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    Default 27 of 28

    INTRODUCTION


    A major criteria for obtaining your First Degree Brown Belt is an
    in-depth evaluation of your attitudes. It is important that you ask
    yourself what your attitudes are toward training or when training?
    What are your views concerning fighting or when fighting? If ever
    involved in a life or death situation, to what extent would you
    implement your knowledge? Would you gauge your knowledge to match the
    situation? Or, would you allow your emotions to take over? What are
    your attitudes toward teaching others? What attitudes do you wish to
    instill in your students? Are you satisfied with your present
    knowledge of Kenpo or are you willing to strive for higher goals and
    refinements? There is a special section following this introduction on
    attitude that should help you understand its importance.

    You must again explore the idea that, "For every move, concept,
    theory, principle, and definition there is an opposite and a reverse."
    For First Degree Brown Belt you will be encouraged to apply this idea
    when blocking with your feet. While most systems stress blocking and
    striking with their hands, do not overlook the importance of learning
    how to block and strike with your feet. Since the majority of street
    encounters end on the ground with one or more opponents it only stands
    to reason that you should learn to block as well as strike with your
    legs and feet. This knowledge greatly adds to you confidence,
    especially when you find yourself on the ground, or when attacking an
    opponent you have placed on the ground. When confronted with such
    predicaments there is a high probability of your legs being used to
    block with. Therefore, you should familiarize yourself with a variety
    of dimensional perplexities. It is imperative that you spend hours
    learning to block as well as strike with your legs and feet when
    confronted with such encounters.

    Additional training requires that you explore the art of
    breathing in conjunction with your physical moves. Investigate the
    specific differences between the internal and external forms of
    breathing. Define the pros and cons of each method of breathing. Spend
    quality hours coordinating your breathing patterns with the execution
    of your basic movements. Immediately employ your new found strengths
    to Short Form #1 through Long Form #4.

    Long Form #4 has often been referred to as containing the "meat"
    of Ed Parker's Kenpo. Since "forms are expressions of basic skills",
    you must develop Long Form #4 to a point of expressing your physical,
    mental, and emotional levels combined with your breathing techniques.
    Synchronize these ingredients and you are well on the road to
    Harnessing Force, Intone Motion, etc. Needless to say your movements
    should be crisp, precise, powerful, as well as contain sequential
    flow. Furthermore, seek the many details that Long Form #4 teaches
    before expressing them in the form.

    Your Blue Belt Journal introduced you to the benefits of
    suffixing. You, therefore, should have become reasonably acquainted
    with its use in all of the techniques learned. Investigating and
    experimenting with all prospects of suffixing when practicing your
    techniques is essential. This trend should continue throughout all
    belt levels. First Degree Brown Belt, on the other hand, is your
    introduction to systemized extensions to the Ideal Phase of your
    Orange Belt Techniques. As with the Orange Belt Techniques, each
    extension has a theme; that is it teaches a concept, theory, or
    principle not contained elsewhere, or an interesting perspective of
    how to modify your existing knowledge. Caution! You certainly must
    develop your basic Orange Belt Techniques to a proficient level. It
    would be unwise to add to a weak base.

    During the study of your First Degree Brown Belt level please
    emphasize your freestyle training. You must continue to explore the
    blending of your self-defense concepts with those of your freestyle
    concepts. Additionally, you must employ greater timing as you refine
    your use of the Dimensional Stages of Action. You should make every
    effort to incorporate the use of body maneuvers when employing your
    defensive and offensive skills.





    Ed Parker Sr. Memories
    Archived with the permission of Ed Parker Jr.
    Ed Parker Sr. was the founder of the art known today as American Kenpo.
    In these files, Ed Parker Jr. shares his fathers unpublished notes and other memories with us.
    Berserker101 likes this.

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    This is great

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    I guess I practice potato-kenpo, because we don't care about Long IV.
    Also Mastering Tsing Tao.

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    I don't much like it either . In fact, the only Kenpo forms in Parker lineages I like are Short and Long One. If pushed , I'll do up through Long Three, but I won't like it. I prefer Japanese/ Okinawan forms, but will admit one of my favorites is a Korean form from old Chang Moo Kwan called Chung Chang or Chung Jang, though I learned it a little different than " standard".
    "To be, rather than to seem"

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    I think form 5 looks sorta cool.

    One of Kenpo's mother arts is Shorin-ryu, and the most important kata from that tradition is arguably Naihanchi. Mitose was practising it, but for all we know, didn't teach it to Chow. Ed Parker didn't learn it, anyway.

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Expressing proper mindset?


