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Thread: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

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    Default October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Striking Set 1

    Bow.

    Start from a horse stance facing 12 o'clock.


    Striking to the front:

    1. Execute a right thrust punch to face level. Execute a right vertical backknuckle to face level.

    2. Execute a left thrust punch to face level. Execute a left vertical backknuckle to face level.

    3. Execute a right thrust punch to face level. Execute a right invertedhammerfist to the groin level.

    4. Execute a left thrust punch to face level. Execute a left invertedhammerfist to the groin level.

    5. Execute a right thrust punch to face level. Execute a right backfist to thetemple.

    6. Execute a left thrust punch to face level. Execute a left backfist to thetemple.

    7. Execute a right thrust punch to face level. Execute a right inwardhammerfist to the ribs.

    8. Execute a left thrust punch to face level. Execute a left inward hammerfistto the ribs.


    Striking to the side:

    9. Execute a right vertical thrust punch to 3 o'clock to face level. Execute aright vertical back knuckle strike to face level.

    10. Execute a left vertical thrust punch to 9 o'clock to face level. Execute aleft vertical back knuckle strike to face level.

    11. Execute a right vertical thrust punch to 3 o'clock to face level. Execute aright inverted hammerfist to the groin.

    12. Execute a left vertical thrust punch to 9 o'clock to face level. Execute aleft inverted hammerfist to the groin.

    13. Execute a right vertical thrust punch to 3 o'clock to face level. Execute aright backfist to the temple.

    14. Execute a left vertical thrust punch to 9 o'clock to face level. Execute aleft backfist to the temple.

    15. Execute a right vertical thrust punch to 3 o'clock to face level. Execute aright inward hammerfist to the ribs.

    16. Execute a left vertical thrust punch to 9 o'clock to face level. Execute aleft inward hammerfist to the ribs.


    Double strikes to the front:

    17. Execute a right and a left thrust punch to 12 o'clock to face level.Simultaneously execute a right and a left back knuckle strike to face level.

    18. Execute a right and a left thrust punch to face level. Execute a right anda left inverted hammerfist to groin level.

    19. Execute a right and a left thrust punch to face level. Execute a right anda left backfist to the temple.

    20. Execute a right and a left thrust punch to face level. Execute a right anda left inward hammerfist to the ribs.


    Simultaneous strikes to the sides:

    21. Simultaneously execute a right vertical thrust punch to 3 o'clock to facelevel as you execute a left vertical punch to 9 o'clock to face level.Simultaneously execute a right back knuckle strike to face level as you executea left back knuckle strike to face level.

    22. Simultaneously execute a right vertical thrust punch to 3 o'clock to facelevel as you execute a left vertical punch to 9 o'clock to face level.Simultaneously execute a right inverted hammerfist to the groin as you executea left inverted hammerfist to the groin.

    23. Simultaneously execute a right vertical thrust punch to 3 o'clock to facelevel as you execute a left vertical punch to 9 o'clock to face level.Simultaneously execute a right backfist to the temple as you execute a leftbackfist to the temple.

    24. Simultaneously execute a right vertical thrust punch to 3 o'clock to facelevel as you execute a left vertical punch to 9 o'clock to face level.Simultaneously execute a right inward hammerfist to the ribs as you execute aleft inward hammerfist to the ribs.



    Double strikes to the front:

    25. Slide your left foot to your right into an attention stance with both ofyour knees slightly bent.

    26. Execute a right and a left thrust punch to face level.

    27. Execute a right and a left back knuckle to face level.

    28. Execute a right and a left inverted hammerfist to the groin.

    29. Execute a right and a left backfist to the temple.

    30. Execute a right and a left inward hammerfist to the ribs.

    Attention stance.
    Bow.
    Last edited by KirkS; 09-30-2019 at 03:22 PM.
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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    A very useful set, allowing you to practice a variety of basic strikes and how you may transition from one to another. In this, it actually has some fighting applications, such as when your punch is being blocked and you smoothly flow into one of those follow-ups. I recommend drilling this with a partner.

    As an aside, the 'simultaneous strikes to the sides' (no pun intended) in the write-up are 'double strikes' as well - I can see the reason for making a distinction here, however, a beginner may find this confusing without further explanation.

    All in all, above description is in line with the way I am doing this set myself, except that I execute
    all the punches to the mid-section rather than to face level - but that's just a matter of personal preference.

    The set can be used for the development of sophisticated body mechanics, if you/your instructor are aware of them.

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    A very useful set, allowing you to practice a variety of basic strikes and how you may transition from one to another. In this, it actually has some fighting applications, such as when your punch is being blocked and you smoothly flow into one of those follow-ups. I recommend drilling this with a partner.

    As an aside, the 'simultaneous strikes to the sides' (no pun intended) in the write-up are 'double strikes' as well - I can see the reason for making a distinction here, however, a beginner may find this confusing without further explanation.

