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Thread: Your Black Belt Thesis

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    Default Your Black Belt Thesis

    Okay, I'm only a blue belt and I may be looking too far ahead but...

    What are the requirements for a black Belt Thesis in EPAK? Do other styles require this?

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Mine thesis was on Short Form 1. It had to be 20 pages minimum, and that was all the guidelines I was given. I turned in 80 pages and 6 hours of video.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Broad View Post
    Mine thesis was on Short Form 1. It had to be 20 pages minimum, and that was all the guidelines I was given. I turned in 80 pages and 6 hours of video.
    Wow, sounds like a very well prepared thesis!

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    I was quoted out of the Journey book or the kenpo dictionary or something and it said 'must be a paper about an aspect of kenpo' or something equally vague.

    I was told we had to create 10 new techniques that, I think, had to be part of the thesis.

    I'd post mine, but frankly, I don't think it's my best work. My instructor never read it (or at least I don't think he did).

    If others would like to post their thesis', that'd be cool.

    --Amy
    The New Kenpo Continuum Book is now accepting submissions for volume 2. Our fabulous, ever-changing website is Sacramento Kenpo Karate.
    I'm a member of the Universal Life Church and the ULC Seminary. I'm also a Sacramento Wedding Minister and Disc Jockey
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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    I posted my paper here a while back. Keep in mind, I also wrote this quite a while back.

    http://www.kenpotalk.com/forum/showt...rk+positioning
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by amylong View Post
    I was quoted out of the Journey book or the kenpo dictionary or something and it said 'must be a paper about an aspect of kenpo' or something equally vague.

    I was told we had to create 10 new techniques that, I think, had to be part of the thesis.

    I'd post mine, but frankly, I don't think it's my best work. My instructor never read it (or at least I don't think he did).

    If others would like to post their thesis', that'd be cool.

    --Amy
    I tried and tried for years and years to collect others' black belt thesis. I thought it would make a cool collection. Maybe we could have a "Thesis" section???
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Crippler View Post
    I tried and tried for years and years to collect others' black belt thesis. I thought it would make a cool collection. Maybe we could have a "Thesis" section???
    I'll re-read mine and if it's not too embarrassing, I'll post it.

    Or perhaps I'll post it and hopefully you all won't judge me too harshly.

    --Amy
    The New Kenpo Continuum Book is now accepting submissions for volume 2. Our fabulous, ever-changing website is Sacramento Kenpo Karate.
    I'm a member of the Universal Life Church and the ULC Seminary. I'm also a Sacramento Wedding Minister and Disc Jockey
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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by amylong View Post
    I'll re-read mine and if it's not too embarrassing, I'll post it.

    Or perhaps I'll post it and hopefully you all won't judge me too harshly.

    --Amy
    If I was willing to post mine....... I mean.....c'mon..... Nobody 'round here is going to judge you harshly. I'm sure there is value in what you wrote.
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Crippler View Post
    I posted my paper here a while back. Keep in mind, I also wrote this quite a while back.

    http://www.kenpotalk.com/forum/showt...rk+positioning
    Good stuff, thanks for the link. Why do you think more people don't post their thesis?

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by amylong View Post
    I'll re-read mine and if it's not too embarrassing, I'll post it.

    Or perhaps I'll post it and hopefully you all won't judge me too harshly.

    --Amy
    If you decide to post it I promise I won't judge it

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by crane557 View Post
    Good stuff, thanks for the link. Why do you think more people don't post their thesis?
    I don't know. I never really got a response all the times I tried to get them in the past. My thinking was what better insight into someone elses perspective on Kenpo than their black belt thesis? I thought a collection of them would make an excellent resource and training tool. Just my 0.02
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Crippler View Post
    I don't know. I never really got a response all the times I tried to get them in the past. My thinking was what better insight into someone elses perspective on Kenpo than their black belt thesis? I thought a collection of them would make an excellent resource and training tool. Just my 0.02

    It would be a great collection. I suspect people are uncomfortable posting it because they question what they wrote, if it will measure up, etc.

    I didn't put a lot of effort into mine, I'm embarrassed to say, because I knew my instructor wouldn't read it.

