I guess my first question is what do you think is the most affective and practical kick for street use be it a Kenpo style kick or otherwise. In my limited experience of martial arts it is my opinion that there are three. The front snap kick, the round house, and the side kick. All three if done correctly and delivered quickly and at the right time in a fight can and would be devastating and a fight ender if you will. Back when I took TKD for a short time I was taught a lot of “cool kicks” things like the Ax kick, crescent, back kick, spinning back kick, and others. They are “cool” to watch but I have to wonder about the practicality of these kicks for street use. I would love to hear your thoughts on that topic. Sorry if I should have made this into more than one thread.

    Then that brings back to Kenpo, in some of the stances, I’ll take the neutral bow for instance. To me this is an uncomfortable stance I am long legged and have a hard time with the heel to toe alignment while keeping the proper distance, Knee to heel, and bending the knees all at the same time. I end up with my rear foot not flat on the ground but with my heel raised a few inches. This tends to take away some of my stability and makes it awkward to throw a proper kick from this stance. I have been told time and again that it will become more comfortable as I get more used to being in this stance. But I also hear a lot about how Kenpo is/can/should be tailored to the individual student. At what point does Kenpo become MY Kenpo. I know this sounds funny but I am not sure how to ask the question I have in my mind. I understand that I am still a beginner and I will be expected to perform the stances and moves exactly as they are taught to me. I respect that 100% but at some point in the future will I be able to take what I learn and change it to fit me and my individual style? If so when around 1st Dan maybe 3rd Dan, I am in no way taking anything away from Mr. Parker or my instructor as I have a deep respect for both.

    Another problem I tend to wrestle with when I learn a new technique, it is awkward at first but that is normal and I expect that. But I tend to get some of the moves mixed up with other techniques, for instance I will add a strike, or I may start with part of one tech then finish with the end of the tech I intended to do in the first place. And I don’t have but fifteen maybe twenty to deal with at this point, how do you contend with over a hundred and then the extensions that I keep reading about? And I am also a little overwhelmed with all the forms I have in front of me. I have Short 1 down pretty good. I will be working on Long 1 next month. I am working on stance set this month, I have coordination set down ok and I have star block set down good. But from what I can tell of the posts here I still have short 2, 3, 4 and long 1-9 to go! Wow that’s a lot of info that I will have to cope with over the next few years then you add all the tech’s I will be learning I almost think they should have called Kenpo the Genius art.

    And I also wanted to ask what are some of everyones favorite techs? Of the ones I have learned to this point there are a few that I like more than the others. I think they all are great but these stand out as the most probable to find myself in a situation that would require these techniques.

    #1 Twin Kimonos, the defense is simple yet devastating. Just from playing with this tech at home I can see a lot of room to add strikes and improvise if needed.

    #2 Captured twigs, again fast, simple and devastating on the unsuspecting assailant.

    #3 Rolling Bears, Always good to have a ground tech in the tool box if the fight ends up on the ground.

    #4 Defying the storm, this tech makes me think of the words of Mr. Bruce Lee. Tae of Jete Kune Do or way of the intercepting fist. (I hope that is the correct translation) I love the way the first move is to intercept the club and take control of the arm of the opponent then devastate with a barrage of possible strikes
    For the kicks I would have to say wither a front kick, round house, or back kick. For me, I would do them off my front foot. Mixing techniques up is not anything unusual. I am sure all of us have done it at one point of time. After a while everything will fall into place and you will hear that lightbulb qlick on. As for these favorite techniques, I would agree with you on all of those. But I do not know Rolling Bears. These techniques get event better as you learn the extensions.
    "To hear is to doubt. To see is to be deceived. But to feel is to believe." -- SGM Ed Parker

    "Sic vis pacem parabellum - If you want peace, prepare for war." -- "The Punisher"


    "Praying Mantis, very good. . . For catching bugs." --Jackie Chan

    "A horse stance is great for taking a dump" --Jet Li

  18. #18
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    Default Re: A few questions, some gripes, and even some opinions

    Seems allot of your questions have been answered but I’d like to throw in my 2 coppers coming from a different point of view.

    I too am new to Kenpo, but not new to martial arts.

    I have fairly long background in several forms and have been having the hardest time with unlearning and relearning... I tell ya.. muscle memory can be your best friend... but it can get really annoying too.

    Effective kicks... they all have their place.

    For immobilization (quick low side kick to the knee or ankle, a good round kick to the center of the thigh.. Mui Thai taught me that one, front snap to the bottom edge or outer edge of a knee cap.)

    For damage (round to the floating ribs, front to the groin or solar plexus)

    For misdirection or to setup (outside crescent to sweep the hands out of the way, hook to catch their kidneys and turn them.)

    Even for intimidation (throw a clean windmill or tornado kick if against a crowd... you don't even have to hit anything and it will buy you some time when no one wants to engage you directly.)


    As for all the techniques, repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition, repetition, ohh did I mention repetition? heheh and Kenpo is far from the only one. In Tang Soo Do each belt had 5 grappling, 5 technique, 5 ju-jitsu, 2 forms from white to orange, then you add sparing. At 2nd brown you start developing your own grappling response and techniques on top of your new ones and a 3rd form..

    Crazy thing was that allot of the attacks are the same... so there I was learning grasping twigs and my first reflex is to drop into a low horse thrust my arms forward breaking the grasp, grabbing the attackers right forearm and striking with a reverse elbow. Pulling their body forward onto mine, bowing slightly to place their center of gravity over my hips as my right hand reaches back to grasp their shoulder as I torque my hips and slam their body on the ground in front of me...

    Fortunately I have always been aware enough to stop myself from doing this, but it's very confusing.

    Neutral bo... hummm that should be like the most comfortable stance.. though I have allot of trouble with the heal toe alignment thing too. When working alone and I feel I am off I find that just a short jump in the air and let myself land naturally fixes it. After a few steps i keep finding myself tooo wide... sigh... more repetition.

    bottom line.. patience, repetition, more patience... heheh it's worth it. Make sure your not leaning in your stances... your shoulders improperly placed over your hips will make any stance uncomfortable no matter how correct the feet are.

    good luck and keep with it.

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