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    Default EPAKS Yellow Belt Manual - Complete

    EPAKS Yellow Belt Manual

    (This material is NOT to be used for resale and is intended for personal and historical use only)
    This file is what Ed Parker approved to publish at the time of his passing.

    Disclaimer:

    I appreciate everyone's response to the information being released
    (specifically the belt manual). Although the information contained is
    invaluable to the study of American Kenpo, please understand that this, like
    most all writings, it is subject to typographical errors.

    This material was in the final editing stages at the time of my fathers passing.
    It is possible to find typos in reference to such things as directions of
    movement, weapons used or selected targets. This material should be used as
    a resource, not your primary means of study in the Art. Seek out
    knowledgeable instruction to ensure proper understanding of the material.
    This is material is for personal reference and historical purposes only, and not intended for resale.

    Thank you,

    Edmund K. Parker Jr.


    KENPO CREED

    I COME TO YOU WITH ONLY KARATE, EMPTY HANDS. I
    HAVE NO WEAPONS, BUT SHOULD I BE FORCED TO DEFEND MYSELF,
    MY PRINCIPLES, OR MY HONOR; SHOULD IT BE A MATTER OF LIFE
    OR DEATH, OF RIGHT OR WRONG; THEN HERE ARE MY WEAPONS,
    KARATE, MY EMPTY HANDS..

    ED PARKER


    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    TITLE PAGE

    Kenpo Creed 1
    Table of Contents 2
    Introduction 3
    Prerequisites 4
    Formalities 5-7
    Ed Parker History 8,9
    Sayings 10
    Synonyms 11
    Clock Principle 12
    Standardized Markings for Lower Belt Rankings 13
    Terminology 14-17
    Basics 18
    Techniques
    a. Required Techniques 19
    b. Explained 20-25
    c. Notes 26-35
    Forms (Short Form #1)
    a. Explained 36
    b. What it Contains and Teaches 37
    c. Foot & Hand Movements 38
    d. Notes 39
    Sets (Blocking Set #1 - Star Block) 40
    Freestyle
    a. List 41
    b. Explained 42
    c. Notes 43
    Written Test 44-48
    Student Notes 49


    INTRODUCTION

    Most people are totally oblivious of danger. Others disregard danger, convinced that danger will never be a part of their life. However, whatever your attitude might be, be realistic and ACCEPT the fact that impending dangers do exist, and consider them seriously. Once you ACCEPT the existence of these impending dangers, and realize that logical measures of prevention can help to avoid them, you have inherently armed yourself with a prime weapon against attack.

    You must then create the DESIRE to do something about it, have the CONVICTION to begin your study of preventive measures, and instill the WILL POWER to see your desire to completion.

    Whatever the attitude so is the response. When in or out of class treat your fellow students with respect. Belittle no one, encourage all, and become an inspiring example. Develop positive attitudes at all times. Avoid being adverse to changing your attitude. Be willing to learn, to think, to accept challenges, to explore, and to share the knowledge learned. As you grasp the elements of the Art, be creative! Do not just solve problems, but discover what they are! Subsequently, do not criticize others unless you have established solutions. Problems without answers serve no purpose. Cultivate flexible thoughts. They help to expand your Vocabulary of Motion. Developing flexible thoughts inevitably leads to increasing your ability to alter and tailor.

    Diligently study the terminology for it contains a wealth of answers provided by Mr. Parker. Do not procrastinate. Make every effort to learn the terminology now. It will accelerate your understanding of Kenpo, and increase your enjoyment of the art. Commence with basics. Do not be enticed to advance your study of the art prematurely. Commence with fundamentals of importance. First master your stances. They are the foundation of your fighting art. If you follow this advice, you will find greater enjoyment in Kenpo, and look forward to continued study. This same art will additionally yield self-confidence, self-awareness, alertness, self-discipline, etc...all of which may be called upon if needed to defend yourself.

    PREREQUISITES FOR YELLOW BELT

    1. Recite the Kenpo Creed.
    2. Follow the Formalities of the Association and your studio.
    3. Recite the Sayings for Yellow Belt.
    4. Read the History of Mr. Parker.
    5. Know the Synonyms used in the names of the techniques.
    6. Be able to explain the Clock Principle.
    7. Be able to explain the Belt Ranking System.
    8. Be able to explain and give examples of the Terminology.
    9. Execute your Basics in a relaxed manner, accurately, and with comprehension of proper execution.
    10. Perform Short Form #1 on both sides.
    11. Be able to explain some of the things that Short Form #1 contains and teaches.
    12. Know your Yellow Belt Freestyle Techniques.
    13. Familiarize yourself with the concepts contained in the Yellow Belt Freestyle Techniques.
    14. Know your Techniques; that is, know the attack, the proper sequential response, and the proper name associated with it.
    15. Practice your techniques with confidence against all types of people: short, tall, heavy, light, meek, aggressive, experienced, skilled, awkward, etc...
    16. Develop ways to practice your techniques semi-spontaneously.
    17. Be able to answer the questions on the Written Test.

    FORMALITIES

    Whenever tradition can compliment the present, as well as influence the future, we should not hesitate to adopt it. Formalities and ceremonies associated with the Martial Arts have and still serve an important role. Because of their positive qualities they are stressed and emphasized at all of our Association schools. Through adherence to formalities and ceremonies, discipline and respect become ingrained in the students. It must be emphasized, however, that adherence to formalities and ceremonies does not compel anyone to comply with any sect or religion.

    1. UNIFORMS: Students' uniforms shall be white and should be maintained in a clean and sanitary condition. All brand name tags should be removed from uniforms.

    2. PATCHES: The IKKA CREST should be placed 1/2 inch below the seam and centered on the left shoulder.


    The ASSOCIATION PATCH should be placed on the left front side of the GI. To find the proper height, the patch should be positioned so that the dividing lines of the circle in the patch are centered over the left breast at the nipple or slightly above it. In aligning your patch for sewing, it is recommended that you first put on your top, cross your left lapel over your right lapel, and then position your patch.


    3. BELTS: All brand name tags shall be removed from belts. Be sure you have been instructed on how to properly tie your belt.
    Only instructors are allowed to tie and position their belt with the knot to the front and in the middle. However when an instructor is taught by someone of higher rank, he relinquishes this privilege and places the knot to the left to show respect to his instructor. Disregarding this formality denotes disrespect to an instructor and to the Art. The one and only time a student can position the knot in the middle is when he (or she) competes at a tournament. All male students tie their belt with the knot positioned to the left . This not only shows respect, but it shows that he is a novice who has not yet earned the privilege of sharing the honor given to the instructors and those of higher knowledge. All female students tie their belt with the knot positioned to the right (see illustrations). Again, this not only shows respect, but that she is a female novice not yet privileged to share the honor held by instructors (male or female), and those of higher knowledge. Male students wear their knot to the left (the weak side) and female students wear their knot to the right (the strong side) because females are the stronger of the two sexes in terms of the amount of internal pain that they can endure (especially during childbirth).


    4. VERBAL RESPECT: Black Belts and instructors should be addressed as "Mr." (Miss or Mrs. if the instructor is female) and then by their last name. This generates respect to those of higher rank. It helps to acknowledge their skill, experience, and time devoted to the Art. Since we address older men of the community as "Mr." as a means of showing our respect for their ability, wisdom, age, and experience, so should we show respect to those with more experience in the Art.


    5. LATE STUDENTS: If a student is late for class, he must stand at the edge of the training room, be recognized by the instructor, and acknowledged by the instructor. The student will then return the instructor's acknowledgement with a salute, before being allowed to join the class.


    6. CREED & PLEDGES: The CREED has become an accepted Code for many Martial Artists. It denotes the Martial Artist's way of life in today's environment. Equally as important, the Creed acts as a guide to the Martial Artist in developing a keen sense of justice.
    The use of the words "right or wrong" leaves no margin for clemency but to defend one's self. A matter of "life or death" means strict adherence to survival in protecting loved ones or self even if it means death to the adversary should no alternative be left. "Principles" must be upheld and protected, for without them the very core and soul of man is valueless. "Honor" motivates a Martial Artist to action because it gives him dignity. "Empty Hands" (as well as other body weapons) are the substitutes that a Martial Artist uses in place of man-made weapons to sustain his honor. Discipline developed through training without weapons implants justice and discretion when applying the Martial Arts.
    The PLEDGES are extensions of the CREED, composed and designed to further promulgate spiritual character among the lower ranks.

    7. BOW OF RESPECT: Whenever a student enters or leaves the training area, he is required to bow. Bowing to the training area demonstrates respect for the Art as well as the area where others have trained before him. Bowing is done to inanimate objects only. A salute (hand gesture) is always done to show respect to an instructor or individual.
    The bow should stem from an attention stance. When you are bowing, bow your head for a period of two seconds before returning to an attention stance.