    All in all, above description is in line with the way I am doing this set myself, except that I execute
    all the punches to the mid-section rather than to face level - but that's just a matter of personal preference.

    The set can be used for the development of sophisticated body mechanics, if you/your instructor are aware of them.
    And most of these movements, especially the "doubles" are anatomically inefficient and injurious to the body.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    And most of these movements, especially the "doubles" are anatomically inefficient and injurious to the body.
    Doc, I was just waiting for you to show up and say this!

    Well, first off, other martial arts have double strikes too. To illustrate, in Shotokan, we have the double punch (morote-tsuki) and the double hammerfist (hasami-uchi, e.g., in Bassai-dai).

    It is true that some of the strikes in the Striking Set are done at really akward angles. Personally, I take the liberty to adjust those a bit. Thus, I execute most of the sideways strikes to about 2:00 and 10:00 respectively.

    Are these functional moves? Hardly. But I primarily practice them for the opportunity to train my muscle coordination under unusual circumstances.

    I know that some practitioners skip them altogether. that's fine, I have no problem with that. Your practice should always make sense to you. In its adaptability lies the beauty of training in American Kenpo.

    On the other hand, if you (as a third-party reader) are struggling with the same questions I had in regards to this set, you may want to consider my conclusions.

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    Doc, I was just waiting for you to show up and say this!

    Well, first off, other martial arts have double strikes too. To illustrate, in Shotokan, we have the double punch (morote-tsuki) and the double hammerfist (hasami-uchi, e.g., in Bassai-dai).

    It is true that some of the strikes in the Striking Set are done at really akward angles. Personally, I take the liberty to adjust those a bit. Thus, I execute most of the sideways strikes to about 2:00 and 10:00 respectively.

    Are these functional moves? Hardly. But I primarily practice them for the opportunity to train my muscle coordination under unusual circumstances.

    I know that some practitioners skip them altogether. that's fine, I have no problem with that. Your practice should always make sense to you. In its adaptability lies the beauty of training in American Kenpo.

    On the other hand, if you (as a third-party reader) are struggling with the same questions I had in regards to this set, you may want to consider my conclusions.
    All of the "2" Sets were created by Jim Mitchell while putting together a video of all of the techniques for examination, (not as a definitive "how to" as some thought who got a copy), along with the bulk of the "extensions" after the first 32. They were never a hard part of the curriculum, but only suggestions like the rest of the material. Most ignored tham, and in my opinion, rightly so. The first 32 were not extensions in the beginning but how the technique was taught and executed. Commercialism brought a stretching or fleshing out of the material by cutting off the endings of the first 32 techniques and then teaching the endings as extensions at a higher level. This necessitated the creations of additional extensions to match the first 32.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Out of curiosity, what were the first 32 techniques? If I remember your history correctly, the techniques shown in SGM Parker's first book were the techniques required for brown belt.
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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by punisher73 View Post
    Out of curiosity, what were the first 32 techniques? If I remember your history correctly, the techniques shown in SGM Parker's first book were the techniques required for brown belt.
    Back in the Chinese Kenpo days, techniques began pretty much as they still are with "Clutching Feathers" being the first technique taught through "Charging Ram." This comprised the first chart of 32.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    Doc, I was just waiting for you to show up and say this!

    Well, first off, other martial arts have double strikes too. To illustrate, in Shotokan, we have the double punch (morote-tsuki) and the double hammerfist (hasami-uchi, e.g., in Bassai-dai).

    It is true that some of the strikes in the Striking Set are done at really akward angles. Personally, I take the liberty to adjust those a bit. Thus, I execute most of the sideways strikes to about 2:00 and 10:00 respectively.

    Are these functional moves? Hardly. But I primarily practice them for the opportunity to train my muscle coordination under unusual circumstances.

    I know that some practitioners skip them altogether. that's fine, I have no problem with that. Your practice should always make sense to you. In its adaptability lies the beauty of training in American Kenpo.

    On the other hand, if you (as a third-party reader) are struggling with the same questions I had in regards to this set, you may want to consider my conclusions.
    But see you're an Old School intelligent martial artist with more than "Kenpo" under your belt, so when you see or do something that doesn't seem right, you question it and if necessary modify it. After a fashion with no Ed Parker on the floor every class, for the Kenpo exclusive students the "manuals" became the bible of execution, (even though they don't teach "how" to do anything), and that's what everyone followed. I came from Ark Wong where execution were meticulously defined without variation as well like most traditional disciplines, so I too questioned everything. Plus I had the luxury of knowing who created what learning directly from EP so I watched some of the crap pushed into the art more for volume than the art itself.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

    "It's much easier to quote, than to know." - Ron Chapél


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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by punisher73 View Post
    Out of curiosity, what were the first 32 techniques?

