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Thread: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

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    Default June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    OPENING:
    1. Attention Stance
    2. Bow.
    3. Signify.
    4. Step your left foot to a meditative horse stance.



    1. Step your right foot forward into a right neutral bow as you execute a right inward block. Execute a outward handsword to 12 o'clock. Shift into a forward bow as you execute a left palm strike to head level. (Your right hand should be cocked at your hip.) As you shift back into a right neutral bow, execute a right inverted horizontal punch to the mid-section.

    2. Step your left foot forward into a left neutral bow as you execute a left inward block. Execute a left outward handsword to 12 o'clock. Shift into a forward bow as you execute a right palm strike to head level. (Your left hand should be cocked at your hip.) As you shift into a right neutral bow, execute a left inverted horizontal punch to the mid-section.

    3. Pull your left foot back to your right as you face 12 o'clock in a cat stance. (Your hands cocked at your right hip, left on top, right palm up.)

    4. Step your left foot to 9 o'clock into a left neutral bow as you execute a left outward block and a right reverse punch. Execute a left jab. Snap it back as you execute a right reverse punch. Execute another left jab as you simultaneously execute a left knife-edge kick, landing in a left neutral bow.

    5. Pull your right foot your left so you are in a cat stance facing 12 o'clock. (Your hands should be at your left hip, right on top, left palm up.)

    6. Step your right foot to 3 o'clock into a right neutral bow as you execute a right outward block and a left reverse punch. Execute a right jab. Snap it back as you execute a left reverse punch. Execute a right jab simultaneous with a right knife-edge kick, landing in a right neutral bow.

    7. Pull your left foot to your right into a cat stance facing 12 o'clock. (Your hands should be cocked at your right hip, left on top, right palm up.)

    8. Step your left foot to 5 o'clock into a left neutral bow facing 6 o'clock as you execute a universal block (with the right hand as the inward block.)

    9. Shift into a left forward bow facing 6 o'clock as you simultaneously execute a left upward block and a right back hammerfist to the groin (to 6 o'clock).

    10. Turn your upward block into a overhand claw followed by a right backfist. Execute a left backfist and followed by a right backfist.

    11. Pull your right foot to your left and step your right foot to 12 o'clock into a right neutral bow facing 12 o'clock as you execute a universal block (with the left hand as the inward block.)

    12. Shift into a right forward bow facing 12 o'clock as you simultaneously execute a right upward block and a left back hammerfist to the groin (to 12 o'clock).

    13. Turn your upward block into an overhead claw followed by a left backfist. Execute a right backfist followed by a left backfist.

    14. Step your right foot to 10:30 in a left neutral bow facing 4:30 as your left backfist drops into a left downward block. Continue this motion as you execute a left overhead looping back knuckle strike to the back of your attacker's head. Chamber your looping backfist and pivot into a left forward bow as you execute a right reverse punch. Execute a right front thrust kick and left jab.

    15. Land forward to 4:30 and pivot into a right neutral bow as you execute a midrange right vertical thrust punch.

    16. Step your right foot to 7:30 into a right neutral bow as you execute a right downward block. Continue this motion as you execute a right overhead looping back knuckle strike to the back of your opponent's head. Chamber your right back knuckle strike and pivot into a right forward bow as you execute a left reverse punch. Execute a left front thrust kick and a right jab.

    17. Land forward to 7:30 and pivot into a left neutral bow as you execute a midrange left vertical thrust punch.

    18. Step to 1:30 as you execute a left overhead chopping punch to 1:30 (target could be the bridge of an attacker's nose) simultaneous with a left retarded ball kick to knee level.

    19. Land in a twist stance and step out into a right neutral bow as you execute a right uppercut into a forearm strike. Execute a left one-finger eye poke. Using this as a gauge, execute a right one-finger eye poke. Instantly follow that with a left one-finger eye poke.

    20. Step to 10:30 as you execute a right overhead chopping punch to 10:30 (target could again be the bridge of an attacker's nose) simultaneous with a right retarded ball kick to knee level.

    21. Land in a twist stance and step out into a left neutral bow as you execute a left upper cut into a forearm strike. Execute a right one-finger eye poke. Using this as a gauge, execute a left one-finger eye poke. Follow that with another right one-finger eye poke.

    22. Execute a left inward downward block (palm up) as you step into a rear twist stance towards 4:30. Unwind into a right neutral bow facing 10:30 as you execute a right uppercut.