    8. SALUTE OF RESPECT: Upon entering the school, salutations utilizing prescribed hand gestures are made to all Black Belts and instructors along with the proper verbal greeting. The salute is always directed to the senior belt holder first and then in the order of their rank (highest to lowest). Black Belts from other systems are acknowledged after those of our own system.
    Even when a class is being conducted (private or otherwise) an instructor is required to call his students to attention, have his students face the senior instructor when he arrives, and salute him.
    The same procedure, utilizing the prescribed salute, occurs after meditating and when a student is about to leave the practice area or school.
    Even while away from the school, students are encouraged to continue to show this respect. Like a handshake it is a sign of respect and friendship. Through such practice, students learn to humble themselves, to be courteous to others, to develop patience, as well as appreciate their instructor's efforts.

    9.SALUTATION: THE HISTORY & THE MEANINGS:
    The history and meaning of these movements will be described in the upcoming belt levels.


    10. MEDITATION: Before a class actually commences, students are required to meditate in a horse stance, with their backs erect, head bowed, eyes closed, and their left open hand covering their right clenched fist. This position is also assumed at the end of the training session. The purpose of this practice is to have the students clear their minds of all outside activities prior to starting their class. In the event they may have had a confrontation on the street causing negative thoughts, they should clear their minds of such thoughts to prevent them or fellow students from receiving possible injury. With a calm and serene mind, they will be able to absorb new material more readily, become more conscious of their every effort, and crisp in their actions. In short, it prepares the mind and body to receive or reflect on the knowledge obtained.
    When meditating at the conclusion of class, students are to ponder over the knowledge received and make a personal commitment not to ever misuse the new (or old) knowledge. They are to constantly reflect upon the preciousness of life and the Creed which they are to follow.

    11. PERSONAL CONDUCT: At all times you are to act with respect toward yourself, others, and your school. Absolutely no smoking, drinking, or abusive language is allowed on any occasion involving you and/or other members of your school, and certainly not while in uniform. Be respectful to your training center; help keep it clean at all times for the benefit of all. In addition, be prompt and courteous with the payments for your lessons.

    12. KENPO KARATE: A simple translation of Kenpo Karate would be "Law of the Fist and the Empty Hand". Chinese instructors of Kenpo were imported by the Okinawans to teach them the art of Kenpo. The Okinawans then developed the "Karate method of Kenpo". When Mr. Parker first began learning with Mr. Chow, Mr. Chow was calling the art, Kenpo Karate. This choice of words was due to the public familiarity with the word Karate. Today we refer to our art as Ed Parker's American Kenpo.

    ED PARKER

    Mr. Ed Parker is the foremost authority and instructor of Kenpo Karate in the United States today and is known world-wide as "Mr. Karate". He is the "Founder of American Kenpo", the president and founder of the Ed Parker Kenpo Karate Studio chain, as well as the International Kenpo Karate Association. He is the Father of American Karate having originated the first American version of Karate. He commenced teaching professionally in Provo, Utah in 1954. He opened his first professional Karate studio in the United States in Pasadena, California in 1956.

    He has been featured in National and International magazines: Time, Look, Strength and Health, Show Business Illustrated, Iron Man, Action Karate, Black Belt, Karate Illustrated, Official Karate, Inside Kung Fu, American Karate, and Karate/Kung Fu Illustrated; in newspapers nation-wide; Martial Arts' magazines world wide; articles in the World Encyclopedia and many others.

    He has appeared in dozens of movies and television shows, including Revenge of the Pink Panther and The Curse of the Pink Panther. In addition, he has taught Karate to nearly every big name actor and actress in Hollywood -- including, Robert Culp, Joey Bishop, Jose Ferrar, Rick Jason, Nick Adams, Frank Lovejoy, Robert Wagner, Elvis Presley, Natalie Wood and Elke Sommer, to name a few. He has also been a technical advisor for motion pictures and T.V.

    Mr. Parker has spoken, lectured or put on his exciting demonstrations at: high schools, colleges, civic clubs, clinics, tournaments, church groups, youth groups, etc. He is a highly sought-after speaker and his Karate demonstrations are famous nation and world-wide. He is in great demand throughout the world to put on his blinding demonstrations of speed, skill and power along with his picturesque analogies when explaining the Art so all can understand. He frequently puts on Seminars and Demonstrations in Australia, England, Spain, Ireland, Chile, Venezuela and has many worldwide government officials as his students.

    Throughout the years Mr. Parker has authored many books: Basic Karate Book, Kenpo Karate, The Women's Guide to Self Defense, Secrets of Chinese Karate, A Guide to Law Enforcement, Home Study Karate Workshop Course, A Guide To The Nunchaku, Infinite Insights into Kenpo (Volumes 1-5), The Zen Of Kenpo, Kenpo In The Streets, Speak With A Knife, Speak With A Club, Everyday Gestures That Can Save Your Life, Answers To Multiple Attacks On The Street, Inside Elvis, Accumulative Journals (Yellow - 5th Black), and his revolutionary Encyclopedia of Kenpo. Instructional video tapes are also products of his endeavors to enlighten others of the merits of Kenpo.

    He is a graduate of Kamehameha High School (1949), Honolulu, Hawaii where he was born and raised. Mr.Parker has a B.S. Degree from Brigham Young University (1956) with a Major in Sociology and Psychology, and a Minor in Political Science.

    Mr. Parker annually produces the world's largest and foremost Karate tournament, the International Karate Championships in Long Beach, California. Mr. Parker is also a consultant and advisor to numerous other Karate tournaments world-wide.

    Mr. Parker's uniqueness rests in his continuous efforts to combat traditional restrictions binding progressive thinking. He is truly a creative genius because of his incredible ability to discover the problems within the Martial Arts. His contributions and innovations are endless, encompassing logic and reasoning not yet employed by others. His four decades of experience, contributions, and endeavors establish him as the Master of our system, the author of our training material, and the final voice of approval.


    SAYINGS FOR YELLOW BELT
    • Distance is your best friend.
    • Whatever the attitude, so is the response.
    • When blocking on the inside of an opponent's arm, do so below the elbow, never above it.
    • When blocking on the outside of an opponent's arm, do so at or above the elbow, never below it.
    • The ankle is the wrist of the foot.
    • A knife-edge kick is a chop with the foot.
    • Deflection; then infliction of pain.
    Please learn your sayings. They are invaluable tools. Some make comparative analysis for you; others provide practical insights into the way real survival encounters are. All sayings provide logical and useful insights into Kenpo. The application of many may be extended into other facets of your daily life.


    SYNONYMS
    • Hammer...Side of Clenched Fist (Hammer Portion of Hand)
    • Mace...Fist
    • Storm...Club Attack
    • Sword...Side of Open Hand (Chop or Handsword)
    • Twig...Arm
    The synonyms used in the self-defense techniques were developed for several reasons. Their usage makes the names of the self-defense techniques more colorful, descriptive, and interesting. Secondly, the name often indicates the attacking weapon, or your response to the attack.

    CLOCK PRINCIPLE


    Throughout your lessons constant reference will be made to the face of a clock. This reference actually relates to angles used when teaching, to show you the proper positioning of your feet in the performance of your basics, self-defense techniques, freestyle techniques, forms, etc. For example, when starting a form (set), you should picture yourself standing in the middle of a large clock that has been placed on the floor. The direction you face when starting should always be 12 o'clock, to the right of you 3 o'clock, directly behind you 6 o'clock, and to your left 9 o'clock. Like an Air Force pilot you should imagine the hour hand of the clock half way between the major clock positions to determine 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, and 10:30. As you move from your starting position, having knowledge of where other points on the clock are will help you perform your moves with a more definite sense of direction. This principle also applies when learning self-defense techniques; 12 o'clock will always be the direction you face when first starting regardless of where the attack stems -- front, flank, rear, or otherwise. Still another example: when learning, you may be facing 12 o'clock with your opponent attacking from 3 o'clock and being asked to have your left foot step back to 9 o'clock as you face your opponent attacking from 3 o'clock. Three facets would have been involved here, the original direction in which you were facing (12 o'clock), the angle from which your opponent attacked you (3 o'clock), and the correct position of your foot (9 o'clock) which would have been necessary to thwart the attack.
    In short, the "Clock Principle" is a directional reference used to aid you in selecting the proper direction when attacked, retaliating, or working your basics.