    1. Clutching Feathers
    2. Triggered Salute
    3. Dance of Death
    4. Gift of Destruction
    5. Locking Horns
    6. Lone Kimono
    7. Glancing Salute
    8. Five Swords
    9. Scraping Hoof
    10. Grip of Death
    11. Crossing Talon
    12. Shielding Hammer
    13. Thrusting Salute
    14. Striking Serpent’s Head
    15. Locked Wing
    16. Obscure Wing
    17. Reversing Mace
    18. Buckling Branch
    19. Thrusting Prongs
    20. Twisted Twig
    21. Obscure Sword
    22. Repeating Mace
    23. Raining Claw
    24. Crashing Wings
    25. Captured Leaves
    26. Evading the Storm
    27. Twirling Wings
    28. Snapping Twig
    29. Leaping Crane
    30. Crushing Hammer
    31. Circling Wing
    32. Calming the Storm

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    But see you're an Old School intelligent martial artist with more than "Kenpo" under your belt, so when you see or do something that doesn't seem right, you question it and if necessary modify it. After a fashion with no Ed Parker on the floor every class, for the Kenpo exclusive students the "manuals" became the bible of execution, (even though they don't teach "how" to do anything), and that's what everyone followed. I came from Ark Wong where execution were meticulously defined without variation as well like most traditional disciplines, so I too questioned everything. Plus I had the luxury of knowing who created what learning directly from EP so I watched some of the crap pushed into the art more for volume than the art itself.
    Well, who has once said: "Kenpo is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an conundrum", Doc?

    You know, I just love unwrapping riddles! And in the case of Kenpo, I continue to find eminently useful stuff as I do so - sometimes even in what looked awkward and non-sensical at first.

    Was it simply born out of a necessity to provide enough material for running a network of commercial schools? Or did Mr. Parker put it (or at least leave it) there in order to get us thinking and give us something we can mess with, so we can are at our own conclusions?
    Does it even matter?

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    Well, who has once said: "Kenpo is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an conundrum", Doc?

    You know, I just love unwrapping riddles! And in the case of Kenpo, I continue to find eminently useful stuff as I do so - sometimes even in what looked awkward and non-sensical at first.

    Was it simply born out of a necessity to provide enough material for running a network of commercial schools? Or did Mr. Parker put it (or at least leave it) there in order to get us thinking and give us something we can mess with, so we can are at our own conclusions?
    Does it even matter?
    Unfortunately, it was about expansion into "Ed Parker's Kenpo Karate." Remember, there was a time in the Parker Lineage when there were only three belts, White, Brown, and Black. Then Green was added followed by Purple. For many Purple was the first belt before the 32 Chart was settled, but it still had the extensions intact. Then Blue was added and that was when you learned the first extensions under what was called "Blue/Green." Orange was next and then lastly Yellow which was completely out of synch with the rest because it was originally a women's self defense course until everyone else complained because yellow was only 10 techniques whereas everyone else had 32.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Crouching Tiger View Post
    1. Clutching Feathers
    2. Triggered Salute
    3. Dance of Death
    4. Gift of Destruction
    5. Locking Horns
    6. Lone Kimono
    7. Glancing Salute
    8. Five Swords
    9. Scraping Hoof
    10. Grip of Death
    11. Crossing Talon
    12. Shielding Hammer
    13. Thrusting Salute
    14. Striking Serpent’s Head
    15. Locked Wing
    16. Obscure Wing
    17. Reversing Mace
    18. Buckling Branch
    19. Thrusting Prongs
    20. Twisted Twig
    21. Obscure Sword
    22. Repeating Mace
    23. Raining Claw
    24. Crashing Wings
    25. Captured Leaves
    26. Evading the Storm
    27. Twirling Wings
    28. Snapping Twig
    29. Leaping Crane
    30. Crushing Hammer
    31. Circling Wing
    32. Calming the Storm
    The order of the middle of the chart changed as Mr. Parker attempted to adjust the techniques to fit the Web Of Knowledge rotation when he formalized the chart before breaking it down to 24. He never formally released his 16 chart version but I have his notes and it was his intent to do so. He went to 24 first because he didn't want to trigger a bunch of "quick" promotions. His intent was to stay with 24 for about 5 years he said.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

    "It's much easier to quote, than to know." - Ron Chapél


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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    Unfortunately, it was about expansion into "Ed Parker's Kenpo Karate." Remember, there was a time in the Parker Lineage when there were only three belts, White, Brown, and Black. Then Green was added followed by Purple. For many Purple was the first belt before the 32 Chart was settled, but it still had the extensions intact. Then Blue was added and that was when you learned the first extensions under what was called "Blue/Green." Orange was next and then lastly Yellow which was completely out of synch with the rest because it was originally a women's self defense course until everyone else complained because yellow was only 10 techniques whereas everyone else had 32.
    Interesting. Can you tell us how many techniques there were in the system at the various stages?

