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Thread: Help Out a Neophyte - Bracing Angle

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    windy is offline
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    Default Help Out a Neophyte - Bracing Angle

    I am studying the Parker system. Right now, I seek to understand better the relationship between stances and blocks/strikes deployed against an attacker. Could you please pick a self-defense technique and give a short discussion of one of the sections in the sequence where bracing angle is key to making the tech work? What strike/block/kick/stance is used by you? What angle is it in relation to the attacker? Why?

    Thank you.

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    Default Re: Help Out a Neophyte - Bracing Angle

    Hi Windy,

    Bracing angle is defined in the Encyclopedia of Kenpo as:

    "The positioning of the body to strengthen and support the execution of a defensive or offensive move in anticipation of impact upon contact."

    Essentially, it means positioning and aligning your body in a way that allows you to optimally use its mechanics in regards of the desired effect.

    To achieve the desired effect includes taking your opponent's bracing angle away as he attacks you. In fact, pretty much every Parker Kenpo technique - if done properly - starts with that! Some call it taking the opponent's centerline, others talk about uprooting him, etc. - it's all the same: Throw him off balance, physically and mentally, while you stay well balanced yourself, and he is all yours.

    For example, let's look at Alternating Maces: As the opponent attempts to push you by his both hands, you brace yourself by dropping back into a stable stance, while your inward block deflects his left incoming arm at or above the elbow at an angle of 45 degrees. (But in effect, you are deflecting both of his arms out of the way.) Your arm's positioning allows you to apply a fair amount of force in a direction in which his forward moving arms are weak. The impact should shake him up and momentarily leave him in a jammed position.

    Next you are checking his arms downwards which should not only open and square him up, but also make him slightly move toward you, while your vertical punch hits him a split second later. Your body is contracted and fully behind your punch, your back heel is pushed firmly against the ground, so all that force you are generating goes right into - and through - your hapless opponent.

    Finally, your upper body expands again as it torques in the opposite direction, to let that back knuckle fly out to your opponent's face or head.

    Hope you get the picture.

    These same principles apply to all the techniques in the Parker system. Study them all while keeping bracing yourself and unbracing your opponent in mind.

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    Default Re: Help Out a Neophyte - Bracing Angle

    Quote Originally Posted by windy View Post
    I am studying the Parker system. Right now, I seek to understand better the relationship between stances and blocks/strikes deployed against an attacker. Could you please pick a self-defense technique and give a short discussion of one of the sections in the sequence where bracing angle is key to making the tech work? What strike/block/kick/stance is used by you? What angle is it in relation to the attacker? Why?
    Charging Ram

    1 - Attacker does NOT have momentum. Attacker is bent over in the shape of a Charging Ram.
    2 - Defender steps left foot to 4:30, facing 10:30 in a right neutral, landing with a hand shot to the back of the attackers neck.
    3 - Defender executes a right front ball kick to the Attackers ribs. The kick is travelling from the 4:30 to the 10:30 line. The attacker does not have brace angle against this line of force. A force full kick will cause the attacker to pedal toward 10:30. The defender will probably have to chase the attacker for the next kick. This is accomplished by choosing where to place the right foot down, after the kick.
    4 - Defender executes a left kick toward the attacker; depending upon the attackers body position, the left kick could be vertical, it could be inward upward diagonal, or it could be horizontal.

    When seeing this technique in class, it is often seen without that 'chase'. Everybody is friendly in class. Nobody really wants to break their training partners ribs. So, not enough force is executed to show the lack of brace angle.

    FWIW

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    Default Re: Help Out a Neophyte - Bracing Angle

    I think the most basic example is the stance transition from neutral bow to frontal bow stance. The rear leg locks down and drives the heel into the ground. The creates a bracing angle for the punch to send all of the energy into the attacker and stop any forward momentum of the attacker. It is one reason why many traditionalists are against the rear heal coming up off the ground on the frontal bow stance, it gives more reach and some argue power, but it doesn't allow the stance to brace at that point.
    "For he is God's servant to do you good. But if you do wrong, be afraid, for he does not bear the sword for nothing. He is God's servant, an agent of wrath to bring punishment on the wrongdoer."

    Romans 13:4

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