Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 24

Thread: Follow Up

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    2,270
    Thanks
    237
    Thanked 113 Times in 95 Posts

    Default Follow Up

    Which martial art would you take to follow up you Kenpo abilities?

    For me it would be Judo because we do nothing on the ground and I know for me if the fight became wresteling I would lose.
    "To hear is to doubt. To see is to be deceived. But to feel is to believe." -- SGM Ed Parker

    "Sic vis pacem parabellum - If you want peace, prepare for war." -- "The Punisher"


    "Praying Mantis, very good. . . For catching bugs." --Jackie Chan

    "A horse stance is great for taking a dump" --Jet Li

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Elk Grove, CA
    Posts
    4,018
    Thanks
    1,163
    Thanked 913 Times in 561 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Aikido looks interesting.

    And Arnis to work more on sticks.

    What's a good style for knives?

    --Amy
    The New Kenpo Continuum Book is now accepting submissions for volume 2. Our fabulous, ever-changing website is Sacramento Kenpo Karate.
    I'm a member of the Universal Life Church and the ULC Seminary. I'm also a Sacramento Wedding Minister and Disc Jockey
    New Cool (free) kenpo tool bar: http://KenpoKarate.OurToolbar.com/


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    2,270
    Thanks
    237
    Thanked 113 Times in 95 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Quote Originally Posted by amylong
    Aikido looks interesting.

    And Arnis to work more on sticks.

    What's a good style for knives?

    --Amy
    I would talk to Dr. Gyi about that one. He is the one that taught me the K-bar and Kukari.
    "To hear is to doubt. To see is to be deceived. But to feel is to believe." -- SGM Ed Parker

    "Sic vis pacem parabellum - If you want peace, prepare for war." -- "The Punisher"


    "Praying Mantis, very good. . . For catching bugs." --Jackie Chan

    "A horse stance is great for taking a dump" --Jet Li

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Elk Grove, CA
    Posts
    4,018
    Thanks
    1,163
    Thanked 913 Times in 561 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Quote Originally Posted by parkerkarate
    I would talk to Dr. Gyi about that one. He is the one that taught me the K-bar and Kukari.
    Talk to Dr. who? About teaching you the what and the what?

    --Amy
    The New Kenpo Continuum Book is now accepting submissions for volume 2. Our fabulous, ever-changing website is Sacramento Kenpo Karate.
    I'm a member of the Universal Life Church and the ULC Seminary. I'm also a Sacramento Wedding Minister and Disc Jockey
    New Cool (free) kenpo tool bar: http://KenpoKarate.OurToolbar.com/


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    2,270
    Thanks
    237
    Thanked 113 Times in 95 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Quote Originally Posted by amylong
    Talk to Dr. who? About teaching you the what and the what?

    --Amy
    Dr. Maung Gyi. K-bar = Combat Knife, a Kukari is like a small machete.


    He is the founder of Bando, he was one of Mr. Parkers great friends and he s now a friend of my instructor that is how I got to know him. He is a great guy.
    "To hear is to doubt. To see is to be deceived. But to feel is to believe." -- SGM Ed Parker

    "Sic vis pacem parabellum - If you want peace, prepare for war." -- "The Punisher"


    "Praying Mantis, very good. . . For catching bugs." --Jackie Chan

    "A horse stance is great for taking a dump" --Jet Li

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    My own private Idaho
    Posts
    5,294
    Thanks
    4,905
    Thanked 3,583 Times in 2,189 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    We've plugged a decent amount of CMA into our kenpo system, especially at the higher ranks. After BB, CMA is the primary focus. The more flowing, circular movement is a really nice compliment to kenpo power and principles.

  7. #7
    jfarnsworth's Avatar
    jfarnsworth is offline Parker / Planas Lineage
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Mansfield, Ohio
    Posts
    1,575
    Thanks
    168
    Thanked 386 Times in 260 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Jiu-Jitsu for me.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sarnia, ON, Canada
    Posts
    7,774
    Thanks
    301
    Thanked 1,263 Times in 801 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    I would want to study another style of Kenpo, probably Kara Ho.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Hoth
    Posts
    2,211
    Thanks
    83
    Thanked 81 Times in 71 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    sitting in a Dr Gyi seminar is always rewarding.