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    Interesting. Can you tell us how many techniques there were in the system at the various stages?
    In the beginning there was no set number, and techniques didn't even have names. It was more of a "do this" teaching. Then techniques began to take on nicknames like "5 Count" which eventually became 5 Swords even though the original version had more than 5. Go figure. Mr. Parker would work off 3x5 card notes he kept when he was training with Sifu Chow. This material is represented in 16mm film I have and in his first book, "Kenpo-Karate" published by Iron Man Industries in 1961. Then shortly after coming to the mainland and discovering the Chinese Arts he immersed himself in that culture, and stopped using the word "Karate" out of respect to the Chinese and that corruption of the meaning of the Kanji, only to bring the word back for commercial reasons and public recognition when he created EPKK. That shift can be seen to occur quickly as his next book only 2 years later was "Secrets of Chinese Karate" in 1963, where he tacked on Karate so the book would sell to the general public because Gung-fu, Chaúan-Fa, Kenpo, Kempo, etc were unknowns.

    When he finally began to codify the techniques into charts, there was only three of them at 32 apiece creating a codified system of 96 techniques. By breaking the techniques and removing the endings to the first 32 to be taught in the beginning as Blue/Green, extended the number of techniques by one chart to 128. Add a few so-called 2-man Brown Belt techniques, throw in the 10 Yellow and flesh out the rest of the chart extensions and you get to around 170. Then you dump some for various reasons and different levels, swap out some Yellow that changed a lot in the beginning, and you end up with around 160 give or take depending upon when you learned and who taught you.

    There are some that teach older material like some Yellow and Brown Belt technique he dropped altogether, (and a couple he renamed), but generally that is the Ed Parker Kenpo Karate System that exists today. Keeping in mind that "American Kenpo" was coloquial and not the actual name of the system. He had plans for his American Kenpo but never had time to implement that material. There are some who don't know it but are teaching elements of Mr. Parker's American kenpo like Martin Wheeler, Zack Whitson, and Todd Durgan. They put in the work and expanded their knowledge. Even Ed Parker II is doing elements of American Kenpo but obviously can't call it that lest it be confused with his Fathers commercial work. What he has done is completely unique to his work and efforts. But as Mr. Parker always said, "When you figure it out and you start to get to the top, it all starts to look the same for a reason no matter the source."
    Last edited by Doc; 4 Weeks Ago at 03:03 AM.
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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Thanks Doc for another load of great historic information! Let me see if I can get this completely straight...
    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    In the beginning there was no set number, and techniques didn't even have names. It was more of a "do this" teaching. Then techniques began to take on nicknames like "5 Count" which eventually became 5 Swords even though the original version had more than 5. Go figure. Mr. Parker would work off 3x5 card notes he kept when he was training with Sifu Chow. This material is represented in 16mm film I have and in his first book, "Kenpo-Karate" published by Iron Man Industries in 1961. Then shortly after coming to the mainland and discovering the Chinese Arts he immersed himself in that culture, and stopped using the word "Karate" out of respect to the Chinese and that corruption of the meaning of the Kanji, only to bring the word back for commercial reasons and public recognition when he created EPKK. That shift can be seen to occur quickly as his next book only 2 years later was "Secrets of Chinese Karate" in 1963, where he tacked on Karate so the book would sell to the general public because Gung-fu, Chaúan-Fa, Kenpo, Kempo, etc were unknowns. When he finally began to codify the techniques into charts, there was only three of them at 32 apiece creating a codified system of 96 techniques.
    White, brown and black were the three ranks associated with 32 techniques apiece? If so, were students being tested for White at the time?
    By breaking the techniques and removing the endings to the first 32 to be taught in the beginning as Blue/Green, extended the number of techniques by one chart to 128.
    Does this mean that Blue/Green was added to the system before any other rank/belt?What comprised the curriculum of the further ranks when they were introduced eventually? How many techniques were there in each of them at the time?
    Add a few so-called 2-man Brown Belt techniques, throw in the 10 Yellow and flesh out the rest of the chart extensions and you get to around 170. Then you dump some for various reasons and different levels, swap out some Yellow that changed a lot in the beginning, and you end up with around 160 give or take depending upon when you learned and who taught you.There are some that teach older material like some Yellow and Brown Belt technique he dropped altogether, (and a couple he renamed), but generally that is the Ed Parker Kenpo Karate System that exists today. Keeping in mind that "American Kenpo" was coloquial and not the actual name of the system. He had plans for his American Kenpo but never had time to implement that material. There are some who don't know it but are teaching elements of Mr. Parker's American kenpo like Martin Wheeler, Zack Whitson, and Todd Durgan. They put in the work and expanded their knowledge. Even Ed Parker II is doing elements of American Kenpo but obviously can't call it that lest it be confused with his Fathers commercial work. What he has done is completely unique to his work and efforts. But as Mr. Parker always said, "When you figure it out and you start to get to the top, it all starts to look the same for a reason no matter the source."