    STANDARDIZED MARKINGS FOR RANK DESIGNATION
    (LOWER BELTS)



    At ED PARKER'S KARATE STUDIOS every beginning student commences his program by wearing a WHITE belt. The first belt rank of any distinction is the YELLOW belt. The entire belt is yellow with no other attached designation. The second promotion, ADVANCED YELLOW, entitles the student to wear an orange strip on his YELLOW belt. Each color belt thereafter up to GREEN is divided into two stages -- REGULAR (plain), and ADVANCED (designated by a strip of the next corresponding color advancement); ORANGE -- ORANGE with a purple strip; PURPLE -- PURPLE with a blue strip; BLUE -- BLUE with a green strip; GREEN -- GREEN with a brown strip.
    Each corresponding color strip shall be precisely 1/2 inch wide. There shall be one (1) inch from the end of the belt to the start of the colored strip. The strips should be made of "IRON ON TAPE". The brand name (tags) of the gi company shall be removed from both ends of the belt.
    All advancements requiring strips must be put on by the student immediately after their promotion.

    YELLOW BELT TERMINOLOGY


    ANGLE(S) OF ATTACK - The eight major directions from which you or an opponent can attack or defend.

    BASICS - Simplified moves that comprise the fundamentals of Kenpo. They are divided into stances, maneuvers, blocks, strikes, specialized moves and methods, etc.

    BLOCK(S) - A defensive maneuver used to hinder or check an attack; all defensive moves employing physical contact to check, cushion, deflect, redirect, or stop an offensive move.

    CHOP - A cutting blow to an opponent or object, which generally employs the knife-edge of the hand as the weapon.

    CLASSICAL - A term used to describe the so-called pure systems of Karate or Kung Fu. Many of the movements associated with these systems are not practical in our present environment, since their methods were created for the types of defense found prevalent during their particular time of history.

    CLAWING - Striking action employing the fingertips to scratch or rip with. Such action may employ two or more fingers.

    CLOCK PRINCIPLE - A method used to help students visualize the direction in which they are to move. Students are generally asked to think of themselves as being in the middle of a big clock facing 12 o'clock, with 6 o'clock to their rear, 3 and 9 to their right and left, and all other numbers in their respective locations.

    COMBAT - Realistic fight which excludes control and rules.

    CORKSCREW PUNCH - A torquing, twisting punch that strikes with the palm down.

    DRAG - The sliding of one foot toward the other while either moving forward, backward, or to the side.

    DRAG STEP - The sliding of one foot forward, backward, or to the side before having the opposite foot step away from it. It is one of the four categorical methods of SHUFFLING.

    EMBRYONIC BASICS - Simple basic movements that are generally single in action and purpose. Although primitive in nature they form the basic roots of Kenpo.

    FORM - Is literally a short story of motion. It consists of basic movements of offense and defense incorporated into a dance-like routine for purposes of exercising, training without a partner, or training at home. It is an index of movements that gives specific answers, as well as speculative interpretations to combat situations.

    FREESTYLE -A term used in Karate for sparring. As in boxing, it is a combination of offensive and defensive moves used extemporaneously. To state it differently, it is a combative method of freely expressing yourself physically.

    GUARD - Defensive positioning of the arms and legs in preparation for an attack. See FIGHTING POSITION.

    HEEL/KNEE LINE - Method of determining the proper depth of a neutral bow and arrow stance. Here, if you have proper depth to your stance, the heel of the forward foot should just touch the knee of the rear leg if you pivot forward on your toes and kneel.

    KICK(S) - Generally refers to method(s) used when striking with the foot. It also includes striking with the shin, calf, peroneus longus, knee, or other parts of the leg.

    LOCK OUT - It is a type of check that is used to briefly detain the action of your opponent. It involves striking a target with a natural weapon, and having the weapon remain on the target for a time before retrieving it.

    MECHANICAL - Refers to those whose movements are very staccato in execution and appearance. Sequence of movements which look as if it is being done by-the-numbers. Movements are robot-like in appearance.

    MOVE - (1) A command used when teaching to cause a student to react during a particular exercise. (2) The traveling of any object from one point to another.

    NATURAL WEAPONS - The use of body parts as offensive weapons. This includes using parts of the hand, arm, foot, leg, head, etc.

    OVER-REACH - To over-extend oneself with a blow or kick needlessly, or to reach beyond or above a certain point unnecessarily. Target exposure is the result of such action.

    PARRY - Redirecting a blow or kick by riding or going with the force.

    PIVOT - Is the changing from one stance or position to another while in place. This is done without moving the foot from the spot it is.

    POKE - Refers to the thrusting of the tips or joints of the fingers to particular target areas on an opponent's body. The primary targets are the eyes.

    PRACTICAL MOVES - Realistic moves that are functional in combat. Moves that not only work during practice, but on the streets as well.

    PUNCH - Primarily refers to the methods used when striking with the front portion of the fist.

    PUSH-DRAG - A type of SHUFFLE requiring your forward or rear leg to raise slightly before having the supporting leg push forward or back. The pushing leg must then drag toward the opposite leg so that the distance between them returns to its original depth. Once the original depth is re-established you are ready to resume the next PUSH-DRAG SHUFFLE. This is just one of four methods of SHUFFLING.

    SET - An appendage to a FORM. See definition of a Form. This term is also used by Western Chinese to describe a FORM.

    SHUFFLE - A foot maneuver used to close or increase the distance between you and your opponent. In Kenpo there are four methods that accomplish this; push-drag, drag-step, step-drag, and pull-drag. All four methods are categorized as foot maneuvers.

    SNAP(PING) - A method of execution requiring the natural weapon to strike out and back with a greater magnitude than the action of a WHIP. See WHIP.

    SOPHISTICATED BASICS - A single basic move that produces multiple results.

    STEP-DRAG - The stepping forward, or back, with one foot and the dragging of the other foot so that the distance between them returns to their original depth. This is another of the methods of shuffling.

    STEP THROUGH - The execution of full steps, by either moving forward or back. In the case of a step through kick, it means kicking with the forward foot and planting it to your rear, or kicking with the rear foot and planting it to your front.

    STRIKE(S) - Methods used to execute NATURAL WEAPONS. VITAL TARGETS can be punched, kicked, chopped, poked, hammered, etc.

    SWITCH - In place exchange of lead legs while facing the same direction. This is done by exchanging foot positions from one spot to another. Three alternatives can be used in making the exchange, (1) you can step back to front (2) step front to back, or (3) jump in place.

    TARGETS - VITAL AREAS on your or your opponent's body which can be injured or damaged when struck.

    THRUST - A particular method of execution used to propel a strike. It resembles an explosive push type action.

    TOE/HEEL LINE - Method of determining the proper width of a NEUTRAL BOW AND ARROW STANCE, where the toe of the forward foot is in line with the heel of the rear foot.

    TORQUE - Twisting and rotating action used to position your body and muscles to work at maximum efficiency. See ROTATING FORCE.

    VITAL AREAS - The major weak points of the body.

    WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION - The apportionment of weight related to a particular stance. It may vary, fifty-fifty, sixty-forty, ninety-ten, etc.



    PREREQUISITE BASICS FOR YELLOW BELT


    STANCES
    Attention
    Natural
    Horse
    Neutral Bow
    Forward Bow
    Cat (45 degree)

    FINGER TECHNIQUES
    Inward Overhead Claw

    KICKS
    Front Snap-Ball
    Side Snap-Knife Edge
    Back Snap-Heel

    BLOCKS
    Front Roundhouse
    Step Through Kicks
    Inward
    Vertical Outward
    Upward
    Downward Extended Outward

    FOOT MANEUVERS
    Step Through Blocks Drag-Step
    Step-Drag
    Step Through

    PUNCHES
    Snapping Horizontal Snapping Vertical
    Thrusting Horizontal
    Thrusting Vertical
    Uppercut

    FORMS & SETS
    Star Block
    Short Form #1


    STRIKES
    Inward Handsword
    Outward Handsword
    Inward Horizontal Elbow
    Outward Elbow
    Inward Overhead Elbow
    Back Hammerfist


    REQUIRED TECHNIQUES FOR YELLOW BELT
    (In the order they are to be taught.)