    And the other two I read were not ones I think anyone would want to post. I think some greater guidelines for writing the papers would be helpful.

    --Amy
    The New Kenpo Continuum Book is now accepting submissions for volume 2. Our fabulous, ever-changing website is Sacramento Kenpo Karate.
    I'm a member of the Universal Life Church and the ULC Seminary. I'm also a Sacramento Wedding Minister and Disc Jockey
    New Cool (free) kenpo tool bar: http://KenpoKarate.OurToolbar.com/


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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Over the years I have had the opportunity to look over people's thesis many times. I have always been available to pre-read and comment on a thesis before a student hands it into their instructor before the BB test, and have read a lot of good stuff.

    To post my thesis I would have to get it back from my instructor(not going to happen) and then re-type it into my computer, since the origal was typed on Comodore 64.

    A lot of people find their thesis to be a very personal thing and do not want it viewed by others because it may reveal too much about themselves.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Broad View Post
    Over the years I have had the opportunity to look over people's thesis many times. I have always been available to pre-read and comment on a thesis before a student hands it into their instructor before the BB test, and have read a lot of good stuff.

    To post my thesis I would have to get it back from my instructor(not going to happen) and then re-type it into my computer, since the origal was typed on Comodore 64.

    A lot of people find their thesis to be a very personal thing and do not want it viewed by others because it may reveal too much about themselves.
    Gotta respect that. But I still enjoy reading the ones I can...hey, every opportunity to learn!
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    To any of members in teh process of writing their thesis if you would like objective eyes to read it before you submit it please contact me.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Crippler View Post
    I tried and tried for years and years to collect others' black belt thesis. I thought it would make a cool collection. Maybe we could have a "Thesis" section???
    Great idea! I really like it! Of course, it will need to be of those who are willing to include theirs in the Thesis section. There are a few I've read over the past couple of years and I learned a lot from them. It got me thinking what would be meaningful for me with my own thesis. I started thinking about this when I was a blue belt, and I thought I got a topic I liked. Each time I advanced in rank, my topic ideas changed. We'll see by the time I reach 1st brown if I've come to something more "solid" to examine about Kenpo.

    - Ceicei
    Studying martial arts is for life, not for the color of the belt.

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    OK ... I am currently working on my Thesis. I'll put a small portion here. My charge is to break down and analyze Short and Long Form 3 and Form 4. I am to related each of the forms within itself, and to the other two forms.

    Just a small portion to add here ... if someone is interested in reading six pages worth of notes. This is just the description fo Short Form 3 for my thesis. I have a few notes about the relationships in the form, but most of that will be in a different section of the Thesis.


    Form Description

    Here we begin a detailed explanation of the motion of Short Form 3. All references to the clock principle throughout the description are directed from the starting reference of 12 O’clock.


    Short Form 3 – Destructive Twins

    This form begins from an attention stance, after the salutation.

    The presumed attack is a two-handed pull in from an aggressor standing directly in front of the practitioner, at 12 O’clock.

    Using the principle of purposeful compliance, the practitioner steps directly forward with the right foot, while executing two punches together. The left hand punches palm down to the aggressors face, as the right hand punches palm up to the bladder or groin. This combination of punches is referred to as a ‘U Punch’. This attack should destabilize the aggressor’s base.

    The practitioner moves from the U punch to a combination of two blocks. The upper, left arm drops down the center line into a left downward palm down block, clearing the aggressor’s right arm. The lower, right arm circles counter clockwise to an inward block, checking the aggressors left arm and preventing use of the left hand near the face. While these two hand maneuvers are being executed, the practitioner moves his right foot out a short distance, to a right neutral bow stance, in a ‘cheat step’ move. This cheat step is used to solidify the base, which was not done appropriately when using purposeful compliance in the first move.

    The practitioner continues the counter-clockwise rotation in both hands. The left downward palm down block moves to a left vertical outward block. The right inward block continues its circle to the cocked position at the right hip. The practitioner moves into a right forward bow stance to add torque to the close-range vertical outward block, as the hands complete these counter clockwise rotations. This also sets up the torque for the next move.