    "Strike first, Strike hard, No Mercy SIR!"
    "Mercy is for the weak, we do not train to be merciful here, if someone stands against you they are the enemy, an enemy deserves no mercy!"

    :P
    "Do you have any bactine? Some of this blood is mine."

    "Dear Die-ary, today I stuffed some dolls full of dead rats I put in the blender. I'm wondering if, maybe, there really is something wrong with me."

    -JTHM

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    I think form 5 looks sorta cool.

    One of Kenpo's mother arts is Shorin-ryu, and the most important kata from that tradition is arguably Naihanchi. Mitose was practising it, but for all we know, didn't teach it to Chow. Ed Parker didn't learn it, anyway.
    Mitose's Shorin Ryu was rudimentary at best .
    "To be, rather than to seem"

    "Fix your rear foot ... What the hell is wrong with you?"

    "...I already watched the videos, and quite frankly, they're bullsh*t."

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by MrBunny View Post
    Expressing proper mindset?


    "Strike first, Strike hard, No Mercy SIR!"
    "Mercy is for the weak, we do not train to be merciful here, if someone stands against you they are the enemy, an enemy deserves no mercy!"

    :P


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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkC View Post
    Mitose's Shorin Ryu was rudimentary at best .
    There is quite a lot of Shorin Ryu in EPKK and the other Hawaiian Kenpo styles. Nothing comes from nowhere.

    Personally, I think James Mitose is underestimated as a martial artist.

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    There is quite a lot of Shorin Ryu in EPKK and the other Hawaiian Kenpo styles. Nothing comes from nowhere.

    Personally, I think James Mitose is underestimated as a martial artist.
    You're right, but it was badly done and poorly transmitted. Early Hawaiian Kempo/Kenpo guys weren't known for excellent technique.

    i disagree with you about Mitose, and we can just leave it at that.
    "To be, rather than to seem"

    "Fix your rear foot ... What the hell is wrong with you?"

    "...I already watched the videos, and quite frankly, they're bullsh*t."

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkC View Post
    You're right, but it was badly done and poorly transmitted.
    There are some remarkable similarities in particular between Hawaiian Kenpo and the teachings of the famous Okinawan Kempo master Choki Motobu. It is likely that Mitose was a student (directly or indirectly) of the latter, just like he had claimed. Motobu's interpretation of Shorin-ryu is entirely based on the Naihanchi kata and exceptionally simple. Its essence can be learned very quickly. That might explain why Mitose's Shorin-ryu was "rudimentary".

    Early Hawaiian Kempo/Kenpo guys weren't known for excellent technique.
    To my knowledge, there was only a handful of them, which became the well respected founders of their own styles.

    i disagree with you about Mitose, and we can just leave it at that.
    As to James Mitose's skills, there are different opinions. His student William Chow was known as an outstanding martial artist. It is said that Chow had additionally, or mainly, studied some Chinese style, but nothing certain is known about that. Fact is, a number of Parker and Tracy techniques can be traced (no pun intended) to Mitose's book What is Self-Defense? (Kenpo Jiu-Jitsu). In that book, we also see some influence from Mutsu Mizuho's Karate and, obviously, Okasaki's Danzan-Ryu.

    Anyway, it is most unlikely that the foundations of Kenpo in Hawaii were nothing but hot air.

    Also, James Mitose's son and successor Thomas Barro Mitose has demonstrated some considerable skill.

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Mitose was not a student of Motobu. His book is plagiarized, and not very skillfully.
    While Thomas may well be a skillful practitioner that doesn't mean his father was. there are plenty of students Chow and Mr. Parker both made statements as to Mitose's skills, and were not complimentary.

    Here's something I wrote in another thread on KT.
    The last thing I'd want to do (or at least one of the last) would be to disrespect Prof. Chow,but the form he demonstrated was pretty rudimentary and not done very well. Not a problem in my book, because as noted, he was known for his asskicking prowess, not his kata presentation.
    The early kenpo/kempo in Hawaii (and much of it still remains so) was pretty basic, not well understood or executed shorin ryu karate. In the hands of some of the early semi-legendary men, this was fine, since they were mostly badasses anyway.
    My comments are my own opinion and not meant to belittle anybody.

    I still stand by it, and others agree with me.

    Ed Parker was pretty bad at the execution of technique from a karate standpoint, as you can see in the video taken from the I Love Lucy show long ago. This was discussed on KT and in blogs elsewhere. It's not a slam on Mr. Parker's development or ultimate accomplishments and skills, just an observation of the early days.
    "To be, rather than to seem"

    "Fix your rear foot ... What the hell is wrong with you?"

    "...I already watched the videos, and quite frankly, they're bullsh*t."

