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Thread: Seeking the Neutral Bow

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    Default Seeking the Neutral Bow

    So how do you like to hit/find/seek your neutral bow, and why?

    I’ve known guys who, from a natural standing position, will slide the left foot back (toes of both feet still pointing forward), then “settle” by rotating (counter-clockwise) their feet into the toe/heel line (toes at a 45 degree angle) and emphasize the hip rotation/loading the forward weapon.

    I know some who will slide the left foot back into the 45 degree position, then drop their height and kick the front foot/hip into position.

    What do you all like to do, and why?
    "But it ain't about how hard you hit, it's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward... How much you can take and keep moving forward - that's how winning is done!"

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    Default

    On a basic level, if I'm stepping back, I'm rotating into the stance on the balls of my feet. Knees kicked out, feet parallel in the "heel-toe" position. Weight should be evenly distributed across the bottom of the foot when completed, with even weight distribution on both feet.
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    Default Re: Seeking the Neutral Bow

    Quote Originally Posted by JayWilson View Post
    So how do you like to hit/find/seek your neutral bow, and why?

    I’ve known guys who, from a natural standing position, will slide the left foot back (toes of both feet still pointing forward), then “settle” by rotating (counter-clockwise) their feet into the toe/heel line (toes at a 45 degree angle) and emphasize the hip rotation/loading the forward weapon.

    I know some who will slide the left foot back into the 45 degree position, then drop their height and kick the front foot/hip into position.

    What do you all like to do, and why?
    Depends. I prefer finding my neutral bow as I am moving in to hit someone.

    If you are referring to stepping back into a neutral, then I step back, either foot pointed forward or 45 degrees as I step, depending on why I am stepping back. Then I adjust my front foot by (old way) rotating to 45 and my more recent way, PAMing (lift and stomp) to 45. I pivot the back foot if I am still in a forward bow.
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    Default Re: Seeking the Neutral Bow

    Pick the feet up and place them authoritatively (no sliding), and if needed, adjust the foot that most recently moved.
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    Default Re: Seeking the Neutral Bow

    When stepping back (or forward) with the rear foot pointing forward (as in a forward bow), then PAMing the front foot....do you PAM, then pivot into the neutral bow...or is the best use of a PAM found with the rear foot stepping or sliding back into the 45degree angle?
    "But it ain't about how hard you hit, it's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward... How much you can take and keep moving forward - that's how winning is done!"

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    Default Re: Seeking the Neutral Bow

    When stepping forward, you don't PAM the front foot, but the rear one, and it's a pretty natural movement. Moving back, you move the rear foot back and place it at a 45 degree angle, which puts you in a transitional Rear Bow. You then lift the front foot and turn it also to about 45, and place it back down, heel making contact first.
    Of course, I'm known for sometimes not writing things correctly, and welcome corrections from Doc or anybody else.
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    Default Re: Seeking the Neutral Bow

    Distance and rotation together. Unless, the next beat requires torque; then it is distance, and then, rotation.

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    Default Re: Seeking the Neutral Bow

    Quote Originally Posted by michaeledward View Post
    Distance and rotation together. Unless, the next beat requires torque; then it is distance, and then, rotation.
    That is the method I am acquainted with as well, though I sometimes work on or use PAMs, what little I know about them.
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    Default Re: Seeking the Neutral Bow

    Great topic, Mr. Wilson.

    Part of our default mechanism is to engage the platform of the legs while we bring our upper body into action. Using the scenario of moving back into a Right NB from a natural standing position, I will:

    1) Bend the left knee, much as one would if they were going to step forward with their right foot.
    2) Rotate the right foot on the inside ball, kicking the heel out to the 45 degree angle of the NB. The right heel plants succinctly. The torso takes on the 45 degree angle of the NB at the same time.
    3) Drive back into the NB using the quadracep of the right leg.
    4) Land the left foot succintly, all at once.
    5) Search frantically through my pockets for the can of whoop ass.

    Cheers.
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    Default Re: Seeking the Neutral Bow

    Here's a write-up from Doc on this subject from a little while back:


    There is more than one methodology predicated on what you are attempting to accomplish, and there is a distinction made between "mobility" versus "stability." On a basic level we first teach "mobility" as the primary method when moving forward, and "stability" when moving rearward or changing angles.

    When moving forward from a right neutral bow to a left neutral bow, you PAM the lead foot to 12:00, into a rear bow stance. This is followed by the rear foot pivoting toward 12:00 so you may "push-off" moving forward as in normal "walking." You plant forward in what we call a "Mobile Forward Bow."

    That is both feet are pointed to 12:00, and once again this action mimics the normal body function of "walking."

    All of this accomplished with no loss of structure or forward stability while being mobile, with the option to continue forward with other action or to stabilize in a neutral bow by ...

    When the foot plants in a singular action mobile scenario, the foot immediately pivots by pushing the heel outward to 45-degrees. The rear leg is now straight, the weight distribution is 60/40 forward, and you now are in a proper Forward Bow.

    To shift into a neutral bow, you simply raise your rear knee, turn your foot to 45-degress and replant or PAM, adjusting the weight distribution to 50/50, into your now very stable neutral bow.

    All of this accomplished with no loss of structure or forward stability while being mobile, with the option to continue forward with other action or add additional stance stability.

    The action is designed to function under load. That is if you were engaged with an attacker at distance four, and needed to overcome his body weight and muscle mass while engaged in a neutral bow, this would allow you to move forward. The only difference would be if you are already engaged and need the stability factor immediately, you would plant your foot forward at 45-degrees, and immediately PAM into the neutral Bow with the rear foot.

    All of which I could actually teach you in a couple of minutes, and demonstrate its effectiveness, over trying to describe the action with the written word. When actually demonstrated by someone who has accomplished the footwork, it appears smooth, quite natural, and happens so quickly it must be done painfully slow to see what is happening."

    Here Bode demonstrates the rear movement stability version, exaggerating all the action for outreach students.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2ygtY4JhmA
    "To be, rather than to seem"

    "Fix your rear foot ... What the hell is wrong with you?"

    "...I already watched the videos, and quite frankly, they're bullsh*t."

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