    23. Execute a right inward downward block (palm up) as you step into a rear twist stance towards 4:30. Unwind into a left neutral bow facing 10:30 as you execute a left uppercut.

    24. Step your right foot back to 7:30 into a left neutral bow as you execute a left inward downward block (palm down). Convert it to a left vertical back knuckle strike.

    25. Step your left foot back to 7:30 into a right neutral bow as you execute a right inward downward block (palm down). Covert it to a right vertical back knuckle strike.

    26. Pivot into a right forward bow as you execute a left push down block. Pivot in place into a twist stance. Step your left foot to 1:30 into a left neutral bow as execute a left outward ovrhead elbow strike. Follow that with a left overhead claw.

    27. Pivot into a left forward bow as you execute a right push down block. Pivot in place into a twist stance. Step your right foot to 1:30 into a right neutral bow as you execute a right outward overhead elbow strike. Follow that with a right overhead claw.

    28. Pivot into a right forward bow as you execute a left push down block. Pivot in place into a twist stance. Step your left foot to 1:30 into a left neutral bow as you execute a left outward overhead elbow strike. Follow that with a left overhead claw.

    29. Execute a right thrust punch to 1:30. Follow that by executing a left inward forearm strike.

    30. Step your left foot into a rear crossover towards 7:30. Unwind so you are a right neutral bow facing 1:30 as you execute an inward overhead elbow.

    31. Step your right foot into a rear crossover to 7:30. As you unwind into a left neutral bow facing 1:30, execute a left inward overhead elbow.

    32. Step into a rear crossover towards 9:00. Unwind as you execute a right inward elbow and a left palm heel strike. (An elbow sandwich that slides through to cock for the next move.)

    33. Execute two simultaneous outward elbows.

    34. Chamber the left arm and collapse the right arm against your body, chambered for a back elbow. Execute a right back elbow and a left upward elbow.


    35. Go to a meditative horse stance.

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    A very good written description of the form, as I understand it.

    In steps 4 and 6 you reference a punch as a 'reverse punch' ... this is not a term I have heard in this manner before. I have always heard these strikes referenced as 'horizontal punch'. Can you clarify your term?

    In steps 15 and 17, I was taught this as a 'buckle punch' - land from the kick on your heel, buckle the leg when you put the ball of your foot down, at an angle to trap the attackers foot, with the punch. I recently heard this punch was the 'low jab' punch ... and not the 'mid-range vertical thrust punch', that I always executed there.

    (in steps 14 & 16, again, the kick/punch, at our school is not described as a jab, but rather a horizontal punch).

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Broad


    11. Pull your right foot to your left and step your right foot to 12 o'clock into a right neutral bow facing 12 o'clock as you execute a universal block (with the left hand as the inward block.)

    12. Shift into a right forward bow facing 12 o'clock as you simultaneously execute a right upward block and a left back hammerfist to the groin (to 12 o'clock).


    I have a little different angles for the upward block and hammerfist. I do the universal to 12, but the block and hammerfist to about 2.


    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Broad
    18. Step to 1:30 as you execute a left overhead chopping punch to 1:30 (target could be the bridge of an attacker's nose) simultaneous with a left retarded ball kick to knee level.

    19. Land in a twist stance and step out into a right neutral bow as you execute a right uppercut into a forearm strike. Execute a left one-finger eye poke. Using this as a gauge, execute a right one-finger eye poke. Instantly follow that with a left one-finger eye poke.

    22. Execute a left inward downward block (palm up) as you step into a rear twist stance towards 4:30. Unwind into a right neutral bow facing 10:30 as you execute a right uppercut.


    I don't know that I've seen the retarded ball kick. Maybe I'm not picturing it well, but I don't believe I do one. And after the overhead punch, I land with a rising forearm strike under the chin. (God, I love those) and I don't do an uppercut there, I believe I do a vertical punch.

    On the pushdown blocks, I think I would only add that I do a c-step around the attacker before doing the elbow to the chest. I also make sure that at the same time I do the twist stance, the hand that's doing the elbow comes up to my ear (palm in.)


    I have a few other little differences here and there, but those are the big ones.

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    We basically do the same thing. The difference is that we call this Form 2 Level 1. Our Level 2 fallows mostly the same patterns, but has a lot of inserts.

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Understanding the timing separation of "distance with rotation" and then "rotation with distance" in Long Form 2 is a critical aspect to your form. When we advance we use "rotation with distance" and when we retreat we use "distance with rotation."