    I would like to learn Ju Jitsu, or any other ground fighting
    Susan A. Spann

    Something Here Coming Soon

    Member of the Estrogen Mafia and Proud Owner of THIS Thread (FOREVER D:< )



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Sarnia, ON, Canada
    Posts
    7,774
    Thanks
    301
    Thanked 1,263 Times in 801 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Dr. Gyi can be a scary, scary man. He is the human equivalent of Yoda, soft spoken and walking with a cane til he steps out on the floor, then he is just amazing to watch.
    Quality outweighs quantity every time.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Hoth
    Posts
    2,211
    Thanks
    83
    Thanked 81 Times in 71 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    I love Dr Gyi. He has a wonderful sense of humour. And he worked a sprain out of my neck. He has an amazing understanding of how the body works. I learned a lot when he was fixing me, because he was explaining every step he did
    Susan A. Spann

    Something Here Coming Soon

    Member of the Estrogen Mafia and Proud Owner of THIS Thread (FOREVER D:< )



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    6,026
    Thanks
    1,199
    Thanked 1,520 Times in 909 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    I studied Jiu-Jitsu prior to Kenpo and we routinely work grappling drills in class. If your current school is primarily focused on striking I would definately reccomend some sort of "grappling" art. Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, Sambo, or even Greko-Roman. In terms of self-defense, the ground is definately the last place you want to find yourself, but you need to be prepared for it just like anything else.

    If I didn't have access to a Kenpo school (God forbid) I would probably try to find a JKD school. Aikido would be my third choice after that.
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

  13. #13
    Hunter's Avatar
    Hunter is offline
    KenpoTalk
    3rd. Brown Belt
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Wichita KS
    Posts
    709
    Thanks
    225
    Thanked 183 Times in 112 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    I would probably take Judo and Pekiti Tersia. I had studied Arnis in the past and enjoyed it a lot, Pekiti just seems to be a different method and system of FMA movement then what I remember from Arnis and to be honest I like it better. Judo..something I tried and loved as a kid, I have been told I am built like a good judoka but with no Judo schools in my area
    www.hunterskarate.com

    "I believe that to have a friend, a man must be one."

    - From the Lone Ranger's Creed




  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    2,270
    Thanks
    237
    Thanked 113 Times in 95 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Pekiti Tersia

    I am not familiar with this style, could you explain it some?
    "To hear is to doubt. To see is to be deceived. But to feel is to believe." -- SGM Ed Parker

    "Sic vis pacem parabellum - If you want peace, prepare for war." -- "The Punisher"


    "Praying Mantis, very good. . . For catching bugs." --Jackie Chan

    "A horse stance is great for taking a dump" --Jet Li

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    6,026
    Thanks
    1,199
    Thanked 1,520 Times in 909 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Quote Originally Posted by parkerkarate
    Pekiti Tersia

    I am not familiar with this style, could you explain it some?
    I found this:
    http://www.bladefighting.com/
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