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    Thanks Doc for another load of great historic information! Let me see if I can get this completely straight...White, brown and black were the three ranks associated with 32 techniques apiece? If so, were students being tested for White at the time?
    No, in the beginning everything was very fluid and training centric. Although the three belts existed there was no set curriculum and no testing. You'd come to class one day and if you were wearing a white belt Mr. Parker might call you up and put a black stripe on it. We called them "tips." It was very informal with no testing. When he felt you needed to be promoted he just put a stripe on your belt or gave you a new one and kept going.

    Does this mean that Blue/Green was added to the system before any other rank/belt?What comprised the curriculum of the further ranks when they were introduced eventually? How many techniques were there in each of them at the time?[/QUOTE]

    Blue/Green was created for the extensions or the rest of the 32 techniques at Orange by that time. When he shifted to the 24 chart the last 8 became the first third of the Purple Extensions. There were no more extension beyond the first 32 at the time and the other 2 charts techniques were shorter, so those other extensions had yet to be created. Everyone seems to think that Mr. Parker sat down and created this from start to finish but in reality it was a gradual evolution asn he tried different things and the system was in a constant state of flux up to when he passed. I remember at one time Brown and Black was 20 techniques. Ultimately all of the extension material got moved to upper black to get the system out to a codified 5th degree level and the first chart became the extensions for 2nd Black. Then he began experimenting with Instructor Manuals and Notes to give teachers ideas of what to teach and how to approach the material. Some of it is an interesting read, and I have all his notes in my archives. Some of it is so old it can't be opened because it was in Microsoft Word version 1.0.

    Below is a sample paste from his Yellow Belt Instructor Notes he started on unedited just as he left it.

    NOTES ON THE YELLOW BELT TECHNIQUES


    1. DELAYED SWORD

    1. NAME: This technique derives its name from its basic sequence of movements. The chop (handsword) is delayed by the insertion of a kick prior to its use. Thus the name DELAYED SWORD.

    2. THEME: This technique was designed to teach you how to create distance while blocking your opponent's extended arm with your forward arm. You then can follow up with a longer range weapon (in this case a kick using the forward or lead leg) to a target that is farther removed from you. It also teaches you how to gauge distance with your kicking leg, which in turn enables you to properly gauge the distance of your extended hand weapon.

    3. THE ATTACK: In the IDEAL PHASE of the technique the attack is from the front. As your opponent grabs your lapel with his right hand, some of the WHAT IF factors that can occur are:

    a. His attacking arm may be bent when pulling you forward.
    b. His attacking arm may be straight and locked out.
    c. His attacking arm may be initially bent and then pushes you out.
    d. His right foot may be forward when grabbing.
    e. His left foot may be forward when grabbing.
    f. He may be leaning forward when grabbing.

    In addition, visualize the attack to be:

    g. a right push instead of a grab.
    h. a right punch instead of a grab.
    i. a two-hand grab.
    j. a two-hand push instead of a grab.
    k. a right kick followed by a right punch.
    l. others...........

    4. In your early stages of learning it is a good idea to utilize your more coordinated hand to the front when defending yourself.

    5. The transitory cat stance of your second move assures proper alignment, which in turn promotes accuracy. It also enhances the speed of your action in addition to allowing you to FORMULATE according to the prevailing circumstances.

    6. Learn to fully take advantage of body momentum via MARRIAGE OF GRAVITY (height) as well as forward momentum (depth) when executing your last move (right outward handsword).

    7. During the execution of your last handsword, angle your strike so that you diagonally cut down, through, and across your opponent's body to check his height, width, and depth zones.
    8. It is highly suggested that you also experiment with various methods of execution (thrusting vs snapping your right handsword on the last move).

    9. Familiarize yourself with the basic coordination levels of movement. Learn to increase the efficiency of your movements by adhering to the following:

    a. When moving back, utilize the opposite hand of the foot that steps back (opposite hand/opposite foot).
    b. When moving forward, utilize the same hand as the foot that moves forward (like hand/like foot).

    10. During the course of your last move, be sure that your left hand supports your second line of defense with a positional check.



    2. ALTERNATING MACES

    1. NAME: This technique was so named because of the rythmatic changes of action. Your hands alternate: front, then rear, and then front.

    2. THEME: This technique also familiarizes you with the importance of creating distance. As the name of the technique implies, you are to learn to alternate your hands: front, then rear, and then front. Likewise you are to learn how to alternate your selected targets. The technique introduces you to the study of how to use specific weapons to specific targets in a specific sequence of movements to calculate the reactions of your opponent.

