Results 1 to 1 of 1

Thread: "Kenpo in the Streets" Chapter 2 b (notes)

  1. #1
    Bob Hubbard's Avatar
    Bob Hubbard is offline Retired


    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Buffalo, New York, United States
    Posts
    5,610
    Thanks
    1,012
    Thanked 2,161 Times in 1,157 Posts

    Default "Kenpo in the Streets" Chapter 2 b (notes)

    "Kenpo in the Streets" Chapter 2 b (notes)
    written by Ed Parker Sr.




    1. ¯IDENTIFICATION OF THE TYPES OF DANGER

    It is important that you learn to ”envision" and identify all
    types of danger that you might encounter. ¯¯Try not to overlook one
    possibility.¯ Think like a street person. Cultivate a suspicious
    mind.

    2. ¯UNDERSTANDING THE ELEMENTS RELATED TO THE VARIOUS TYPES OF DANGER

    Thoroughly understand all facts related to the various types
    of danger. Analyze all situations in depth. Be suspicious of an
    invitation by one whom you consider an enemy. Question a person's
    smile. Is he really friendly or has he an ulterior motive? Proper
    reading of details, peculiarities, and traits will prepare you to
    act appropriately.

    Understand the elements and their effect on environment.
    Contemplate climatic changes and how they can alter your
    strategy. Plan alternate choices. Learn from the experiences of
    others. Study each new situation and broaden your knowledge of
    additional alternatives. Develop counters that can be easily
    tailored to each situation. Do everything in your power to make
    your environmental education more significant.

    3. ¯PERIODIC RE -EXAMINATION OF THE TYPES OF DANGERS AND THE ELEMENTS INVOLVED

    Conduct periodic re -examinations. Increase your
    understanding of facts already familiar to you. Continue to
    listen to the experiences of others. It is a continued source of
    expanding your awareness and understanding of incidents already
    known.

    Unknown threats to your personal safety can still occur.
    Consequently, expect new dangers to arise. Maintain flexibility
    of thought and action. Because there are no two situations alike
    your ability to ¯instinctively tailor is the key to survival.

    ¯RANGE

    ¯RANGE is the ¯third ¯preparatory consideration. This ¯consideration
    allows ¯distance to become your ally. If an attacker cannot reach you
    (assuming he has no weapon), he cannot hurt you. As a rule of thumb,
    always remain at least one and a half (of your opponent's) leg lengths
    away. This is important since an increased number of martial artists
    have become skilled kickers, in addition to being able to rapidly
    close the distance between the two of you. Creating this distance will
    keep you out of your opponent's ¯RANGE, but within ¯RANGE to initiate an
    attack.

    ¯RANGE ¯¯may already favor you when combat commences. If not,
    strategically create it to insure your safety. Make every effort to
    keep it working for you by moving back, under, above (by jumping, f
    vaulting, or using an overhead beam to pull yourself up) or to either
    side (right or left) of a strike. Whatever is necessary continue to
    make ¯distance your ally even when retaliating.

    Do not overlook the fact that environmental surroundings,
    (chairs, tables, posts, etc.,) are also excellent blockades to keep an
    opponent at bay. Although distances may not be as great, obstacles can
    be excellent substitutes to keep an opponent from reaching the
    critical areas of your body.

    ¯POSITION

    POSITION constitutes the ¯fourth ¯preparatory consideration. ¯This
    involves the ¯position of your body (when standing erect) in relation
    to your ¯opponent and his to yours ¯prior, ¯during, or ¯after combat.
    These ¯POSITIONS may result from specific ¯stances influenced by
    ¯environment and ¯range or after ¯having taken into account the
    ¯direction, as well as the ¯height, ¯width, and ¯depth zones of your body
    in relation to your opponent, and his to yours.

    The basic premise is that proper body ¯positioning aids you in
    minimizing the effects of your opponent's attacks by limiting his
    access to your vital areas. ¯¯Should your initial ¯POSITION automatically
    protect you, maintain it. If an attack is eminent, anticipated, or
    comes as a surprise, instinctively reposition yourself by ¯maneuvering
    your feet or body to a more protective ¯POSITION or ¯stance to one that
    allows you instant and effective retaliation. Remember, while proper
    foot and body maneuvers aid you in repositioning your body to minimize
    the effects of your opponent's attack, think not only of protection,
    but also of maintaining easy access to your opponent without loss of
    continuity and effect.

    ”When fighting, the position of your body is not only important in
    terms of defense, but is essential when maximizing your offense. Your
    choice of target and weapon is also important. To prioritize targets
    legs are #1, groin #2, eyes #3, throat #4, arms #5, etc.


    FOOT AND HAND POSITIONS


    Associated with ¯BODY POSITIONS are ¯FOOT AND HAND POSITIONS.
    ¯There are only ¯four basic foot positions you may place yourself in
    while fighting. All other foot positions, as you will discover, are
    no more than variations of the following:

    1. ¯Left to left - that is your left foot is forward while your
    opponent's left foot is also in a forward position.

    2. ¯Right to left - your right foot is forward while your
    opponent's left foot is still in a forward position.

    3. ¯Left to right - your left foot is forward while your
    opponent's right foot is in a forward position.

    4. ¯Right to right - your right foot is forward while your
    opponent's right foot is still in a forward position. (¯See f illustrations.)



    Ed Parker Sr. Memories
    Archived with the permission of Ed Parker Jr.
    Ed Parker Sr. was the founder of the art known today as American Kenpo.
    In these files, Ed Parker Jr. shares his fathers unpublished notes and other memories with us.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Bob Hubbard For This Useful Post:

    Black St1300 (06-25-2007)

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. "Kenpo in the Streets" Chapter 2 a (notes)
    By Bob Hubbard in forum Ed Parker Sr. Memories from Ed Parker Jr.
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-23-2007, 03:05 AM
  2. Kenpo in the Streets" Chapter 1 (notes)
    By Bob Hubbard in forum Ed Parker Sr. Memories from Ed Parker Jr.
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-22-2007, 03:14 PM
  3. SGM Parker Unreleased Encyclopedia Of Kenpo Notes - Misc. Part II
    By Bob Hubbard in forum Ed Parker Sr. Memories from Ed Parker Jr.
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-22-2007, 03:07 PM
  4. More notes part 6 / SGM Parker Unreleased Encyclopedia Of Kenpo Notes - Part I
    By Bob Hubbard in forum Ed Parker Sr. Memories from Ed Parker Jr.
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-22-2007, 03:02 PM
  5. Kajukenbo Book
    By John Bishop in forum Products
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-30-2007, 02:56 PM