    The practitioner rotates his left hand from the vertical outward block to a palm-down finger poke to the aggressor’s eyes. The expected response is that the aggressor will raise his hands toward his eyes. The practitioner can then use his left hand to grab the attacker’s left hand and pull down to his hip. While executing this pull to destabilize the aggressor’s stance, the practitioner rotates out of the forward bow into a side horse stance facing 10:30 O’clock with a thrusting horizontal punch to the aggressor’s floating ribs.

    Short Form 3 – Crashing Wings

    The next attack is an arms free bear hug from 6 O’clock.

    The practitioner is in a horse stance on the 7:30 – 1:30 line, facing 10:30 O’clock. The next move is the first of three ‘V-Steps’ in Short Form 3. The practitioner draws the right foot back and rotates clockwise to a right 45° cat stance facing 12 O’clock, and then steps out to 3 O’clock.

    During this foot maneuver, the hands move from their point of origin, up the center line, with the palms facing in, to the full extent of the arms, overhead. At the top of the arm extension, the palms rotate outward to a finger flick, thumb poke combination. The cat stance and thumb poke should be reached at the same time. As the practitioner steps out from the cat stance, the raised hands drop from the apex, to left and right inward, downward elbows; striking the aggressors forearms.

    The hand and foot maneuvers above use the marriage of gravity power principle, and need to be executed with proper timing to be effective. The hands and feet must work together. The elbow strikes must occur as the body settles into the horse stance.

    The practitioner next executes the second ‘V-Step’; drawing the left foot to the right foot, into a left 45° cat stance. With this foot maneuver, the hands are both brought to the right hip in the ‘cup and saucer’ shape, keeping the elbows tight to trap the aggressor’s arms. The practitioner steps out on the 7:30 line, behind the aggressor’s right leg, planting the left foot into a right forward bow facing 1:30. The practitioner rotates counter clockwise in place, executing a left diagonal upward elbow strike to the aggressor’s chin which continues through the strike and wraps the aggressor’s right arm. During this rotation, the right hand is raised high and strikes diagonally downward on the aggressor’s bladder. At the end of this rotation, the practitioner will be in a left forward bow facing 7:30. The aggressor will have been knocked to the ground by the hyperextension over left leg and the bladder strike.

    During this technique, the practitioner executes a 180° in place turn; from the right forward bow to the left forward bow.

    Short Form 3 – Twirling Wings - Opposite

    The next attack is a two hand shoulder grab from the rear; 3 O’clock from the form’s origin.

    In the form, this technique is executed on the opposite side.

    From the left forward bow, the practitioner executes the third ‘V-step; drawing the right foot toward the left, into a left close kneel stance. As this foot draws in, the hands form the ‘cup and saucer’ shape on the left hip. The practitioner steps the right foot out to 3 O’clock into a right rear bow stance, being certain to pick up the cover angle (step one stance width over the 3 O’clock line). Utilizing the torque power principle, the practitioner rotates clockwise in place; executing a right vertical outward block with a left inward elbow strike, ending in a right forward bow stance.

    The practitioner executes a left step through foot maneuver (toward 1:30?) with a right downward diagonal elbow strike, ending left rear bow stance on the 1:30 - 7:30 line. Again, the hands are in the cup and saucer shape on the left hip.

    Short Form 3 – Circling Wing

    The attack in Circling Wing is a two handed choke from the rear; the 7:30 line.

    The practitioner circles the right elbow vertically and clockwise into an outward downward elbow, ending with the right fist cocked at the hip. Through this elbow rotation, the body pivots in place from a left rear bow into right forward bow facing 7:30. Also with this rotation, the practitioner executes a thrusting four finger eye poke with the left hand.

    The practitioner then utilizes reverse motion with the right elbow, executing an upward elbow into the aggressor’s chin. Continuing with reverse motion, the practitioner pivots back to the left rear bow and into a wide kneel stance as the right elbow continues its circle, elongating into a right rear upward hammer fist strike to the aggressor’s groin. During this maneuver, the left hand stays mostly in place, changing function from the poke, to a cover over the right shoulder.