    3. THE ATTACK: In the IDEAL attack your opponent pushes from the front. He attempts this by stepping through with a two-hand push to the chest. Some additional "what if" factors that can be contemplated are:

    a. The attack may be a low two-hand push.
    b. The attack may be a left push.
    c. It may be a left straight punch.
    d. It is possible that it can be a left cross wrist grab.
    e. It may commence as an attempted two-hand grab.

    4. Practice varying the timing and rhythm of your basic sequence.

    5. Vary the path of your final back knuckle strike by having it travel under your left arm, or over it. Study the benefits of each.

    6. Take special notice of how the height of your opponent's attacking hands influences your response.

    7. Explore the most effective way to pivot into a forward bow.
    8. Also learn to defend yourself against this attack without the use of a block.

    9. Build spontaneity by having your partner vary his attacks: right grab, right push, right punch, left push, left straight punch, two‑ hand push. Respond to these variables with a right inward block simultaneous with a left positional check. This method of practice will help you to internalize the concept that the same defense may be used on the inside of your opponent's right arm, as well as the outside of his left arm.
    When practicing with the same defense on the inside or outside of your opponent's arms, follow-up with sequences from either Delayed Sword or Alternating Maces as the situation dictates. The practice of blending these two techniques in the manner described will help you to internalize effective responses to diverse situations.

    10. Always seek knowledge that will help you cultivate useful variables. Consequently, to assist you in this undertaking, further expand your knowledge by having your partner vary the height of the following attacks: left pushes, left grabs, left straight punches, and two-hand pushes. Respond to these variables with a right inward block on the outside of your opponent's left arm simultaneous with a left positional check. This will teach you that the same defense may be used even though the height of the attack may vary.
    Follow-up your block with sequential movements from either Alternating Maces or the left side of Attacking Mace. Remember to consider all practical alternatives. Therefore, do not only select exposed target areas of significance, but consider your opponent's reactions. Failing to make the latter choice can produce adverse results. Hence, practice with foresight. Foresight is a major key in helping you make the right choice. Please observe that the above technique teaches you how to attack various height zones on your opponent.


    3. SWORD OF DESTRUCTION

    1. NAME: This technique gains its name, in part, from the powerful action of your last strike. The shape of the hand (natural weapon) resembles that of a sword.

    2. THEME: This technique teaches you to apply the theme of Delayed Sword on the inside of either arm.

    3. THE ATTACK: In the IDEAL PHASE of this technique, the attack is again from the front. Your opponent starts from a right fighting stance, and proceeds to step forward with his left leg while delivering a left roundhouse punch to your head. Study and learn to counter additional possibilities by visualizing:

    a.) the punch as being a hooking punch.
    b.) a straight punch.
    c.) a punch that travels on a different path.
    d.) a punch that seeks a different target.
    e.) the attack to be an attempted bear hug from the front.
    f.) a high left roundhouse kick.
    g.) a low left roundhouse kick.

    4. This technique is almost the mirror image of Delayed Sword. Please take special note of the footwork.

    5. Be aware of the possibility that your opponent's groin may not be open. Formulate other significant alternatives to this situation.

    6. Observe how the attitude of your attacking partner effects your response. Remedy each response accordingly. Learn to do this and you are well on your way to uncovering the merits of TAILORING.

    7. Build spontaneity by having your partner vary his attacks:

    a. Right hand (grab, push, or punch) and then left hand (straight or roundhouse punch). Respond to these variables with a right inward block followed by a right extended outward block. With each block utilize a left positional check.
    b. Left hand (straight or roundhouse punch) and then right hand (attempted grab, push, or punch). Respond to these variables with a right extended outward block followed by a right inward block. With each block utilize a left positional check.

    This method of practice will help you internalize the concept that the same hand may easily be used to defend on the inside of alternating punches, etc..

    When practicing defense with the same hand on the inside of your opponent's arms, follow up with sequences from either Delayed Sword or Sword of Destruction. The practice of blending these two techniques in the manner described will help you to internalize rapid responses to rapidly changing situations.


    4. DEFLECTING HAMMER

    1. NAME: The name of this technique originates from the hammering action of your initial block and the reaction that results from it.

    2. THEME: This technique teaches you how to create distance while employing an angle change. This is accomplished by your stepping away from, and out of the line of, your opponent's attack. Since your opponent is employing a long range weapon, emphasis is placed on the use of foot maneuvers. Foot maneuvers are stressed because of the multiple benefits that they offer; (1) an angle change that causes your body to be out of the line of attack, (2) simultaneous use of your foot maneuver and your blocking arm to insure the deflection of your opponent's attack, and (3) coordination of your foot maneuvers with your hand weapons.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique again teaches you that the attack is from the front. The attack is a right step through thrusting ball kick to your groin or midsection. Your opponent's intent is to kick through you while forcefully exerting all of his weight into his kick. As with the previous techniques, the study of other possible methods of employment should also be considered. View additional attacks as:


    a.) a low kick to your knees.
    b.) a right thrusting knife edge kick.
    c.) a right thrusting back heel kick.
    d.) a right spinning back heel kick.
    e.) a right low kick followed by a right punch to the head.
    f.) a high kick aimed to your head.
    g.) having your opponent's kick include foot maneuvers, shuffles,
    crossovers etc.

