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Thread: Brushing the Storm

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    John Brewer's Avatar
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    Default Brushing the Storm

    Well I learned this as the second technique on the Green Card. As always I welcome any suggestions or comments. These notes as are the rest of my posts are from my own notes, so any inconsistencies or shortcomings are my own.

    Brushing the Storm:
    Flank Overhead Club Attack

    • Standing naturally an opponent attacks with an overhead club from 3:00
    • Step to 3:00 with your right foot into a right fighting horse with a left upward parry carrying the attack over your shoulder
    • Shoot a right palm heel underneath the parry to the opponents face
    • Step forward to a left front twist with a right downward elbow (in close) to the liver
    • Twist clockwise to a left neutral bow with a right palm to the groin
    • Maintain a low left check (very important)
    • Hook opponents leg with your right hand
    • Pull backward on the leg and use the left check to push down on the hip
    • Step back to a left 45 degree cat
    • Left snap kick to the groin ( you are still holding the leg)
    • Land gauging left foot
    • Right side thrust kick to opponents knee
    • Double Cross Out Right over Left
    Much respect,

    Crane

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    Default Re: Brushing the Storm

    Oops I guess I should have put this in the technical section.

    Sorry

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    JamesB is offline
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    Default Re: Brushing the Storm

    Never really been too convinced by this the technique. Problems I perceive are:

    As soon as you sense the attacker's movement you will naturally turn towards him - in other words, align your hips more towards 11/12 o'clock (2/3 o'clock by your reference). So the idea of a flank attack is a little odd to me. You will always naturally turn to face him, and from here you will either be instinctively drawing away, or will have the presence of mind to start thinking how to slip up the outside as he 'steps through'.

    Stepping into a neutral-bow for the initial strike seems flawed. You also risk crashing into the attacker's leg as he steps through - also the direction you are taking means that your right-palm-heel is striking behind you somewhere (assuming you're neutral-bow is the same as mine). Lot's of strain on your right shoulder, not very efficient and/or effective in my opinion. I prefer to step directly into a forward-bow to 11 o'clock - I find my hips+shoulders are aligned more naturally. Faster to move into this stance as well.

    The 'palm heel under the attacker's arm to his face' seems risky to me. With that club thundering down on you, as you are striking upwards underneath.... I would think that you are putting yourself in a position where you are very susceptible to damage. Perhaps if you meet the attack early enough that you can jam his arm before it begins it's swing downwards. Hmmmmm.....

    The next move, step foward into a left front twist, seems problematic unless further adjusting footwork is used prior to this stance change. Basically, you would be too close to allow this movement forwards without first stepping back with your right foot, as I see it.

    You next said this:

    Quote Originally Posted by crane557
    Maintain a left low check (very important)
    Firstly, what are you checking? and why is it so important? I would prefer the left hand to be doing something active - controlling the opponent's posture for example, rather than a passive check which does nothing.

    Lastly, I've always found it difficult to pick up + control the attacker's leg, if the attacker is much bigger/stronger than I. Always end up exerting alot of effort to make this part of the technique work - doesn't seem like the most efficient tactic to me, at least for smaller people.

    regards,
    James

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    Lightbulb Re: Brushing the Storm

    Hi Sir,

    Thanks for the input. I have some questions about this technique also, but we are taught there is something that can be learned from each technique and perhaps the awkward positions involved are part of it.

    The initial reaction the way I understood it is based on a attack you do not see until the last second. The initial response comes from a modified "fighting horse" not a neutral bow, so the palm isn't exactly behind you but not exactly comfortable either. The palm under the parry is odd to me also, but maybe using his momentum to carry him into the palm lends force.

    The left twist is one of those awkward positions perhaps? But from a horse it's much easier than from a bow. Maybe there is a knee buckle there also?

    As you twist to a neutral with the palm strike to the groin the attackers leg is right there for the grab. The way I understand it after the grab he will end up trying to balance on the other leg. The check is there for any incidental flailing or reactions as he's pulled off balance.

    Once again this forum has helped me to refine the questions that I have for my instructors. Thanks again,

    Salute,

    John

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    JamesB is offline
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    Default Re: Brushing the Storm

    Quote Originally Posted by crane557
    The initial reaction the way I understood it is based on a attack you do not see until the last second.
    This is certainly a plausible reason for the technique being the way it is. I'm not as familar with this techniqe as I perhaps should be, but personally I would simply 'walk forwards' if I sensed this attack too late - in other words, if the club was hurtling down towards my head from 3 o'clock a simple step towards 12 is all it takes for him to miss you.

    Quote Originally Posted by crane557
    The initial response comes from a modified "fighting horse" not a neutral bow, so the palm isn't exactly behind you but not exactly comfortable either. The palm under the parry is odd to me also, but maybe using his momentum to carry him into the palm lends force.
    I'm not familiar with the term 'fighting horse' - I thought perhaps you meant neutral bow? I think maybe your fighting horse refers to a 'side horse' or 'box stance' in that case (as I call it)?

    Now personally I get very apprehensive about 'modified horse stances' and 'modified neutral bows'. There's only really one way to structure your body in these stances - if your goal is integrity of the stance. Modifications to a stance are basically misalignments of your entire body structure, and unless the reason for this 'modification' is well understood, there is a very real risk of reduced structural integrity and ultimately a less effective response.

    The big issue I've always had with this technique (again, I'm far from expert) is where/how to step: If you step 'straight out' to 3.00 then you can more comfortably make the heel-palm from a side-horse. However there are two problems as I see it. Firstly, you risk crashing into the attacker's leg as he powers through. Worse though, you are stepping directly under/into the swing of the club. The attack is from 3:00, and you are stepping to 3.00!! That club is coming down *fast*. Obstructing the Storm teaches you to jam the attacker's 'club arm' before it swings down - but 'Brushing the Storm' does not control the club arm this way, so if you step into the attacker you'll get struck on the head. Doesn't seem very logical from my perspective / understanding.

    So in my opinion you need to step *off* the line of attack. Which means stepping to 2 o'clock. Which also means that your neutral bow/horse stance at this position makes it impossible to execute an effective palm heel to the jaw, because you are now striking behind yourself.

    This is why I prefer a more aligned right-forward-bow to 2 o'clock. You pivot your hips first (to 2.00), then step straight forwards to that angle. It's a faster way to get to the same position, and now your hips+shoulders are aligned such that you can make the heel-palm more easily/effectively. Try it in class, you may find you like it that way also.

    Quote Originally Posted by crane557
    The left twist is one of those awkward positions perhaps? But from a horse it's much easier than from a bow. Maybe there is a knee buckle there also?
    It's more a case of simply being too close / in the wrong position to make a *correct* front twist stance. But then I'm stepping out of the line of attack so I'm in a different position anyway. But I would suggest you look at the distances involved - you may well need adjusting footwork to make that twist-stance *effective* (that's the important aspect for me at least).

    hopefully some others will share their thoughts as well..

    cheers,
    James

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    Default Re: Brushing the Storm

    Thanks,

    I really apreciate your input. I have class tonight so I will definitely try your suggestions. I agree with the instinct to step off of the angle of attack.

    Cheers!

    John

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