    Long Form 2 is the first form to introduce an orbital switch as well as a universal block. The form also introduces the principle, "When a move is compounded, only one stance movement is necessary."

    Notice that the hand isolation movements at the end of Long Form 1 (i.e. inside downward blocks, pushdowns) are now used in a more intricate manner in Long Form 2, and that the elbows employed in Long Form 2 give a message of what is to come in later forms. The chamber hands and inward overhead elbows near the end of the form are grab and pull movements done in succession.
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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Resurection time for an oldie, but I'm reworking this form (Long 2) to accomodate some physical problems. Before I change too much, though, I want to ask the opinions of the KT community for some honest (brutally honest is ok, if you think it necessary) input. I want to move a little cautiously in changing things I might not completely understand. Also, understand that this is for my use and to keep me going. I'm not teaching anyone else, nor advocating anyone change their method.

    1. Step your right foot forward into a right neutral bow as you execute a right inward block. Execute a outward handsword to 12 o'clock. Shift into a forward bow as you execute a left palm strike to head level. (Your right hand should be cocked at your hip.) As you shift back into a right neutral bow, execute a right inverted horizontal punch to the mid-section.

    2. Step your left foot forward into a left neutral bow as you execute a left inward block. Execute a left outward handsword to 12 o'clock. Shift into a forward bow as you execute a right palm strike to head level. (Your left hand should be cocked at your hip.) As you shift into a right neutral bow, execute a left inverted horizontal punch to the mid-section.
    Is there a reason (or reasons) for chambering the off hand? It is done throughout this (and other) forms, but we seldome do it in techniques or sparing- and never without specific, logical reasons for it.

    Dan C
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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    I was taught 4 & 6 a little differently, but since I'm reworking it, I'd apreciate your input. ( For the record, we did a vertical outward block- targets were solar plex, face, ribs, ribs & shin).

    [quote]
    4. Step your left foot to 9 o'clock into a left neutral bow as you execute a left outward block and (a.) a right reverse punch. Execute (b.) a left jab. Snap it back as you execute (c.) a right reverse punch. Execute (d.)another left jab as you simultaneously execute (e.) a left knife-edge kick, landing in a left neutral bow. [/quote]

    What are your targets for:

    (a.) right reverse punch
    (b.) left jab
    (c.) right reverse punch
    (d.) left jab
    (e.) left knife-edge kick

    Were you taught an outward or a vertical outward block? What is the reasoning for your method?

    Is there a reason this serries of strikes is delivered without stance changes (except the first and last strikes)?

    Execute another left jab as you simultaneously execute a left knife-edge kick, landing in a left neutral bow.
    I've never understood the utility of this movement. Can any of you enlighten me as to why it is there? Is there a practical application of this movement that doesn't leave you exposed to some type of nastiness? Does it teach something that I'm missing? It feels sharp when I do it, and it looks ok. But I've never really understood it.

    Dan C
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    Question Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    "...10. Turn your upward block into a overhand claw followed by a right backfist. Execute a left backfist and followed by a right backfist...."


    Ummm...am I the only one that has actually channelled Barry Gibs while doing this manuever?

    For some unfathomable reason, this always felt like a dance sequence from Saturday Night Fever.

    I'm embarrassed to say we've strayed from the path and modified this technique to a single rear hand vertical punch and a lead outward back knuckle as opposed to the rolling, triple back-knuckles...as by and large I have tried to tamper very little with the few EPAK forms we share, but I never felt real groovy doin' that sequence)

    I was also originally taught spear hands vs the "
    nverted horizontal punch to the mid-section" in the opening technique, but by and large most of the rest reads remarkably similar, with the exception of a few bows here and there.
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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan View Post
    IWere you taught an outward or a vertical outward block? What is the reasoning for your method?

    Is there a reason this serries of strikes is delivered without stance changes (except the first and last strikes)?

    I've never understood the utility of this movement. Can any of you enlighten me as to why it is there? Is there a practical application of this movement that doesn't leave you exposed to some type of nastiness? Does it teach something that I'm missing? It feels sharp when I do it, and it looks ok. But I've never really understood it.
    Perhaps ... too many questions for one post ... maybe I'll be able to spend a bit more time later, but I'll try some quick answers here.

    The outward block is a vertical outward block. This block remains in the system to carry it forward for historical purposes.