    During this technique, the practitioner rotates clockwise 180° in place, and also rotates counter clockwise 180°, all in place, without altering the position of the stance.

    Short Form 3 – Crossing Talons – Fulcrum Version

    The attack for the next sequence is a cross wrist grab to the right wrist. The right arm is extended down the 7:30 line from the immediate prior hammer fist strike. The Practitioner is in a left wide kneel stance facing 1:30.

    The practitioner pivots in place to a low horse stance facing 4:30, while counter-grabbing over the right wrist with the left hand. Next the practitioner turns the right hand in, up, and over, palm open, to counter grab the aggressor’s right forearm. While turning toward the aggressor and executing a left forward step through foot maneuver down the 7:30 line, the practitioner executes a downward elbow strike on the aggressor’s elbow, pulling the forearm up in a manner to place that aggressor’s arm on a diagonally downward line.

    A left outward elbow to the aggressor’s head is performed with a side shuffle and hip check. The left hand continues to a left heel palm claw to the aggressor’s face.

    Two orbital switches take place with the left elbow. The first orbital switch is from a width strike to a depth maneuver. It is used to keep the aggressor bent over by checking the aggressor’s back. The second orbital switch is from the depth dimension to the height dimension as the left elbow is raised and dropped in a downward elbow onto the aggressor’s spine.

    As the downward elbow strike occurs, the practitioner drops to a left wide knee stance with marriage of gravity.

    Short Form 3 – Scraping Hoof

    The presumed attack for this sequence is an attempted full nelson. The angle of attack is from the 4:30 line based on the form’s point of origin.

    The transition from the wide kneel stance to the high stance is completed by drawing in the left foot to a natural stance, as the fists punch down, trapping the aggressor’s arms tight to the body, with a rear head butt that strikes high and back. At the end of this transition, the practitioner should be standing as tall as possible.

    A sequence of three kicks takes place as the upper body remains still. The right foot does a heel kick to the inside of the aggressor’s left shin, executes a knife edge kick to the inside of the aggressor’s right shin. The foot work ends with a scraping stomp; the right foot slides down the inside of the aggressor’s right leg, and stomps the aggressor’s right instep.

    Again, throughout the foot work, the upper body remains in place, the aggressor’s arms locked under the practitioner’s elbows.

    Short Form 3 – Fatal Cross

    The presumed attack for this sequence is a two handed low push from the front, from the 10:30 line in the form.

    The practitioner draws the right foot in to a 45 ° Cat Stance as the hands execute low line, double outward parries; circling over the top of the push, down the center line, then turning palm out while riding the force outside and past the practitioner’s body.

    The practitioner steps forward with the right foot into a right neutral now while attacking the aggressor’s solar plexus with snapping middle-knuckle fist strikes. Along with this forward motion, the practitioner executes a forward head butt strike. The middle knuckle strikes snap back, crossing over each other (left outside right), to the chest. The crossed arms then execute snapping outward back fist strikes to the aggressor’s jaw. Finally the crossed hands execute simultaneous two finger outward slices to the aggressor’s eyes.

    While the stance throughout this sequence of strikes is a constant right neutral bow, the practitioner is expected to provide back up mass to the strikes with body motion, rocking back and forth in the stance, with the strikes.

    Short Form 3 – Grip of Death - Opposite

    The presumed attack is a headlock. The attacker is on the practitioner’s right side. Both are facing the form’s 10:30 line. In the form, this technique is executed on the opposite side.

    The practitioner moves with the aggressor’s action, stepping through with the left foot, dragging the right foot forward to a left close kneel stance while striking with double inward hammer fists. The left hammer fist strikes the aggressor’s groin as the right hammer fist strikes the aggressor’s right kidney. The right hand contours up the aggressor’s back, reaching over the left shoulder and grabbing the aggressor’s head. As the right elbow anchors downward, the head of the aggressor is drawn back and down as a left heel palm strike to the aggressor’s chest drives the aggressor to the ground. The practitioner should be careful to check the aggressor’s left arm with a right tunnel check.

    The stances transition through the technique from the left close kneel, to a left neutral bow as the right hand tracks up the aggressor’s back, and finally rotating into a right forward bow stance with the left heel palm strike.