    1. DELAYED SWORD (front - right hand lapel grab)

    2. ALTERNATING MACES (front - two-hand push)

    3. SWORD OF DESTRUCTION (front - left straight or roundhouse punch)

    4. DEFLECTING HAMMER (front - right front thrust kick)

    5. CAPTURED TWIGS (rear - bear-hug, arms pinned)

    6. GRASP OF DEATH (left flank - right arm headlock)

    7. CHECKING THE STORM (front - right step-through overhead club)

    8. MACE OF AGGRESSION (front - two-hand lapel grab, pulling in)

    9. ATTACKING MACE (front - right step through straight punch)

    10. SWORD AND HAMMER (right flank - left hand shoulder grab)


    (CATEGORICAL BREAKDOWN)


    GRABS & TACKLES
    1. DELAYED SWORD
    2. MACE OF AGGRESSION
    3. SWORD AND HAMMER

    HUGS & HOLDS
    1. CAPTURED TWIGS

    PUSHES
    1. ALTERNATING MACES

    LOCKS & CHOKES
    1. GRASP OF DEATH

    PUNCHES

    1. SWORD OF DESTRUCTION
    2. ATTACKING MACE

    WEAPONS
    1. CHECKING THE STORM

    KICKS
    1. DEFLECTING HAMMER


    __________________________________________________ _____________________________
    TECHNIQUES FOR YELLOW BELT

    1. DELAYED SWORD (front - right hand lapel grab)
    1. Standing naturally, step back with your left foot toward 6:00 into a right neutral bow stance facing 12:00, while simultaneously executing a right inward block to the right inner wrist of your opponent's right hand lapel grab. At the same time position your left hand at solar-plexus level as a precautionary check against further action. (Your block should clear your opponent's right arm, and expose the width of his body.)
    2. Immediately slide your right foot back into a cat stance.
    3. Without hesitation deliver a right front snap ball kick to your opponent's groin. (Your opponent's reaction should cause him to bend forward at the waist.)
    4. Plant your right foot forward into a right neutral bow (facing 12:00), to check your opponent's right knee, as you deliver a right outward handsword strike to the right side of your opponent's neck. Remember to maintain the position of your left hand as a precautionary check. Immediately slide your right hand (after the strike) to the right wrist of your opponent as an additional precautionary check. (Your opponent's response should cause him to fall to the ground.)
    2. ALTERNATING MACES (front - two-hand push)
    1. Standing naturally, and as your opponent attempts to push you, step back with your left foot toward 6:00 into a right neutral bow stance (facing 12:00). Simultaneously execute a right inward block to the outside of your opponent's left arm, while your left hand checks at your solar plexus. (This action should turn the width of your opponent's body, and redirect his forward momentum off center.)
    2. Immediately collapse your right arm across the top of both of your opponent's arms (to act as checks), as you deliver a left vertical thrust punch (tracking over your right arm) to your opponent's sternum or solar-plexus. This is done while pivoting into a right forward bow stance. Remember, both the stance change and punch must work in synchronization with each other in order to maximize the force of your left vertical thrust punch. (Your opponent's reaction should cause his body to bend forward at the waist.)
    3. Immediately convert your left punch into a check by having it shift, palm open and down, on top of both your opponent's arms. Simultaneously have your right hand rapidly travel inside and over your left arm as you deliver a right outward back knuckle strike to your opponent's right temple. This transition is done while pivoting back into a right neutral bow stance. (The torque stemming from your stance change helps to increase the whipping action of your right hand, and, if properly executed, should cause your opponent`s head to be driven up and back, with the possibility of his arms flailing upward.)
    4. Immediately have your right hand snap back as a positional check.

    3. SWORD OF DESTRUCTION
    (front - left straight or roundhouse punch)
    1. Standing naturally, step back with your left foot toward 6:00 into a right neutral bow stance (facing 12:00), as you simultaneously execute a right extended outward block to the inner forearm of your opponent's left punch. Your left hand should be in a positional check, covering your solar-plexus.
    2. Immediately slide your right foot back into a 45 degree cat stance.
    3. Without hesitation deliver a right front snap ball kick to your opponent's groin. (Your kick should cause your opponent to bend forward at the waist.)
    4. While planting your right foot forward, inside of your opponent's left leg, and into a right neutral bow (facing 12:00), employ Marriage of Gravity as you execute a right inward handsword strike to the left side of your opponent's neck. (This action should cause your opponent to fall to the ground.)
    5. Immediately snap your right hand back to the left shoulder
    6. of your opponent to act as a check.
    4. DEFLECTING HAMMER (front - right front thrust kick)
    1. Standing naturally, step back with your left foot toward 7:30 into a right neutral bow stance (to move out of your opponent's Line of Attack), as you simultaneously execute a right outside downward diagonal block against the outside of your opponent's right kicking leg. Be sure to have your left hand check at your solar plexus during your block. (Your opponent's body should turn slightly to his left when your block is properly executed. Your block should, additionally, turn your opponent`s width, and cause injury to his leg.)
    2. Without hesitation, and while still in your right neutral bow, shuffle forward "with" a left sliding check down and onto your opponent's right elbow. (Make sure your left hand checks your opponent`s forward momentum as well as the width of his upper body.) At the same time, your right hand and arm continue to circle, and will re-orbit (just as you conclude your forward shuffle) into an inward horizontal elbow strike to your opponent's face. ( Your action should cause your opponent's head to snap back, and possibly drop him to the ground.)
    3. Just as you conclude your forward shuffle, execute a left sliding check down and onto your opponent's right elbow simultaneously "with" a right inward horizontal elbow strike to your opponent's face. The body momentum obtained from your shuffle, coupled with the forward momentum of your opponent's reaction, not only adds to the effects of borrowed force, but thoroughly checks your opponent's depth zone as well. (The effects of both action should cause your opponent's head to snap back and possibly have your opponent drop to the ground.)
    5. CAPTURED TWIGS (rear - bear hug with arms pinned)
    1. Standing naturally, with your opponent's arms around your arms, step to 9 o'clock with your left foot into a horse stance (while looking over your right shoulder), and simultaneously pin your opponent's hands to your body with your left hand. Just as your weight settles into your horse stance, execute a right back hammerfist strike to your opponent's groin. (This action should cause your opponent to bend forward at the waist, and possibly release his grasp.)
    2. Immediately slide your right foot into a right cat stance (turning 90 degrees while facing 3 o'clock) as your left hand releases the pin, clears your opponent's right arm, and covers in front of your face as a positional check. Simultaneously with the action of your left arm have your right hand cover your groin, and proceed to clear your opponent's left arm.
    3. Execute a right heel stomp kick to your opponent's left instep, causing your opponent to bend forward even further.
    4. Slide your right foot back toward 3:00 into a horse stance. Immediately have your right forearm CONTOUR (track) up the middle of your opponent's body as you execute a right vertical obscure elbow strike to the underside of your opponent's chin. Have your right arm snap back after the strike, and cover your groin. (Your opponent's head should have been popped up and back, and his body may also spin away from you if done properly.)
    6. GRASP OF DEATH (left flank - right arm headlock)
    1. With your head forced to bend forward, and your opponent to your left flank (applying a headlock with his right arm), initiate your action by simultaneously, (1) tucking your chin to the left and against your chest, (2) grabbing your opponent's right wrist with your right hand, (3) stepping forward toward 12 o'clock into a right close kneel stance and (4) grabbing your opponent's right inner thigh with your left hand, and pinching the flesh of that leg with as much strength as possible. Your opponent will experience a horse-bite effect if it is done correctly. Be sure to continue checking the outside of your opponent's right leg with your left knee during the course of your action. (Your opponent's right knee may bend and double up, or his leg may pop forward and up off the ground. In addition, your efforts should cause your opponent to loosen his grip.)
    2. As your opponent reacts to your pinch, and partially or totally releases his grip, have your right hand bring his right arm over your head and down to your chest, making sure that your right elbow is anchored to aid you in controlling your opponent's height and width.
    3. Immediately release the grip of your left hand, and simultaneously (1) have your left foot step forward (in front of your opponent's right leg) toward 10:30 into a left neutral bow stance, (2) strike the back of your opponent's right elbow with your left forearm while (3) pulling in and toward you with your right hand. (This action should cause your opponent to step forward with his left foot prior to bending over at the waist.)
    4. ROLL your left forearm on the back of your opponent's right elbow until your left forearm is parallel to the ground. Now slide your left hand to your opponent's right elbow. While controlling your opponent's right elbow with your left hand, pivot into a left forward bow facing 10:30. Immediately execute a right snapping vertical punch to the base of your opponent's skull behind his right mastoid bone. (This action should cause your opponent's head to move away, and possibly result in his body falling to the ground.)
    7. CHECKING THE STORM (Front - right step-through overhead club)
    1. Standing naturally, as your opponent swings his club in an overhead fashion, quickly step off to your right with your right foot toward 3 o'clock. Simultaneously drag your left foot toward your right foot as you form a left 45 degree cat stance facing 10:30. Without a break in the flow of your action, execute a right inward parry followed by a left extended outward handsword block (striking block) to the inner wrist of your opponent's right arm. During the natural flow of your motion have your right hand proceed to act as a check in front of your solar-plexus.
    2. Immediately execute a left front snap ball kick to your opponent's groin. (This should cause your opponent to bend forward at the waist.)
    3. Be sure to properly gauge the distance between you and your opponent as you plant your left foot toward 10:00, and deliver a right step-through snapping knife-edge kick to the inside of your opponent's right knee. (Your action should cause your opponent's right knee to bend out and away from you, but cause his head to move closer to you.)
    4. Plant your right foot toward 10:00 into a right neutral bow, and, while employing MARRIAGE OF GRAVITY, execute a right outward back knuckle strike to your opponent's left temple. Have your left hand remain checking at your solar plexus. (This action should drive your opponent's head away from you and possibly cause his body to drop to the ground.)
    8. MACE OF AGGRESSION (front -- two-hand lapel grab -- pulling in)
    1. Standing naturally, your opponent grabs your lapel with both of his hands and pulls you toward him. When this occurs simultaneously execute (1) a right stomp on top of the arch of your opponent's right foot, (2) a right inward diagonal downward raking back knuckle strike (toward 10:30) to the bridge of your opponent's nose (stressing depth of penetration), as (3) your left hand pins and checks both of your opponent's hands to your chest. (Your opponent's knees should buckle from the stomp as your back knuckle strike breaks his nose and momentarily drives his head back.)
    2. Continue the motion of your right arm so that it travels horizontally and down, striking both of your opponent's forearms, which will force your opponent to bend forward. (It is important that you keep your right elbow on the outside of your opponent's left arm to prevent it from being trapped.)
    3. Immediately execute a right inward horizontal elbow strike (contouring but not restricting your movement) to the left side of your opponent's jaw, (as your left hand remains checking) making sure that you follow through with your action. (This will turn your opponent's head to his right.)
    4. Without hesitation, return with a right outward horizontal elbow strike to the right side of your opponent's jaw. (This should force your opponent away from you.)


