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Thread: Non-Common Terminology

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    Default Non-Common Terminology

    I have looked through the 5 books on Infinite Insights into Kenpo and read several pages on terminology on the web (including this site which has one by Rob Broad) but there are still some terms I cannot find. There are some terms that I would like definition on. I understand them at some level, but a good explanation would really help me.

    Here are the terms. Feel free to answer just one or all of them.

    Depth of Action (I have to check his depth of action)
    Path Against the Line (I think this is short for The Path of Action against the Line of Action) but what does Path of Action and Line of Action mean.
    Centerline Theory (somewhat intuitive, but what is the real definition)

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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    Ok take a reverse punch. When you do a reverse punch without moving you had has one way of going from your hip to the extension of the punch. That is your Line of Action.

    Now Depth of Action and Path of Action are pretty much the same thing if I am reading Depth of Action correctly. Take that same punch and step drag forward with it. That movement forward is like a path. So it is Line of Action with a movement any which way, in this case forward.

    As for Centerline Theory I don't have it here at school. I know it has to be in one of the Infinite Insights. I can not remember it right off hand. My brain is still is Physiology mode right now. LOL
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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    Per the Enclyopedia of Kenpo:

    Depth of Action: The ability to extend the range of your offensive and defensive movements, when and where needed, to obtain maximum results from your efforts.

    There is no entry for Path Against the Line, Path of Action, of Line of Action. There is this though:

    Path of Execution: Although, technically, both Path of Execution and Path of Travel can be used interchangeably, Path of Execution more specifically refers to the route that an offensive move follows when traveling to its target. It can be delivered horizontally, vertically, or diagonally.

    Path of Travel: This term generally refers to the route that a defensive move follow when traveling to its point of contact. It also can be delivered horizontally, verically, or diagonally.

    Line of Attack: Path than an opponent follows when attacking you. This can come from any direction per the Clock Principle.

    Line of Entry: That line or path of penetration that allows you or your opponent access to targets via vertical ascension or descent. The weapon may be exectued vertically, upward, or downward depending on whether you or your opponent are standing or in a prone position. To thwart an opponent's efforts you may be (1) on the line of entry (2) n top of the lind of entry [on top of their foot] (3) inside of the line of entry, and (4) over the line of entry. In contrast to Angle of Entry, Line of Entry demands a specific path and direction of entry.

    No entry for Centerline Theory, but it is in realation to:

    Center of Gravity: That point around which one's weight is evenly distributed so that your body is kept in constant balance to help maximize your physical movements.

    *Imagine a pole running directly through the center of your body.

    Hope that helps.
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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    The term Centerline Theory is most common in CMA's, and refers to how your system controls the center line- yours and your opponents. The universal concept that AK based systems use to accomplish this is Dimensional Control Theory. However, some add internal concepts like proprioceptive miscues and unballancing maneuvers (Doc Chapel and the SL-4 crowd come to mind here). Dr. La Tourette apparently plays mind games with his opponents as well.

    Some schools, especially those that mix Kenpo and arts like Wing Chun or JKD, use the Chinese model. There are three center lines in any one on one confrontation- yours, which divides your body vertically into two symetrical halves, his (does same to him), and the central line, which runs from your center line to his at the point where they intersect the ground. These lines also define planes, and of course can be subdivided, and so on.

    In simplified form, the idea is to hide and defend your center line while taking and exploiting his; and to control the central line. Who controls central line controls the fight, and who controls his opponents centerline controls his opponent.

    Books could be written on this (and have been, of course), so I'll stop with just this basic overview. Hope it helps.

    Dan C
    Last edited by thedan; 05-03-2007 at 07:02 PM. Reason: add vertically for clarity
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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    That's very close to what we're taught.
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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    In the school I trained in we had two terms, constant centerline and relative centerline.

    The constant centerline divides the body in two roughly symetrical halves. It runs from the scalp, through the nose, to the navel, and terminates at the genitalia. Most of the major targets on the human body are at or near this centerline, including eyes, nose, throat, solar plexus, bladder, and groin.

    The relative centerline splits the body in two halves, relative to your perspective of your opp. This helps you to identify shifts in your opp. weight and balance, weapons which present a more immediate threat, where attacks are more likely to come from, and available targets on your opp.

    Both of these centerlines exist on both you and your opp. and as much attention should be payed to identifying them on your opp. as defending them on yourself.


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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    Quote Originally Posted by Thesemindz View Post
    The relative centerline splits the body in two halves, relative to your perspective of your opp. This helps you to identify shifts in your opp. weight and balance, weapons which present a more immediate threat, where attacks are more likely to come from, and available targets on your opp.
    I like that distinction, as it follows naturally with central line control. It is also useful to understandinbg other concepts, such as weapons. Mosaad Ayoob said (talking about shooting, but the concept is easily transfered to other weapons) "The successful shootist looks at his opponent like a CAT Scan." The idea is to target internally, not on the surface, since the real target moves in relation to the surface as the body changes position relative to you. So, as your opponents "relative centerline" changes, so does the plane it defines which runs through those internal targets. This is a good example of both the use of centerline theory and the importance of understanding it. Thanks.

    Dan C
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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan View Post
    The idea is to target internally, not on the surface, since the real target moves in relation to the surface as the body changes position relative to you.
    Great quote. Excellent point about the "real target" of our strikes.


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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    Hopefully the insightful posts here have answered your questions
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    Default Re: Non-Common Terminology

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan View Post
    The term Centerline Theory is most common in CMA's, and refers to how your system controls the center line- yours and your opponents. The universal concept that AK based systems use to accomplish this is Dimensional Control Theory. However, some add internal concepts like proprioceptive miscues and unballancing maneuvers (Doc Chapel and the SL-4 crowd come to mind here). Dr. La Tourette apparently plays mind games with his opponents as well.

    Some schools, especially those that mix Kenpo and arts like Wing Chun or JKD, use the Chinese model. There are three center lines in any one on one confrontation- yours, which divides your body vertically into two symetrical halves, his (does same to him), and the central line, which runs from your center line to his at the point where they intersect the ground. These lines also define planes, and of course can be subdivided, and so on.

    In simplified form, the idea is to hide and defend your center line while taking and exploiting his; and to control the central line. Who controls central line controls the fight, and who controls his opponents centerline controls his opponent.

    Books could be written on this (and have been, of course), so I'll stop with just this basic overview. Hope it helps.

    Dan C
    Very nicely done Dan.

    And I did an entire chapter on that/those concept (s) in one of my books, circa 1980.

    Sincerely,
    Dr. John M. La Tourrette

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