    Short Form 3 – Locked Wing

    The presumed attack for this sequence is a hammer lock. The practitioner is facing 4:30. The attack is also presumed to be from 4:30. This requires a 180° body rotation as part of the technique.

    The practitioner drops his right hand from the tunnel check in Grip of Death behind the back to represent the hammer lock.

    From the right forward bow, the practitioner executes a deep rear crossover. The left foot must travel 180° plus the cover angle. As the foot moves down the 10:30 – 4:30 line, the body rotates counter clockwise while executing a left outward elbow. The elbow strike elongates into a left heel palm strike to the face. The practitioner should be facing 4:30 in a left forward bow.

    Utilizing an in place stance change, the practitioner’s left hand moves from the heel palm strike to a downward strike on the inside of the aggressors’ arm while the practitioner rotates to right forward bow facing 10:30. This move locks the aggressor’s arm, and torques the aggressor around the practitioner.

    The practitioner steps back with the right foot with a reverse step through foot maneuver while bending the arm at the elbow to lock the aggressor’s right arm. This move should complete the action of bringing the aggressor to the ground and in front of the practitioner.

    The practitioner begins to move the right arm in a large counterclockwise vertical circle to a downward hand sword strike on the back of the aggressor’s neck. As the hand crosses the apex of the circle, the practitioner executes a right upward knee strike to the aggressor’s face. The downward hand sword and upward knee strike should strike at the same time to utilize the dual opposing forces to increase the effectiveness of the strikes.

    Short Form 3 – Crossed Twigs

    The presumed attack is a dual rear wrist grab. The practitioner begins this technique facing 10:30 with the aggressor behind him, at 4:30.

    The attack begins immediately from the dual strikes (hand sword and knee kick) in the previous technique. The practitioner must drop his hands down and behind his back with the step down from the knee strike.

    Beginning the technique from a right neutral bow stance facing 10:30, the practitioner demonstrates a counter grab with his hands and pulling forward. Executing a short left step through foot maneuver, the practitioner needs to pick up the cover angle while stepping up the 10:30 line. The practitioner can then pivot 180° degrees to face 4:30, while executing an outward right elbow strike on a high line, aimed at the aggressor’s temple, ending in a right forward bow.

    From the elbow strike, the practitioner circles the right arm clockwise, indicating a continued pulling motion to destabilize the aggressor’s base. The right elbow executes an orbital switch, moving from the outward elbow, moving in a horizontal clockwise direction to a counterclockwise vertical direction. The right hand pull continues into a right downward elbow strike to the aggressor’s spine.

    The practitioner brings the left hand up to mirror the position of the right hand, and executes simultaneous downward heel palm claw strikes to the aggressor’s kidney’s with an upward left knee strike to the aggressor’s abdomen. Again, the practitioner utilizes opposing motion to increase the effectiveness of the strikes.

    The practitioner ends this technique by stepping back from the non-committed left knee kick into a training horse stance, facing 1:30.

    Short Form 3 – Wings of Silk

    This technique is for a dual arm lock from behind. The practitioner is facing 1:30 with the attack originating from 7:30.

    The practitioner executes two prefixed moves; a left foot stomp on the aggressor’s left foot and a left hand pinch on the aggressor’s left thigh or aggressor’s groin. These two moves are prefixed to the technique to destabilize the aggressor’s base and setup the technique.

    The practitioner executes a right rear scoop kick to the aggressor’s groin with a right rising rear elbow to the aggressor’s chin. The foot and elbow should move together on their upward trajectories, striking with backup mass – force moving inline with the strike.

    As the strikes reach their target, the practitioner spins in place, 360°, unwinding from the rear arm lock. The unwinding motion should allow the practitioner to plant his right foot either next to, or behind, the aggressor’s left foot.

    The practitioner’s left arm should remain locked tightly against the hip, reversing the arm lock on the aggressor. As the practitioner pivots in place, the aggressor’s left arm will be extended across the practitioner’s chest. This extension of the aggressor’s left arm allows the practitioner to execute an uppercut arm strike on the aggressor’s elbow.