    9. ATTACKING MACE
    (front - right step through straight punch)
    1. With your feet together, drop back with your right foot toward 6:00 into a left neutral bow stance (facing 12:00), as you execute a left inward block to the outside of your opponent's right punch. During this action, your right hand cocks forward and slightly to the right of your solar plexus (fist clenched and palm up). (This action will turn and momentarily check the width of your opponent's body.)
    2. Immediately pivot into a left forward bow stance as you execute a right straight horizontal thrust punch to the right lower ribcage of your opponent. Make sure that your left hand is open as it checks your opponent's right elbow. (Your action should cause your opponent to bend forward at the waist, and to be forced back slightly.)
    3. Circle your right hand clockwise so that it travels down, out, over, and around your opponent's right arm as you countergrab the outside of his right wrist. Immediately pull your opponent's arm diagonally and down past your right hip, while simultaneously delivering a right roundhouse kick to his groin. During this action, cock your left hand slightly above your left ribcage (fist clenched and palm up). (Your kick and pull should cause your opponent to bend forward even further, thus exposing his right kidney.)
    4. Drop forward into a right forward bow toward 12:00, while simultaneously executing a left snapping vertical punch to your opponent's right kidney, "with" your right leg ON AND OVER THE LINE OF ENTRY. (Make sure your right knee is inside of, but over your opponent's right knee and pressing up against it. Your punch combined with your buckle will drop your opponent to the ground, as well as move him away from you.)
    10. SWORD AND HAMMER (right flank - left hand shoulder grab)
    1. While you are standing naturally (facing 12 o'clock), your opponent (standing between 3 and 4 o'clock) grabs your right shoulder with his left hand. Immediately and simultaneously (1) step off and to your right with your right foot toward 3 o'clock into a horse stance (with your head and eyes turned toward your opponent), (2) strike your opponent's throat with a right outward handsword, and (3) pin your opponent's left hand to your right shoulder with your left hand. (This action should cause your opponent's head to move away from you.)
    2. As your opponent reacts to your handsword strike and bends backward, settle your body (by bending your knees) and with the help of gravitational marriage execute a right back hammerfist strike to your opponent's groin. (Your opponent should then bend forward at the waist.)
    NOTE: The Yellow Belt Techniques do not stress single or double cover outs. These cover out maneuvers were purposely excluded to keep the material simple at this particular belt level. However, those with the rank of Orange and above are required to add the appropriate cover outs when performing the Yellow Belt Techniques.

    __________________________________________________ _____________________________
    NOTES ON THE YELLOW BELT TECHNIQUES

    1. DELAYED SWORD


    1. NAME: This technique derives its name from its basic sequence of movements. The chop (handsword) is delayed by the insertion of a kick prior to its use. Thus the name DELAYED SWORD.

    2. THEME: This technique was designed to teach you how to create distance while blocking your opponent's extended arm with your forward arm. You then can follow up with a longer range weapon (in this case a kick using the forward or lead leg) to a target that is farther removed from you. It also teaches you how to gauge distance with your kicking leg, which in turn enables you to properly gauge the distance of your extended hand weapon.

    3. THE ATTACK: In the IDEAL PHASE of the technique the attack is from the front. As your opponent grabs your lapel with his right hand, some of the WHAT IF factors that can occur are:

    a. His attacking arm may be bent when pulling you forward.
    b. His attacking arm may be straight and locked out.
    c. His attacking arm may be initially bent and then pushes you out.
    d. His right foot may be forward when grabbing.
    e. His left foot may be forward when grabbing.
    f. He may be leaning forward when grabbing.

    In addition, visualize the attack to be:

    g. a right push instead of a grab.
    h. a right punch instead of a grab.
    i. a two-hand grab.
    j. a two-hand push instead of a grab.
    k. a right kick followed by a right punch.
    l. others...........

    4. In your early stages of learning it is a good idea to utilize your more coordinated hand to the front when defending yourself.

    5. The transitory cat stance of your second move assures proper alignment, which in turn promotes accuracy. It also enhances the speed of your action in addition to allowing you to FORMULATE according to the prevailing circumstances.

    6. Learn to fully take advantage of body momentum via MARRIAGE OF GRAVITY (height) as well as forward momentum (depth) when executing your last move (right outward handsword).

    7. During the execution of your last handsword, angle your strike so that you diagonally cut down, through, and across your opponent's body to check his height, width, and depth zones.

    8. It is highly suggested that you also experiment with various methods of execution (thrusting vs snapping your right handsword on the last move).

    9. Familiarize yourself with the basic coordination levels of movement. Learn to increase the efficiency of your movements by adhering to the following:

    a. When moving back, utilize the opposite hand of the foot that steps back (opposite hand/opposite foot).
    b. When moving forward, utilize the same hand as the foot that moves forward (like hand/like foot).

    10. During the course of your last move, be sure that your left hand supports your second line of defense with a positional check.

    2. ALTERNATING MACES

    1. NAME: This technique was so named because of the rythmatic changes of action. Your hands alternate: front, then rear, and then front.

    2. THEME: This technique also familiarizes you with the importance of creating distance. As the name of the technique implies, you are to learn to alternate your hands: front, then rear, and then front. Likewise you are to learn how to alternate your selected targets. The technique introduces you to the study of how to use specific weapons to specific targets in a specific sequence of movements to calculate the reactions of your opponent.

    3. THE ATTACK: In the IDEAL attack your opponent pushes from the front. He attempts this by stepping through with a two-hand push to the chest. Some additional "what if" factors that can be contemplated are:

    a. The attack may be a low two-hand push.
    b. The attack may be a left push.
    c. It may be a left straight punch.
    d. It is possible that it can be a left cross wrist grab.
    e. It may commence as an attempted two-hand grab.

    4. Practice varying the timing and rhythm of your basic sequence.

    5. Vary the path of your final back knuckle strike by having it travel under your left arm, or over it. Study the benefits of each.

    6. Take special notice of how the height of your opponent's attacking hands influences your response.

    7. Explore the most effective way to pivot into a forward bow.
    8. Also learn to defend yourself against this attack without the use of a block.

    9. Build spontaneity by having your partner vary his attacks: right grab, right push, right punch, left push, left straight punch, two- hand push. Respond to these variables with a right inward block simultaneous with a left positional check. This method of practice will help you to internalize the concept that the same defense may be used on the inside of your opponent's right arm, as well as the outside of his left arm.
    When practicing with the same defense on the inside or outside of your opponent's arms, follow-up with sequences from either Delayed Sword or Alternating Maces as the situation dictates. The practice of blending these two techniques in the manner described will help you to internalize effective responses to diverse situations.

    10. Always seek knowledge that will help you cultivate useful variables. Consequently, to assist you in this undertaking, further expand your knowledge by having your partner vary the height of the following attacks: left pushes, left grabs, left straight punches, and two-hand pushes. Respond to these variables with a right inward block on the outside of your opponent's left arm simultaneous with a left positional check. This will teach you that the same defense may be used even though the height of the attack may vary.
    Follow-up your block with sequential movements from either Alternating Maces or the left side of Attacking Mace. Remember to consider all practical alternatives. Therefore, do not only select exposed target areas of significance, but consider your opponent's reactions. Failing to make the latter choice can produce adverse results. Hence, practice with foresight. Foresight is a major key in helping you make the right choice. Please observe that the above technique teaches you how to attack various height zones on your opponent.


    3. SWORD OF DESTRUCTION

    1. NAME: This technique gains its name, in part, from the powerful action of your last strike. The shape of the hand (natural weapon) resembles that of a sword.