    4. Reduce the force of your opponent's kick by increasing the distance between the two of you.

    5. Getting out of the Line of Attack increases your ability to protect yourself against a low kick.

    6. While action is normally faster than reaction jamming your opponent's right biceps, during the second move of your sequence, can prevent your opponent from taking further action.

    7. Striking high generally entails checking low. To the contrary striking low generally requires checking high.

    8. Should your opponent immediately add a right punch to his right kick, it might be expedient for you to formulate a left inward block to the outside of your opponent's right arm. Your follow-up would then be a right inward elbow strike to his right lower ribs.

    9. Learn to flow with your technique. While you are encouraged to maintain crispness throughout your technique sequence practice consolidating all moves to look as if they were one.

    10. Use your opponent's Marriage of Gravity at the precise moment you employ your elbow strike. This illustrates the value of borrowed force.

    5. CAPTURED TWIGS

    1. NAME: "Twigs" is a symbolic term for arms. In this technique your arms are momentarily entrapped, thus the name Captured Twigs.

    2. THEME: This technique teaches you how flank movements can provide you with exceptional access to rear targets. It also teaches you how to adapt to an overwhelming attack in addition to recognizing the availability of targets and weapons.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique introduces you to an attack from the rear. The technique describes your opponent applying a bear-hug, from the rear, with both of your arms pinned near your biceps. As with the other techniques it is imperative that you study additional possibilities such as:

    a.) your opponent's arms being at your shoulder level.
    b.) your opponent's arms near your waist.
    c.) your opponent's arms around your throat.
    d.) your feet being further apart than expected.

    4. Learn to appreciate the value of pinning your opponent's hands to you. In the case of this technique it prevents the possibility of a choke from occurring. Precautionary moves such as pinning, or any other form of a check, are greatly encouraged.

    5. The more you practice dropping into a horse stance, such as the first move of this technique, the more it will help to appreciate the value of stabilizing your base and the benefits of marriage of gravity.

    6. On the second move of your technique be sure to direct your force toward your opponent and not away from him.

    7. One of the benefits of CONTOURING your right elbow strike on the last move of your technique is that it insures accuracy.


    6. GRASP OF DEATH

    1. NAME: The name of this technique originates from the severe nature of the attack. The "grasp" of your opponent could prove fatal if your reaction is not properly executed.

    2. THEME: This technique is to acquaint you with a flank attack and one that is also a life threatening attack. It further introduces simple body and foot maneuvers. When such positions are obtained they will thwart or decrease the effectiveness of your opponent's attack. We encourage you to also learn from this technique the priorities of self-preservation.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique introduces you to an attack from your left flank (9:00). The technique describes your opponent grabbing your head and pulling you down into a side headlock. Contemplate these additional possibilities:

    a.) You are already bent over when he attacks.
    b.) You are positioned on your hands and knees and your opponent is pulling you up.
    c.) There is a wall nearby.
    d.) Your opponent pins your right arm with his right arm as he applies the headlock.

    4. Alter the targets when rendering your "Horse Bite". Use a pinch to other targets.

    5. Be certain to stabilize your base on the first move. It is highly recommended that you make a list of the benefits that stem from it.

    6. Study the reaction of your opponent's right leg after employing the "horse bite". Work the "horse bite" on people who are not familiar with the technique.

    7. Do this technique to the opposite side by having your partner apply the headlock from the right flank.

    7. CHECKING THE STORM

    1. NAME: "Storm" is a symbolic term used to describe club attacks. The name of this technique stems from your initial as well as continuous efforts to prevent your opponent from employing his club.

    2. THEME: This technique involves a life threatening overhead club attack. Realizing that your opponent has a long range weapon, your response is to move out of the Line of Attack with your feet and to also deviate the course of your opponent's weapon with your hand. Although you must get out of the Line of Attack, it is extremely important that you remain within range to effectively counter your opponent's attack. Proper positioning will also help to increase target exposure on your opponent.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique teaches that the attack is from the front. The attack commences with your opponent in a left fighting stance. Your opponent then steps forward and executes a right overhead club attack toward your head. Some additional "WHAT IF" factors are:

    a.) Your opponent does not step through very far.
    b.) Your opponent does not step through at all.
    c.) Your opponent snaps his club back.