  16. #16
    wes tasker's Avatar
    wes tasker is offline
    KenpoTalk
    White Belt
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Somerville, MA
    Posts
    7
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Pekiti Tirsia Kali is a Filipino martial art from the Provinces of Panay and Negros Occidental, where the Tortal family developed and practiced it. The word “Pekiti” means ‘close’ in the Illongo dialect spoken in Negros Occidental, and “Tirsia” means ‘thirds’. Kali is one of many names for the Filipino martial arts in general. In the west, our idiomatic expression ‘Close Quarters’ would be the best translation of Pekiti Tirsia. Pekiti Tirsia was officially founded in 1897. The art has its start with Norberto Tortal, who taught his son Segundino Tortal. Segundino taught the art to his five sons; Balbino, Tedorico, Francisco, Quirino, and Conrado. These five went on to train in and/or fight against many of the prevalent styles of combat in the Philippines. They then took what they learned and formulated counter and re-counter techniques and principles to round out their family art. This ‘process’ is what gave us the large breadth and depth of Pekiti Tirsia as it exists today. Conrado Tortal was chosen as the principal heir, and he taught his grandson Leo Tortal Gaje, who inherited the art upon Conrado’s death. Tuhon (a title in Pekiti Tirsia which best translates as ‘system heir or system master’) Leo Gaje came to the United States in 1972 and began teaching Pekiti Tirsia in New York. Tuhon William McGrath began studying with Tuhon Leo Gaje in 1975 and was promoted to Tuhon in 1994 – completing the entire system of Pekiti Tirsia and becoming the first person outside of the Tortal family to achieve this rank.

    Pekiti Tirsia contains the following categories of training –

    • Footwork
    • Single Stick / Single Sword
    • Double Stick / Double Sword
    • Sword & Dagger / Stick & Dagger
    • Spear / Staff
    • Single Knife
    • Double Knife
    • Empty Hands

    [FONT=Times New Roman]Pekiti Tirsia has three sets of three principles that drive its strategies, techniques, etc. –[/FONT

    1 – Three Ranges: A practitioner is taught drills, techniques, principles, and strategies that address the three main ranges of combat – long, medium, and close. Close range is often taught first as this is the most difficult and dangerous.

    2 – Three Levels: After one is taught a particular drill, technique, principle, or strategy – one is taught a counter to that technique, and then a re-counter to that counter. This trains the individual to always be aware of possible counters and to always think at least three moves ahead.

    3 – Three Opponents: The techniques, principles, and strategies within Pekiti Tirsia always assume you may be facing at least three opponents. Therefore, techniques etc. that concentrate too much on a single opponent are avoided – and one’s awareness is increased.

    Pekiti Tirsia Kali


    Outline


    I – Footwork

    &#216; Sidestepping (90 and 180)
    &#216; Ducking (squatting, kneeling, and low-work)
    &#216; Forward Triangle
    &#216; Reverse Triangle
    &#216; Wave-in/wave-out
    &#216; Take-offs
    &#216; Ranging
    &#216; “L” Pattern
    &#216; “M” Pattern
    &#216; “N” Pattern
    &#216; “W” Pattern
    &#216; Complex Patterns (open diamond, closed diamond, hourglass, box)

    II – Solo Baston

    &#216; Abcedario (12 sets of 12 striking sets)
    &#216; 64 Attacks (form plus associated drills and applications)
    - Abcedario / Sabay Sabay nga Sugod (12 strikes / 6 basic strikes)
    - Apat na Paligid (four wall counter-offensive techniques and drills)
    - Payong (umbrella counter-offensive techniques and drills)
    - Dakup Y Puno / Chekete / Echekete (direct and indirect thrusting counters and timing drills)
    - Limang Sugod (five attacks, diagonal attacks, entries, counter to counter drills)
    - Pasok Lo’ob Pasak Labas / Segang Labo (break-in and break-out entry drills / close quarter engagement drill as a platform for close quarter techniques)
    - Pitong Sugod (entry slashes with off-balancing and takedown techniques)
    - Orasson (clock system, using the flat of the blade strikes known as “witiks”)
    - Florete (circular doubling attacks used to clear or re-direct opponent’s attack)
    &#216; Florete (form with applications)
    &#216; Seguidas I (set of 12 techniques that bridge the gap from long range)
    &#216; Seguidas II (set of 12 techniques that bridge the gap from medium range)
    &#216; Seguidas III (set of 12 techniques that bridge the gap from close range)
    &#216; Contradas I (set of 12 techniques that utilize quick hits and footwork)
    &#216; Contradas II (set of 12 techniques like the first set, only expanded for multiple opponents)
    &#216; Contradas III (set of 12 techniques countering Seguidas set I)
    &#216; Recontras I (set of 12 techniques utilizing entries into arm breaks etc.)
    &#216; Recontras II (set of 12 techniques utilizing two hands on the stick for hits etc.)
    &#216; Recontras III (set of 12 techniques utilizing takedowns and strikes with the left hand)
    &#216; Alphabito (set of 26 techniques based on the shape of letters attacking the opponent’s left arm)
    &#216; Numerado (set of 10 techniques based on the shape of numbers attacking the opponent’s knees)
    &#216; Offensa-Defensa—Defensa-Offensa (set of 12 techniques to counter the opponent’s attacks to weapon arm in mid-strike)
    &#216; Pekiti Disarma (set of 30 disarms, 30 counters, and 30 re-counters – broken down into empty hand, knife, or single stick vs. single stick)