    2. THEME: This technique teaches you to apply the theme of Delayed Sword on the inside of either arm.

    3. THE ATTACK:
    In the IDEAL PHASE of this technique, the attack is again from the front. Your opponent starts from a right fighting stance, and proceeds to step forward with his left leg while delivering a left roundhouse punch to your head. Study and learn to counter additional possibilities by visualizing:

    a. the punch as being a hooking punch.
    b. a straight punch.
    c. a punch that travels on a different path.
    d. a punch that seeks a different target.
    e. the attack to be an attempted bear hug from the front.
    f. a high left roundhouse kick.
    g. a low left roundhouse kick.

    4. This technique is almost the mirror image of Delayed Sword. Please take special note of the footwork.

    5. Be aware of the possibility that your opponent's groin may not be open. Formulate other significant alternatives to this situation.

    6. Observe how the attitude of your attacking partner effects your response. Remedy each response accordingly. Learn to do this and you are well on your way to uncovering the merits of TAILORING.

    7. Build spontaneity by having your partner vary his attacks:

    a. Right hand (grab, push, or punch) and then left hand (straight or roundhouse
    punch). Respond to these variables with a right inward block followed by a right
    extended outward block. With each block utilize a left positional check.
    b. Left hand (straight or roundhouse punch) and then right hand (attempted grab,
    push, or punch). Respond to these variables with a right extended outward block
    followed by a right inward block. With each block utilize a left positional check.

    This method of practice will help you internalize the concept that the same hand may easily be used to defend on the inside of alternating punches, etc..

    When practicing defense with the same hand on the inside of your opponent's arms, follow up with sequences from either Delayed Sword or Sword of Destruction. The practice of blending these two techniques in the manner described will help you to internalize rapid responses to rapidly changing situations.


    4. DEFLECTING HAMMER

    1. NAME:
    The name of this technique originates from the hammering action of your initial block and the reaction that results from it.

    2. THEME: This technique teaches you how to create distance while employing an angle change. This is accomplished by your stepping away from, and out of the line of, your opponent's attack. Since your opponent is employing a long range weapon, emphasis is placed on the use of foot maneuvers. Foot maneuvers are stressed because of the multiple benefits that they offer; (1) an angle change that causes your body to be out of the line of attack, (2) simultaneous use of your foot maneuver and your blocking arm to insure the deflection of your opponent's attack, and (3) coordination of your foot maneuvers with your hand weapons.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique again teaches you that the attack is from the front. The attack is a right step through thrusting ball kick to your groin or midsection. Your opponent's intent is to kick through you while forcefully exerting all of his weight into his kick. As with the previous techniques, the study of other possible methods of employment should also be considered. View additional attacks as:


    a. a low kick to your knees.
    b. a right thrusting knife edge kick.
    c. a right thrusting back heel kick.
    d. a right spinning back heel kick.
    e. a right low kick followed by a right punch to the head.
    f. a high kick aimed to your head.
    g. having your opponent's kick include foot maneuvers, shuffles, crossovers etc.

    4. Reduce the force of your opponent's kick by increasing the distance between the two of you.

    5. Getting out of the Line of Attack increases your ability to protect yourself against a low kick.

    6. While action is normally faster than reaction jamming your opponent's right biceps, during the second move of your sequence, can prevent your opponent from taking further action.

    7. Striking high generally entails checking low. To the contrary striking low generally requires checking high.

    8.
    Should your opponent immediately add a right punch to his right kick, it might be expedient for you to formulate a left inward block to the outside of your opponent's right arm. Your follow-up would then be a right inward elbow strike to his right lower ribs.

    9. Learn to flow with your technique. While you are encouraged to maintain crispness throughout your technique sequence practice consolidating all moves to look as if they were one.

    10.
    Use your opponent's Marriage of Gravity at the precise moment you employ your elbow strike. This illustrates the value of borrowed force.



    5. CAPTURED TWIGS


    1. NAME:
    "Twigs" is a symbolic term for arms. In this technique your arms are momentarily entrapped, thus the name Captured Twigs.

    2. THEME:
    This technique teaches you how flank movements can provide you with exceptional access to rear targets. It also teaches you how to adapt to an overwhelming attack in addition to recognizing the availability of targets and weapons.

    3. THE ATTACK:
    The IDEAL PHASE of this technique introduces you to an attack from the rear. The technique describes your opponent applying a bear-hug, from the rear, with both of your arms pinned near your biceps. As with the other techniques it is imperative that you study additional possibilities such as:

    a. your opponent's arms being at your shoulder level.
    b. your opponent's arms near your waist.
    c. your opponent's arms around your throat.
    d. your feet being further apart than expected.

    4. Learn to appreciate the value of pinning your opponent's hands to you. In the case of this technique it prevents the possibility of a choke from occurring. Precautionary moves such as pinning, or any other form of a check, are greatly encouraged.

    5. The more you practice dropping into a horse stance, such as the first move of this technique, the more it will help to appreciate the value of stabilizing your base and the benefits of marriage of gravity.

    6.
    On the second move of your technique be sure to direct your force toward your opponent and not away from him.

    7. One of the benefits of CONTOURING your right elbow strike on the last move of your technique is that it insures accuracy.


    6. GRASP OF DEATH

    1. NAME:
    The name of this technique originates from the severe nature of the attack. The "grasp" of your opponent could prove fatal if your reaction is not properly executed.

    2. THEME: This technique is to acquaint you with a flank attack and one that is also a life threatening attack. It further introduces simple body and foot maneuvers. When such positions are obtained they will thwart or decrease the effectiveness of your opponent's attack. We encourage you to also learn from this technique the priorities of self-preservation.

    3. THE ATTACK: The IDEAL PHASE of this technique introduces you to an attack from your left flank (9:00). The technique describes your opponent grabbing your head and pulling you down into a side headlock. Contemplate these additional possibilities:

    a. You are already bent over when he attacks.
    b. You are positioned on your hands and knees and your opponent is pulling you up.
    c. There is a wall nearby.
    d. Your opponent pins your right arm with his right arm as he applies the headlock.
    4. Alter the targets when rendering your "Horse Bite". Use a pinch to other targets.

    5. Be certain to stabilize your base on the first move. It is highly recommended that you make a list of the benefits that stem from it.

    6. Study the reaction of your opponent's right leg after employing the "horse bite". Work the "horse bite" on people who are not familiar with the technique.

    7. Do this technique to the opposite side by having your partner apply the headlock from the right flank.

    8. MACE OF AGGRESSION

    1. NAME: The name of this technique stems from your response to your opponent's attack. Your mace, the symbolic term for fist, is aggressively triggered by your opponent's pull.

    2. THEME: The theme of this technique is to convert what once was a defensive motion (when retreating) into an offensive motion (when advancing) due to the depth factors.

    3. THE ATTACK:
    The IDEAL PHASE of this technique starts with your opponent attacking you from the front. He begins his attack by grabbing your lapel with both his hands and then pulls you toward him. Study these additional "WHAT IF" factors:

    a. As your opponent pulls you, he keeps his arms stiff vs. bent.
    b. Visualize your opponent's pull to be down on a diagonal.
    c. Your opponent is a great deal taller than you.
    d. Your opponent is a great deal shorter than you.

    4.
    Concentrate on your raking back knuckle traveling through the bridge of your opponent's nose to 10:30 so that the depth of your action is increased.

    5.
    Your initial pinning check is a "vice-like" pin. Therefore, pin your opponent's hands to your chest. Remember, the pinning action is not downward, but toward you. Please take the time to investigate how a vice works.

    6. By stepping forward with your opponent's pull you not only borrow your opponent's force, but learn to STABILIZE YOUR BASE.

    7. Please take notice of the similarities between Mace of Aggression and Deflecting Hammer.


    9. ATTACKING MACE


    1. NAME:
    As described above "mace" is symbolic for fist. In this case the technique's name stems from the action of your opponent's attacking fist.

    2. THEME: This technique favors grabbing checks to control your opponent. It uses reverse motion twice. In viewing this reverse combination sequence the following can be observed: a) left block then right punch, b) right block then left punch.

    3. THE ATTACK:
    The IDEAL PHASE of this technique begins from the front. Your opponent commences from a left fighting stance. As he steps forward, he executes a right straight punch toward your face. Study these additional "WHAT IF" factors:

    a. Your opponent does not step through.
    b. His punch is directed toward your midsection.
    c. Your opponent attacks you with full body momentum.
    d. Your back is to the wall.
    e. Your opponent precedes his punch with a right step through kick.
    f. Your opponent is thrusting a club.

    4. During your right punch to his ribs your left inward block remains checking at your opponent's right elbow. This will prevent intentional as well as unintentional moves on his part.

    5. As you complete the grab of his right arm, be sure to position your left fist at your left ribcage (point of origin). This ANGLE OF DELIVERY will promote the accuracy of your next strike.