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkC View Post
    Mitose was not a student of Motobu. His book is plagiarized, and not very skillfully.
    While Thomas may well be a skillful practitioner that doesn't mean his father was. there are plenty of students Chow and Mr. Parker both made statements as to Mitose's skills, and were not complimentary.
    The thing is that Kenpo has been "political" right from the start, and bringing up Mitose always makes otherwise objective observers and rational thinkers go into wild emotionalism. But like it or not, he is the one who started the Kenpo thing on Hawaii, and reading "What is Self-Defense?", it's obvious that Chow and others learned quite a lot from him.

    As I acknowledged in my earlier post, Mitose may have been an indirect student of Mitose. All we know with certainty is that Motobu wanted to settle down on Hawaii but was only allowed to spend a month or so there. Nevertheless, during his short stay, it looks like he passed on some of his knowledge to at least one student, who may in turn have taught Mitose later. But what is more remarkable is that, after Motobu's departure, Mutsu (who had been training both with Motobu and Funakoshi, and who is another main influence on Mitose's book) started teaching Karate on Hawaii. Some think that Motobu sent him there. Mutsu, Higaonna and Okazaki, they were all teaching in the same place! Motobu's ideas could reach Mitose quite easily - and to me, it is evident that they did.

    I may have some comments on Chow and Parker later.

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    There are some remarkable similarities in particular between Hawaiian Kenpo and the teachings of the famous Okinawan Kempo master Choki Motobu. It is likely that Mitose was a student (directly or indirectly) of the latter, just like he had claimed.
    I am curious. When did Mitose make this claim?
    Dave

    "I consider that the spiritual life is the life of man's real self, the life of that interior self whose flame is so often allowed to be smothered under the ashes of anxiety and futile concern." - Thomas Merton


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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by Kenpodave View Post
    I am curious. When did Mitose make this claim?
    According to Kajukenbo master and MA writer John Bishop, Mitose said to Adriano Emperado that Motobu was his uncle and teacher.

    Personally, I am not convinced that this is true literally. Knowledge of Motobu-ryu could have come down to Mitose via Mutsu, Higaonna and/or Miyashiro, all of whom had trained with Motobu and were teaching on Hawaii.

    It is interesting to consider the dichotomy between Motobu and Funakoshi in this context. It is no secret that they didn't get on with each other very well. Funakoshi was emphasizing Karate's artistic aspects, Motobu its martial side. Consequently, Okinawan Karate/Kempo was imported to the Japanese main isle as a sport by Funakoshi and the other masters who followed in his wake. Whereas due to Motobu's influence, in the Hawaiian Kenpo styles its martial essence was received. That is my theory.

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    None of Motobu's family or descendants acknowledge Mitose, did/do they?
    This is interesting to me a little because the system of Kempo I trained in up to Yondan contains a great deal of Motobu Ryu Shito Ryu from Shogo Kuniba. Doesn't look a lot like things that are supposed to come from Mitose.
    "To be, rather than to seem"

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    I think form 5 looks sorta cool.
    Erg. I studied in the Tracy lineage, and of the strictly Kenpo forms that I had learned, form five struck me as the most awkward and least useful as a training tool to develop real skill. I believe it was very poorly designed. The transitions and positioning are such that you cannot effectively engage the root in the delivery of technique. As performance art, it also strikes me as very odd. Personally, I have never view my training tools as performance art, tho others often do, especially when it comes to forms.
    Michael


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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by flying crane View Post
    Erg. I studied in the Tracy lineage, and of the strictly Kenpo forms that I had learned, form five struck me as the most awkward and least useful as a training tool to develop real skill. I believe it was very poorly designed. The transitions and positioning are such that you cannot effectively engage the root in the delivery of technique. As performance art, it also strikes me as very odd. Personally, I have never view my training tools as performance art, tho others often do, especially when it comes to forms.
    I don't know the L5 you studied, but my L5 is full of walking through people with some pretty cool elbow strikes. But one man's trash is another man's treasure, I suppose.
    Also Mastering Tsing Tao.

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by Star Dragon View Post
    ...Mitose may have been an indirect student of Mitose.
    This I think sums up the entire argument around the skill and background of James Mitose.

    Bill Parsons
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    "I know Kenpo!" "Cool... do you know how to use it?"

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    Default Re: 27 of 28

    Quote Originally Posted by bdparsons View Post
    This I think sums up the entire argument around the skill and background of James Mitose.

    Bill Parsons
    Triangle Kenpo Institute
    Nice one.
    "To be, rather than to seem"

    "Fix your rear foot ... What the hell is wrong with you?"

    "...I already watched the videos, and quite frankly, they're bullsh*t."

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