    4. Decide which is more important: blocking or getting out of the line of attack.

    5. In the IDEAL attack your opponent finishes with his right leg forward. If his left leg were forward, it would not effect your first move, but may require you to FORMULATE your second move.

    6. Examine the hazards of moving too far from your opponent on your first move.

    7. Examine the pros and cons of moving to other clock positions.

    8. Although confronted by a long range weapon do not overlook the use of your opponent's natural weapons.

    8. MACE OF AGGRESSION

    1. NAME: The name of this technique stems from your response to your opponent's attack. Your mace, the symbolic term for fist, is aggressively triggered by your opponent's pull.

    2. THEME: The theme of this technique is to convert what once was a defensive motion (when retreating) into an offensive motion (when advancing) due to the depth factors.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique starts with your opponent attacking you from the front. He begins his attack by grabbing your lapel with both his hands and then pulls you toward him. Study these additional "WHAT IF" factors:

    a.) As your opponent pulls you, he keeps his arms stiff vs. bent.
    b.) Visualize your opponent's pull to be down on a diagonal.
    c.) Your opponent is a great deal taller than you.
    d.) Your opponent is a great deal shorter than you.

    4. Concentrate on your raking back knuckle traveling through the bridge of your opponent's nose to 10:30 so that the depth of your action is increased.

    5. Your initial pinning check is a "vice-like" pin. Therefore, pin your opponent's hands to your chest. Remember, the pinning action is not downward, but toward you. Please take the time to investigate how a vice works.

    6. By stepping forward with your opponent's pull you not only borrow your opponent's force, but learn to STABILIZE YOUR BASE.

    7. Please take notice of the similarities between Mace of Aggression and Deflecting Hammer.


    9. ATTACKING MACE

    1. NAME: As described above "mace" is symbolic for fist. In this case the technique's name stems from the action of your opponent's attacking fist.

    2. THEME: This technique favors grabbing checks to control your opponent. It uses reverse motion twice. In viewing this reverse combination sequence the following can be observed: a) left block then right punch, b) right block then left punch.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique begins from the front. Your opponent commences from a left fighting stance. As he steps forward, he executes a right straight punch toward your face. Study these additional "WHAT IF" factors:

    a. Your opponent does not step through.
    b. His punch is directed toward your midsection.
    c. Your opponent attacks you with full body momentum.
    d. Your back is to the wall.
    e. Your opponent precedes his punch with a right step through kick.
    f. Your opponent is thrusting a club.

    4. During your right punch to his ribs your left inward block remains checking at your opponent's right elbow. This will prevent intentional as well as unintentional moves on his part.

    5. As you complete the grab of his right arm, be sure to position your left fist at your left ribcage (point of origin). This ANGLE OF DELIVERY will promote the accuracy of your next strike.


    10. SWORD AND HAMMER

    1. NAME: The name of this technique originates from two sources, (1) the natural weapons employed, and (2) the order of their employment. The technique requires that you first strike with a "sword" (knife‑ edge of your hand) and then follow-up with a "hammer" (your fist).

    2. THEME: "WITH" is the theme of this technique. You are pinning with your left hand as you simultaneously strike with your right outward handsword. One move does not follow the other. To repeat, they are both executed simultaneously. The technique also teaches you to move into the semi-unknown with confidence. Internalize this technique and you will prevent your opponent from activating other weapons.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique begins with your opponent attacking you from your right flank (3:00). When grabbing your right shoulder your opponent's left arm is bent at the elbow. Study these additional "WHAT IF" factors to increase your mastery of this technique:

    a. Your opponent is pulling you toward him.
    b. Your opponent is pushing you away from him.
    c. Your opponent is slightly located to the rear of you.
    d. Your opponent is much taller than you are.

    4. Be sure to look at your opponent when stepping in with your right handsword strike to his throat. Your awareness of all activities is encouraged.

    5. Practice should include having your partner, who is acting as your opponent, vary the directions of his attack (between 4:30 and 1:30). This in turn will alter your lines of attack and increase your knowledge of how to cope with each changing situation. Don't forget, practice with your partner attacking you from any one of the directions stemming from 4:30 to 1:30. Your awareness of variables is encouraged.

    6. It is a sound concept to pin your opponent's grabbing hand to you to prevent a planned or unplanned counter. Please make a list of some of his possible planned and unplanned moves.

    7. "For every action there is an opposite and equal reaction."
    As your hand sword drives your opponent's head back, his groin may jut forward. Quickly strike your opponent's groin with your hammerfist to borrow this force as well as include marriage of gravity obtained when bending your knees at the precise moment of your hammerfist strike.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

    "It's much easier to quote, than to know." - Ron Chapél


    www.MSUACF.com

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    Default Re: October 2019 TOM Striking Set 1

    Hi Doc

    When and how were the sets introduced?

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