    10. SWORD AND HAMMER

    1. NAME:
    The name of this technique originates from two sources, (1) the natural weapons employed, and (2) the order of their employment. The technique requires that you first strike with a "sword" (knife- edge of your hand) and then follow-up with a "hammer" (your fist).

    2. THEME: "WITH" is the theme of this technique. You are pinning with your left hand as you simultaneously strike with your right outward handsword. One move does not follow the other. To repeat, they are both executed simultaneously. The technique also teaches you to move into the semi-unknown with confidence. Internalize this technique and you will prevent your opponent from activating other weapons.

    3. THE ATTACK:
    The IDEAL PHASE of this technique begins with your opponent attacking you from your right flank (3:00). When grabbing your right shoulder your opponent's left arm is bent at the elbow. Study these additional "WHAT IF" factors to increase your mastery of this technique:

    a. Your opponent is pulling you toward him.
    b. Your opponent is pushing you away from him.
    c. Your opponent is slightly located to the rear of you.
    d. Your opponent is much taller than you are.

    4.
    Be sure to look at your opponent when stepping in with your right handsword strike to his throat. Your awareness of all activities is encouraged.

    5. Practice should include having your partner, who is acting as your opponent, vary the directions of his attack (between 4:30 and 1:30). This in turn will alter your lines of attack and increase your knowledge of how to cope with each changing situation. Don't forget, practice with your partner attacking you from any one of the directions stemming from 4:30 to 1:30. Your awareness of variables is encouraged.

    6. It is a sound concept to pin your opponent's grabbing hand to you to prevent a planned or unplanned counter. Please make a list of some of his possible planned and unplanned moves.

    7. "For every action there is an opposite and equal reaction."
    As your handsword drives your opponent's head back, his groin may jut forward. Quickly strike your opponent's groin with your hammerfist to borrow this force as well as include marriage of gravity obtained when bending your knees at the precise moment of your hammerfist strike.

    SHORT FORM 1

    OPENING: ATTENTION STANCE. BOW. DROP TO A MEDITATING HORSE STANCE. COME UP TO AN ATTENTION STANCE. SIGNIFY. EXECUTE THE SALUTATION: 1) SALUTE, 2) SYMBOL OF FRIENDLY AND UNARMED,3) MEDITATING HORSE, 4) PRAYER OF FORGIVENESS. THEN RETURN TO A MEDITATING HORSE, AND CONCLUDE WITH THE HEAD UP AND EYES OPEN.

    1. Your left foot drops back toward 6:00 into a right neutral bow to 12:00, while executing a right inward block, simultaneous "with" a left back elbow strike.
    2. Your right foot drops back toward 6:00 into a left neutral bow to 12:00, while executing a left inward block simultaneous "with" a right back elbow strike.
    3. Cover (by moving your right foot toward 3:00) into a left neutral bow to 9:00, while executing a left vertical outward block simultaneous "with" a right back elbow strike.
    4. Your left foot drops back toward 3:00 into a right neutral bow to 9:00, while executing a right vertical outward block simultaneous "with" a left back elbow strike.
    5. Cover (by moving your right foot slightly to your left while essentially at 9:00) into a left neutral bow to 3:00, while executing a left upward block simultaneous "with" a right back elbow strike.
    6. Your left foot drops back toward 9:00 into a right neutral bow to 3:00, while executing a right upward block simultaneous"with" a left back elbow strike.
    7. Cover (by moving your left foot toward 12:00) into a right neutral bow to 6:00, while executing a right downward block simultaneous "with" a left back elbow strike.
    8. Your right foot drops back toward 12:00 into a left neutral bow to 6:00, while executing a left downward block simultaneous "with" a right back elbow strike.

    CLOSING: Cover (by having your left foot drag to your right foot and out to 9:00) into a MEDITATING HORSE STANCE, facing 12:00. COME TO ATTENTION. EXECUTE THE FULL SALUTATION. BOW.

    SHORT FORM 1

    Contains/Teaches

    Contains:

    1. Moves that are strictly defensive.
    2. Stances:

    a. Attention
    b. Horse
    c. Neutral

    3. Basic blocks:

    a. Inward
    b. Outward
    c. Upward
    d. Downward

    4. Double blocks ( Double Factor ) :

    a. High
    b. Low

    5. Four basic angles of attack.
    6. Back elbow strike while blocking.
    7. Nineteen moves including both sides and close.

    Teaches:

    1. Stay down while in a stance.
    2. Erect posture.
    3. Increased peripheral vision.
    4. Always look at your opponent.
    5. Never expose your back unnecessarily.
    6. How to cover into a neutral bow.
    7. Constant head level while changing stances.
    8. How to retreat from an opponent when turning to face the unknown.
    9. Basic timing of hands and feet.
    10. How to block while retreating. (Opposite hand, Opposite foot)
    11. Relax and tense at the proper moment.
    12. Angle changes in preparation for a mass attack.
    13. How to use the opposite arm as a hidden weapon.
    14. How to move up and down in an "L" shape pattern.
    15. Repetition of the four basic blocks while retreating.
    16. To have your block make contact at a distance from you so that your opponent's punch will be greatly diverted.
    17. Crisp moves with snap and torque.

    CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER OF MOVEMENTS IN SHORT FORM 1



    Two (2) inward blocks, two (2) outward blocks, two (2) upward blocks, and two (2) downward blocks while utilizing the "clock principle" to simplify foot movements.


    RIGHT SIDE ONLY

    FOOT MOVEMENTS..........|..........HAND MOVEMENTS

    1. lt - 6..........|..........rt - in
    2. rt - 6..........|..........lt - in
    3. rt - 3..........|..........lt - out
    4. lt - 3..........|..........rt - out
    5. rt - 9 (slightly left/cover to 3)..........|..........lt - up
    6. lt - 9..........|..........rt - up
    7. lt - 12..........|..........rt - down
    8. rt - 12..........|..........lt - down
    9. lt - Horse (facing 12)..........|..........Salutation
    10. Close (in bring both feet together have your left foot
    close to the right and place both of your hands
    smartly to the sides of your thighs).


    NOTE: Employ the "CLOCK PRINCIPLE" when doing all forms, using 12 o'clock as your initial point of reference.

    NOTES ON SHORT FORM 1


    1. Practice both sides of the form.
    2. Try it in different environments: smooth floor, sand, in the dark, in the bathroom, wearing different clothes, etc...
    3. Practice with attackers; learn to first block on the outside of their weapons. Repeat the form while blocking on the inside of their weapons.
    4. List some of the benefits of covering.
    5. Note the advantage of maintaining a constant head level while moving.
    6. Your back elbow strikes should travel directly to your rear.
    7. Practice the form while being conscious of what it teaches.
    8. List some of the ways the form helps you to improve your freestyle.
    9. List some of the ways it improves your fighting.
    10. Note the two basic covers in Short Form 1: rear cover and side cover.
    11. Practice your blocks utilizing the DOUBLE FACTOR.
    12. Study the possible methods of executing your inward blocks on the first two moves of the form.
    13. Be sure to keep your fists clenched throughout this form.

    BLOCKING SET 1 (aka STAR BLOCK)
    (BOTH SIDES)


    A. Contains:

    Sequence of blocks that are as follows: (up, in, extended outward, down, re-cock, pushdown)

    1. Right upward block for a left overhead club attack or chop.
    2. Right inward block for a right punch to the body.
    3. Right extended outward block for a left punch to the face.
    4. Right outside downward block for a left kick to the groin.
    5. Right hand re-cocks (a right back elbow block) to your right hip for a left roundhouse kick to your right kidney.
    6. Right push-down block for a right knee kick to the groin.


    B. Teaches:

    1. Five (5) major blocks in addition to one (1) hidden block.
    2. Sequence of blocks that promote Continuity of Motion and preserve Economy of Motion.
    3. Correct manner in which to use your major blocks.
    4. Blocks that protect all three (3) "Zones of Protection".
    5. The execution of these major blocks while in a stationary position.
    6. Maximum cover of head and upper body areas.


    NOTE: REPEAT THE SAME SEQUENCE ON THE LEFT SIDE.


    YELLOW BELT FREESTYLE TECHNIQUES


    B -- This alphabet represents the BASE MOVE. It consists of two variations. Both variations commence from a " Left to Left" fighting position.

    LL -- LEFT TO LEFT:

    Your left leg (which is forward) is facing your opponent's left leg (which is forward). The first letter (in this case L) always refers to your lead leg (leg that's forward). The second letter (also L in this case) refers to your opponent's lead leg.

    (a) The first variation is a left hooking grab to your opponent's left arm, while pulling down, and diagonally to your left; this is simultaneously executed with a right vertical punch to your opponent's face.