    The stance used is related to the power principle used. In this series, we are utilizing backup mass as the primary power principle. In Long 1, when we moved to 9 and 3, we showed torque as the power principle (Block and then punch - "When ever the power principle is torque, we say 'base, pivot'.") With backup mass as the power principle, we do not need the stance change. (remember the blocks at the end of Long 1, rear hand block without stance change).


    The Jab with the kick:

    This move demonstrates that we can jab with the foot, in the same manner we can jab with the hand. Remember, a jab has no cocking motion, it is fired forward from where it is. The kick here must act as a jab; fire it forward from where it is. Don't draw back to a cat before the kick. You should feel as if you are falling forward.

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan
    Is there a reason (or reasons) for chambering the off hand?
    The chop is a slicing downward chop that we are torqueing through its entire range. This slicing chop pulls the left heel palm to the opponent. Many people execute this outward chop more like Delayed Sword .. striking and stopping at the neck. I learned to slice through the neck, more like Leaping Crane. As we execute this sequence of attacks, we are pivoting our stance and body as well. The block chop cock motion assists in the correct body mechanics.

    That's my two cents. Hope it helps.

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by SifuDangeRuss View Post
    "...10. Turn your upward block into a overhand claw followed by a right backfist. Execute a left backfist and followed by a right backfist...."

    I'm embarrassed to say we've strayed from the path and modified this technique to a single rear hand vertical punch and a lead outward back knuckle as opposed to the rolling, triple back-knuckles...
    I was taught to do this as downward/upward simultaneouse blocks from a neutral bow, pivoting to a forward bow with an overhead parry and a simultaneouse reverse hammerfist to the groin. Then, pivot to a neutral bow as you downward heel palm strike the bridge of his nose and replace it with a vertical backfist as the stance solidifies- then the outward back knuckles to opposite temples.

    Dan C
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    SifuDangeRuss is offline
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    Smile Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan View Post
    I was taught to do this as downward/upward simultaneouse blocks from a neutral bow, pivoting to a forward bow with an overhead parry and a simultaneouse reverse hammerfist to the groin. Then, pivot to a neutral bow as you downward heel palm strike the bridge of his nose and replace it with a vertical backfist as the stance solidifies- then the outward back knuckles to opposite temples.

    Dan C
    This ending makes more sense than the way I was taught, thank you.

    I was taught to do this as downward/upward simultaneouse blocks from a neutral bow, pivoting to a forward bow with an overhead parry and a simultaneouse (Hip Check). Then, pivot to a neutral bow as you downward heel palm (Claw) strike the bridge of his nose...then we went into the BeeGees Back-Knuckles.
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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by michaeledward View Post
    The outward block is a vertical outward block. This block remains in the system to carry it forward for historical purposes.
    So, you are saying that it is only there for tradition? An interesting idea. I've often argued that it is a weak block, and others more experienced than me have told me it should be used more like a parry. I practice it more like a double bone block/parry, where it comes up more like a boxers guard.

    The stance used is related to the power principle used. In this series, we are utilizing backup mass as the primary power principle. ... "When ever the power principle is torque, we say 'base, pivot'." With backup mass as the power principle, we do not need the stance change.
    Don't you need to get the mass in motion- as with a foot maneuver or yielding? This may just be a different breakdown of terms, but I look at this serries as useing mostly muscle mass to generate power, which is different from backup mass. I guess that's why Im questioning it. Kenpo teaches us to let our stances and footwork do most of the work for us. But, here we are striking with only muscular force- a serries of minor moves which do not set us or him up for a major strike.

    The Jab with the kick:
    This move demonstrates that we can jab with the foot, in the same manner we can jab with the hand. Remember, a jab has no cocking motion, it is fired forward from where it is. The kick here must act as a jab; fire it forward from where it is. Don't draw back to a cat before the kick. You should feel as if you are falling forward.
    I do feel like I'm falling to the side I kick/punch to. You've hit on a big reason I questioned the move. We are taught to move in ballance, but here we overcommit. As soon as this move starts, we are over the line of no return and commited to that direction. Another reason is that I think punching to the side is anatomically unsound. But, I was wrong once before, so ...