    III – Doble Baston

    &#216; Dirty Dozen’ (set of 12 warm-ups for coordination and intro to doble baston)
    &#216; 12 Attacks (set of 12 attack patterns)
    &#216; 12 Drills (set of 12 drills and applications of the 12 attacks)
    &#216; 12 Disarms (set of 12 doble baston vs. doble baston disarms)
    &#216; Contradas (set of 12 techniques utilizing footwork and quick-hits etc.)
    &#216; Recontras (set of 12 techniques utilizing power hits and grappling)

    IV – Espada Y Daga
    (sak-sak = hammer or forward grip. pakal = ice pick or reverse grip)

    Level I (both you and your opponent have dagas in sak-sak)

    &#216; Level I Attacks (set of 12 attacks w/ daga in sak-sak)
    &#216; Level I Disarms (set of 12 disarms for stick and 12 for knife)
    &#216; Level I Contradas (set of 12 techniques emphasizing counters, footwork, and multiple striking)
    &#216; Level I Recontras (set of 12 techniques emphasizing power hits and direct counters)

    Level II (you have daga in pakal while your opponent has daga in sak-sak)

    &#216; Level II Attacks (set of 12 attacks w/ daga switching from sak-sak to pakal)
    &#216; Level II Disarms (set of 6 disarms for stick and 6 for knife)
    &#216; Level II Contradas (set of 12 techniques emphasizing counters, footwork, and multiple striking)
    &#216; Level II Recontras (set of 12 techniques emphasizing power hits and direct counters)

    Level III (both you and your opponent have dagas in pakal)

    &#216; Level III Attacks (set of 12 attacks w/ daga in pakal)
    &#216; Level III Disarms (set of 6 disarms for stick and 6 for knife)
    &#216; Level III Contradas (set of 12 techniques emphasizing counters, footwork, and multiple striking)
    &#216; Level III Recontras (set of 12 techniques emphasizing power hits and direct counters)

    V – Solo Daga

    &#216; Empty Hand vs. Knife Level I (empty hand vs. sak-sak)
    &#216; Level I (sak-sak vs. sak-sak)
    &#216; Level II (pakal vs. sak-sak)
    &#216; Empty Hand vs. Knife Level II (empty hand vs. pakal)
    &#216; Level III (pakal vs. pakal)
    &#216; Finishers (daga vs. empty hands)


    VI – Doble Daga

    &#216; Level I (double sak-sak vs. double sak-sak)
    &#216; Level II (pakal sak-sak vs. double sak-sak)
    &#216; Level III (pakal sak-sak vs. pakal sak-sak)
    &#216; Level IV (double pakal vs. double sak-sak)
    &#216; Level V (double pakal vs. double pakal)
    &#216; Doble Baston Applications (doble baston disarms done with doble daga vs. doble baston)

    VII – Sibat Lanab (spear)

    &#216; Set I (12 techniques based on Seguidas set I)
    &#216; Set II (12 techniques based on Seguidas set II)
    &#216; Set III (12 techniques based on Seguidas set III – vs. sword & counter grabs etc.)