    (b) The second variation is a left hooking grab to your opponent's left arm, then pulling it down, and diagonally to your left; this is simultaneously executed with a right uppercut punch to his left lower ribcage. This punch is diagonal and parallel with your opponent's left ribcage.

    Both variations require that your forward leg check your opponent's forward leg. This maneuver re-enforces an ANGLE OF DISTURBANCE and an ANGLE OF CANCELLATION.

    The numbers represent body and foot maneuvers, and are as follows:

    (1) In-place body maneuver (pivot to a forward bow)

    (2) Push-Drag

    (3) Front Crossover, Step Out

    (4) Front Crossover, Step Out, Step Through

    1. Bla... 5. B3a

    2. Blb ... 6. B3b

    3. B2a ... 7. B4a

    4. B2b ... 8. B4b


    EXPLANATION OF THE YELLOW BELT FREESTYLE TECHNIQUES


    B1a -- is the first variation, while pivoting into a left forward bow.

    B1b -- is the second variation, while pivoting into a left forward bow.

    B2a -- "2" indicates that the movement to be used is a push-drag, needed in the event that your opponent is a little out of range or when your opponent is in the process of moving back slightly, while executing the first variation of the base move.

    B2b -- indicates the push-drag is again used, but you are now to execute the second variation of the base move.

    B3a -- "3" indicates that a front crossover is executed while executing the grab, followed immediately by a step out while executing the first variation.

    B3b -- is the same application of the front crossover, step out, while executing the second variation.

    B4a -- "4" indicates that a front crossover is executed while executing the grab, followed by a step out, then a step through while executing the first variation. At this level your right step through should position you inside of your opponent's left leg. (This is referred to as being inside of the Angle of Entry).

    B4b -- is the same application of the front crossover, step out, step through while executing the second variation.


    NOTES ON THE YELLOW BELT FREESTYLE TECHNIQUES


    1. The LEFT TO LEFT fighting position has been given priority since most Americans are familiar with these positions when boxing or street fighting.

    2. To improve your VOCABULARY OF MOTION, your chances of survival on the street, and your chances of success at tournaments, we highly recommend that you learn these same Freestyle Techniques from the RIGHT TO RIGHT fighting position as soon as possible.

    3. When first learning these movements, try to get a feel for some of the favorable features that they offer:

    a. You cannot always choose the distance when action begins.

    b. Gain knowledge of your hand strikes first. Practice your hand strikes while learning to solidify your base (stances). A firm FOUNDATION is much more important during your initial stages of learning.

    c. Move quickly and unhesitatingly when closing the gap between you and your opponent.

    d. The most effective punch occurs when your strongest arm is chambered in the rear hand position.

    e. If you can cancel your opponent's leverage points, he cannot strike you effectively.

    4. The WHAT IF factors in B4a allow you a number of choices. You can plant your right foot on the inside of, on top of, outside of your opponent's left foot. No matter what you may decide to use, it is important that you create an ANGLE OF CANCELLATION while simultaneously pulling with your left arm and planting your right foot. The precise placement of your right foot, simultaneous with the pulling of your left arm nullifies your opponent's height zones.



    THE WRITTEN TEST FOR YELLOW BELT

    SECTION I


    In section one of this test you are to read a statement, and if that statement is correct, then circle "T" for true. If any part of that statement is incorrect, then circle "F" for false.


    T F 1. Mr. Parker was born and raised in Hawaii.


    T F 2. "Heel-Knee Line" aids in determining the proper width of a Neutral Bow and Arrow Stance.


    T F 3. Mr. Parker went to Brigham Young University until his junior year and then quit to do karate as a living.


    T F 4. In the early stages of your learning, it is a good idea to defend with your more coordinated hand to the front.


    T F 5. When blocking on the inside of your opponent's arm, do so below the elbow, never above it.


    T F 6. In the Yellow Belt Freestyle technique "B2a" the "2" indicates a push-drag shuffle, and the "a" represents a right uppercut punch.


    T F 7. There are 3 basic methods of shuffling.


    T F 8. Mr. Parker began studying Kenpo when he was 16.


    T F 9. "Captured Twigs" is against a bear hug from the rear with the arms free.


    END OF SECTION I

    THE WRITTEN TEST FOR YELLOW BELT

    SECTION II


    In this section, a sentence or question will be presented. You are to choose the most correct and the most complete answer from the four possible answers given. Write the corresponding letter in the space provided.


    _____ 1. Mr. Parker studied __________ before learning Kenpo.

    a. Tae Kwon Do and Kick Boxing
    b. just Tae Kwon Do
    c. Judo and Boxing
    d. nothing

    _____ 2. Which of the following is not one of the three types of switching.

    a. Moving your back leg to the front, then moving your front leg to the back.
    b. Stepping through.
    c. Moving your front leg to the back, then moving your back leg to the front.
    d. Jumping in-place.

    _____ 3. Mr Parker is known as the __________.

    a. "The Father of Kenpo"
    b. "The Father of Karate"
    c. "The Father of the Martial Arts"
    d. "The Father of American Karate"

    _____ 4. "Delayed Sword" is not typically used against a _________.

    a. grab
    b. punch
    c. hug
    d. push

    _____ 5. Which of the following is not a foot maneuver taught in the Yellow Belt Freestyle techniques ?

    a. rear crossover
    b. front crossover, step out
    c. push-drag
    d. front crossover, step out, step through


    END OF SECTION II

    THE WRITTEN TEST FOR YELLOW BELT

    SECTION III


    In the following section, an incomplete statement is given. You are to provide a word or words in order to correctly complete it. Write your answer on the line given below each statement.


    1. Mr. Parker opened the first professional karate studio in (year) .

    __________________________________________________ _________

    2. "Whatever the attitude, so is the (what)."

    __________________________________________________ __________

    3. "The ankle is the (what) of the foot."

    __________________________________________________ __________

    4. Mr. Parker's Kenpo instructor was (who) .

    __________________________________________________ __________

    5. In executing a punch you generally strike with (which) portion of the fist.

    __________________________________________________ __________

    6. The sequence of blocks in "Star Block" is: upward, inward, extended outward, (what), back elbow, and push-down.

    __________________________________________________ __________

    7. IKKA is an abbreviation for (what).

    __________________________________________________ __________

    8. Two basic ways a person may be hit are: intentionally and (what) .

    __________________________________________________ __________

    9. "Angles of Attack" are the (number) basic directions from which you or your opponent can attack or defend.

    __________________________________________________ __________



    10. Mr. Parker is a (number) degree black belt.

    __________________________________________________ __________

    11. When paying respect, we bow to (what), and we salute to (whom).

    __________________________________________________ __________

    12. Male students wear their belt knots on the (side) , female on the (side) , and (who) in the middle.

    __________________________________________________ __________

    13. The weight distribution of a neutral bow and arrow stance is (percentages - in proper order) , a cat stance is (percentages - in proper order) , and a forward bow is (percentages - in proper order).

    __________________________________________________ __________


    END OF SECTION III

    THE WRITTEN TEST FOR YELLOW BELT

    SECTION IV


    This last section is divided into two parts. In part A you are required to provide a series of words, a phrase, or a paragraph in order to answer the question or execute the command given. In part B two topics are presented and you are to analyze them in the following way. 1) give a definition of each. 2) explain their similarities, if there are any. 3) explain their differences, if there are any. 4) give examples, illustrations, analogies or any other helpful aid to assist in distinguishing between the two topics. Write your answers on the supplementary paper given. Concise but precise answers are preferred.


    PART A:

    1. Write out the Kenpo Creed.

    2. What is "Over-reach", and why is it good or bad?

    3. What is "Guard"?

    4. Why is the Neutral Bow and Arrow Stance our basic fighting stance?

    5. List five ideas that Short Form I teaches.

    6. Why do we use meditation at the begin and end of every class?

    7. What is a "Step Through"?


    PART B:

    1. "Embryonic Basics" vs. "Sophisticated Basics"

    2. "Forms" vs. "Freestyle"

    3. "Snap" vs. "Thrust"


    END OF SECTION IV




    Ed Parker Sr. Memories
    Archived with the permission of Ed Parker Jr.
    Ed Parker Sr. was the founder of the art known today as American Kenpo.
    In these files, Ed Parker Jr. shares his fathers unpublished notes and other memories with us.
    For ANY and ALL KenpoTalk issues, please use theContact Us link here or at page bottom right. Do NOT PM me for site support.

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bob Hubbard For This Useful Post:

    cc313us (06-14-2009),MooseKenpo (08-18-2007)

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    Default Re: EPAKS Yellow Belt Manual - Complete

    I believe that we all should be very thankful to Mr. Parker for letting the rest of us see the insights into what Mr. Parker had behind the scenes. This has been very informative and insightful.




    Thanks.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to jfarnsworth For This Useful Post:

    MooseKenpo (08-18-2007)

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