    The chop is a slicing downward chop that we are torqueing through its entire range. This slicing chop pulls the left heel palm to the opponent. Many people execute this outward chop more like Delayed Sword .. striking and stopping at the neck. I learned to slice through the neck, more like Leaping Crane. As we execute this sequence of attacks, we are pivoting our stance and body as well. The block chop cock motion assists in the correct body mechanics.
    That makes a lot of sense- especially the slicing handsword instead of a thrusting handsword. Thanks. I'm just not sure about comeing to full chamber instead of guard/check. Is there some reason, anatomically or training wise, or other, to go to chamber? Comeing to guard feels more solid and seems more functional to me regardless which type handsword is used.

    That's my two cents. Hope it helps.
    Helps more than .02 worth (I'll just have to owe you, though). I may be digging a little too much, but it is the details that make forms worthwhile studying. And, if I'm going to consider changing anything, I'd like to be sure what I'm doing. That kick/punch-jab, for example, sets my shoulder on fire to do it. But, there's always the possibility I'm doing something wrong or that I can find a suitable way to do the same thing. So, before trying to modify it I need to know a.) it is useful enough to bother with, and b.) that I understand what I'm trying to do in the first place.

    Thanks for the response, and I look forward to anything else you have to say about it.

    Dan C
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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by SifuDangeRuss View Post
    This ending makes more sense than the way I was taught, thank you.
    No prob! I like this method because it flows well and just feels right. The entire sequence just rolls into the poor sod!

    Dan C

    Edit: by the way, it also continues the theme of changing weapon configurations from this same directional sequence in Short 2.
    Last edited by thedan; 11-05-2006 at 09:37 PM.
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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan View Post
    So, you are saying that it is only there for tradition? An interesting idea. I've often argued that it is a weak block, and others more experienced than me have told me it should be used more like a parry. I practice it more like a double bone block/parry, where it comes up more like a boxers guard.
    Yes, it is a weak block. There are times when the vertical outward is used as a parry - Destructive Twins is a good example.

    I have heard that the Vertical Outward, from Short 1 on, is used to preserve history. I wasn't there, so, I am definately not a definative source.


    Quote Originally Posted by thedan
    Don't you need to get the mass in motion- as with a foot maneuver or yielding? This may just be a different breakdown of terms, but I look at this serries as useing mostly muscle mass to generate power, which is different from backup mass. I guess that's why Im questioning it. Kenpo teaches us to let our stances and footwork do most of the work for us. But, here we are striking with only muscular force- a serries of minor moves which do not set us or him up for a major strike.
    Remember the move immediately prior to the block punch. We draw to a 45 degree cat stance, and cup and saucer our hands on the right hip. From that cat stance, we (Step-Block-Punch) all in one move.

    We often see people Step : and then : Block-Punch.

    I have learned that this move is incorrect. If we break the move down to two beats, we are utilizing torque (Base Pivot). By combining all three actions in one beat, we make use of back-up mass ... our body weight moving in-line with the strike. All of our body is moving from a natural stance facing 12 to a neutral bow facing 9. (remember, the cat represents natural stance in the forms).

    The Punch should reach its full extention when the foot plants in the neutral bow.

    Good questions. I hope my answers are adequate. But, remember, I'm still just a knucklehead with a computer.

    Mike

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by michaeledward View Post
    Remember the move immediately prior to the block punch. We draw to a 45 degree cat stance, and cup and saucer our hands on the right hip. From that cat stance, we (Step-Block-Punch) all in one move. The Punch should reach its full extention when the foot plants in the neutral bow.
    True, the first strike/block combo has the mass in motion. It is the next two that don't. And the motion of that jab punch/kick combo violates directional harmony- the punch and kick go the same way, but the torso and head either hang in limbo or bob- as well as commiting you to either drop into his action or to rise up in your stance to prevent this.

    Good questions. I hope my answers are adequate. But, remember, I'm still just a knucklehead with a computer.
    Ain't we all- but thanks.

    Dan C
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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    18. Step to 1:30 as you execute a left overhead chopping punch to 1:30 (target could be the bridge of an attacker's nose) simultaneous with a left retarded ball kick to knee level.
    Amy, this ones for you! (The rest of you are more than welcome to answer, but I told Amy I was going to ask about this).

    Watching the video Amy posted on her school site (pretty good stuff, btw) I saw her deliver this punch on a mostly horizontal plane and with a weighted front/steping foot. I learned this as a looping overhead strike down onto the bridge of his nose at @ 45', and the foot steping into the twist is unweighted. This is a cavity strike, designed to knock out your opponent, as I was taught.