    VIII – Pangamut (empty hands)

    &#216; Tempering & Kickboxing (basic conditioning and striking with footwork)
    &#216; Abcedario De Mano (12 sets of 12 strikes and applications)
    &#216; Pekiti De Mano (12 sets of five entries with 12 finishing breaks and throws)
    &#216; Pekiti Disarma (set of 30 disarms, 30 counters, and 30 recounters for empty hand vs. baston)

    I hope this helps regarding Pekiti Tirsia.

    -wes tasker



    Post was edited to change color to make it readable by all members, no content was changed
    Rob Broad
    KenpoTalk Global Moderator
    Last edited by Rob Broad; 02-12-2006 at 04:12 PM.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    2,270
    Thanks
    237
    Thanked 113 Times in 95 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Thank you for the indepth look at this art. It seems very fasinating.
    "To hear is to doubt. To see is to be deceived. But to feel is to believe." -- SGM Ed Parker

    "Sic vis pacem parabellum - If you want peace, prepare for war." -- "The Punisher"


    "Praying Mantis, very good. . . For catching bugs." --Jackie Chan

    "A horse stance is great for taking a dump" --Jet Li

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Kennewick, WA
    Posts
    1,010
    Thanks
    143
    Thanked 711 Times in 384 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    I have previously studied BJJ and am currently a student of Pekiti-Tirsia Kali. It is probably fair to say that I am currently more focused on my kali studies than my kenpo.

    Another site with information on PTK:

    http://www.pt-go.com/history_intro.asp

    I'd highly recommend anyone who has an interest in bladed weapon use/defense attend a PTK seminar, it can be quite the eye-opener.

    Lamont
    Pekiti Tirsia Kali and Kenpo Karate
    www.blackbirdmartialarts.com

    “He, who will not reason, is a bigot; he, who cannot, is a fool; and he, who dares not, is a slave.”
    ~William Drummond

    "This person is as dangerous as an IED."

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Baltimore, Maryland
    Posts
    2,270
    Thanks
    237
    Thanked 113 Times in 95 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    Quote Originally Posted by Blindside
    I have previously studied BJJ and am currently a student of Pekiti-Tirsia Kali. It is probably fair to say that I am currently more focused on my kali studies than my kenpo.

    Another site with information on PTK:

    http://www.pt-go.com/history_intro.asp

    I'd highly recommend anyone who has an interest in bladed weapon use/defense attend a PTK seminar, it can be quite the eye-opener.

    Lamont
    Are there any seminars coming to Baltimore or West Virginia.
    "To hear is to doubt. To see is to be deceived. But to feel is to believe." -- SGM Ed Parker

    "Sic vis pacem parabellum - If you want peace, prepare for war." -- "The Punisher"


    "Praying Mantis, very good. . . For catching bugs." --Jackie Chan

    "A horse stance is great for taking a dump" --Jet Li

  20. #20
    cameypsaromatis's Avatar
    cameypsaromatis is offline
    KenpoTalk
    Adv. Blue Belt
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Dallas
    Posts
    431
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts

    Default Re: Follow Up

    I'd like to learn more in ...
    Jiu-Jitsu, Aikido and Kendo
    -Camey

    "You mean, you'll put down your rock and I'll put down my sword, and we'll try and kill each other like civilized people? "

    SUPPORT KENPOTALK:http://www.kenpotalk.com/forum/payments.php

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Set: Kicking Set 1
    By Rob Broad in forum Ed Parker Kenpo
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-23-2006, 04:58 PM
  2. Long Form 6
    By Rob Broad in forum Ed Parker Kenpo
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-23-2006, 04:28 PM
  3. Long Form 5
    By Rob Broad in forum Ed Parker Kenpo
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-23-2006, 04:14 PM
  4. Long Form 4
    By Rob Broad in forum Ed Parker Kenpo
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-23-2006, 03:43 PM

Search tags for this page (caching method: table, memcache)

dakup y puno

Click on a term to search our site for related topics.