    Short Form 3 – Conquering Shield

    This technique begins with the practitioner facing 1:30. The presumed attack is a left lapel grab from directly in front of the practitioner.

    The practitioner shows a pinning move with the left hand, grabbing the aggressor’s left hand grab at the right shoulder. Simultaneously, the practitioner shows an upward middle knuckle strike on the outside of the aggressors forearm with a right snapping kick to the aggressor’s groin. The dual strikes demonstrate backup mass one a vertical line – force moving inline with the strike.

    The Practitioner lands with an inward downward elbow strike on the aggressor’s left arm while landing in a right forward bow stance.

    Using reverse motion, the practitioner executes an upward elbow strike to the aggressors chin. The right kick will have effectively closed the range, allowing for the short range elbow strike. Also, the practitioner is able to add to the force of the upward elbow strike by rotating out of the right forward bow stance into a neutral bow stance.

    The practitioner drops into a right wide kneel stance with a right downward heel palm, claw strike to the aggressor’s face.

    Short Form 3 – Striking Serpents Head

    This is the final technique in the form. The presumed attack is an arms free bear hug from directly in front of the practitioner, who is facing 1:30.

    The practitioner executes a right step through reverse to a left forward bow stance. The practitioner’s right hand is still raised from the prior technique’s heel palm claw strike. In this technique it shows a check on the aggressor’s head; holding the head back from an attempted head butt.

    The practitioner steps back while cocking his left hand straight out in front of himself. From the right forward bow stance, the practitioner unwinds into a neutral bow stance with an inward inverted back knuckle strike to the back of aggressor’s head.

    The practitioner then shows a reach over the crown of the aggressor’s head, grabbing either the hair or eye sockets, and anchoring the left elbow down. This motion will expose the aggressor’s throat. The practitioner then executes a right half fist strike into the aggressor’s throat; utilizing torque by pivoting into, and out of, a left forward bow stance with the strike.

    The form ends with the practitioner stepping forward with the right foot, 135°, to be in a training horse stance facing 12 O’clock.

    The practitioner ends with a full salutation.


    Thank you. I have completed a first edit. There will be another edit or two before I complete it. All comments are welcome. All questions are welcome. [
    Mike

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    Cool Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Crippler View Post
    I don't know. I never really got a response all the times I tried to get them in the past. My thinking was what better insight into someone elses perspective on Kenpo than their black belt thesis? I thought a collection of them would make an excellent resource and training tool. Just my 0.02
    I liked your thesis a lot. Very interesting stuff indeed. In fact I'd like to post it on my my website (www.katsudokenpo.nl) with your permission after translating it in Dutch. I try to add at least one article a month, sometimes from the newspapers about our school, sometimes translated articles from foreign (to us) writers, sometimes there'll be my own articles.

    Just let me know if that's OK with you and in which way you'd like to be creditted (website adress or just your name, whatever you like). You may let me know here, or by PM: marcel @ katsudokenpo.nl

    Thanks in advance,
    Marcel
    ******************
    Marcel de Jong
    4th degree Black
    www.katsudokenpo.nl
    ******************

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Broad View Post
    Over the years I have had the opportunity to look over people's thesis many times. I have always been available to pre-read and comment on a thesis before a student hands it into their instructor before the BB test, and have read a lot of good stuff.

    To post my thesis I would have to get it back from my instructor(not going to happen) and then re-type it into my computer, since the origal was typed on Comodore 64.

    A lot of people find their thesis to be a very personal thing and do not want it viewed by others because it may reveal too much about themselves.
    That's a good point!

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    Default Re: Your Black Belt Thesis

    Quote Originally Posted by Ceicei View Post
    Great idea! I really like it! Of course, it will need to be of those who are willing to include theirs in the Thesis section. There are a few I've read over the past couple of years and I learned a lot from them. It got me thinking what would be meaningful for me with my own thesis. I started thinking about this when I was a blue belt, and I thought I got a topic I liked. Each time I advanced in rank, my topic ideas changed. We'll see by the time I reach 1st brown if I've come to something more "solid" to examine about Kenpo.

    - Ceicei
    So I'm not the only Blue Belt to think of this huh?

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