    How do you (Amy and the rest) do this strike? What is the intent of the strike with your method?

    Can anyone describe the "retarded ball kick to knee level"? That's a new one on me ... . Does it deliver just after the strike (sounds like it)? Is the kicking foot still in the air when the strike delivers, landing the kick just afterward? Or do you strike, then step and kick?

    Sorry for all the questions so close together. I'll be good and wait a while before asking more. Thanks.

    Dan C
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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan View Post
    True, the first strike/block combo has the mass in motion. It is the next two that don't. And the motion of that jab punch/kick combo violates directional harmony- the punch and kick go the same way, but the torso and head either hang in limbo or bob- as well as commiting you to either drop into his action or to rise up in your stance to prevent this.
    We move from 12 O'clock to 9 O'clock, with the back-up mass power principle 'Block-Punch'.

    Then we learn how to execute a 'jab with the front hand'. We also learn here that our rear hand should be pulled back to the pectoral muscle, because Kenpo forms put our hands in realistic position.

    Then we learn how to execute a 'jab with the rear hand'. Here we should be certain to keep the front weapon loaded and pointed at the target. (Don't point toward the ceiling)

    Then we learn how to execute a 'jab with a jab kick'.

    Throughout this sequence of moves, you should not be punching to the side. Face your work. Look to 9 O'clock. Strike to 9 O'clock. If you aren't looking where you are going, I would suggest you aren't doing the form correctly.

    Off to catch a plane now. Hope I am adding clarity, and not its opposite.

    Mike

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by michaeledward View Post
    Then we learn how to execute a 'jab with a jab kick'.

    Throughout this sequence of moves, you should not be punching to the side. Face your work. Look to 9 O'clock. Strike to 9 O'clock. If you aren't looking where you are going, I would suggest you aren't doing the form correctly.
    You may be right. I have a tendency to turn a little sideways, now that you said that.

    Thanks. Hope you have a good trip.

    Dan C
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by thedan View Post
    A
    Can anyone describe the "retarded ball kick to knee level"? That's a new one on me ... . Does it deliver just after the strike (sounds like it)? Is the kicking foot still in the air when the strike delivers, landing the kick just afterward? Or do you strike, then step and kick?

    Sorry for all the questions so close together. I'll be good and wait a while before asking more. Thanks.
    A couple of thoughts for you.

    The area of Long 2 that you are discussing is the first move from 7:30 to 1:30. At this area, we are implementing the Figure 8 in our hands on a vertical alignment. In short 2, when we worked on this line, our hands made the Figure 8 on the horizontal line.

    This area of Long 2, we are taught, is the first place in the forms where we become the aggressor. All the moves prior to this have been defensive with counters.

    This 'Chopping Knuckle Punch', executed on a vertical circle is very much like the attack in Raining Claw - substituting the punch for a heelpalm/claw. The punch pulls the face down into the uppercut punch which immediately follows.

    The kick you mention, takes place simultaneous with the 'Chopping Knuckle Punch'. Mr. Planas calls this kick a 'Thrusting Sweep Kick'.

    This 'Thrusting Sweep Kick - Chopping Knuckle Punch' lines up nicely with the 'Jab with the Hand - Jab with the Foot' we were talking about earlier. These are Dual Moves (form TWO). The first is a punch-kick dual move with the front weapon. The second is a punch-kick dual move with the rear weapon. In the first move - the kick and punch happen together ... sooo ... in the second move, the kick and punch happen together.

    Again, I ain't really all that smart. I've worked this form with my instructor quite a bit. Last Spring, I worked this a bit with Mr. Planas. I was embarrassed by how much he had to work with me on a form I have been doing for five years. He sent me to the wood shed on this form.

    Sincerely,

    K W C (knucklehead with computer)

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    Default Re: June 2006 Form Of The Month - Long Form 2

    Quote Originally Posted by michaeledward View Post
    Again, I ain't really all that smart. I've worked this form with my instructor quite a bit. Last Spring, I worked this a bit with Mr. Planas. I was embarrassed by how much he had to work with me on a form I have been doing for five years. He sent me to the wood shed on this form.
    I don't know, but it seems to me that half the trick to being smart is to figure out who to listen to, and the other half is being willing to listen in the first place. Lot of good information in that post. Thanks! Should keep me busy for a bit- I now have some corrections to make, too.

    Dan C
    There are things that are worth knowing for their own sake, worth finding for the pure joy of discovery.

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