Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Question for Doc (types of arts)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    6,026
    Thanks
    1,199
    Thanked 1,520 Times in 909 Posts

    Default Question for Doc (types of arts)

    To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure exactly what you mean by a "way" art as opposed to any other. Would you mind elaborating on that and/or defining what types of arts there are in your opinion and how they differ? I am seriously interested in this and want to hear your insights. Thanks!
    "It is sobering to reflect that one of the best ways to get yourself a reputation as a dangerous citizen these days is to go about repeating the very phrases which our founding fathers used in the struggle for independence." – Charles A. Beard

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Celtic_Crippler For This Useful Post:

    kickboxinglover (11-04-2013)

  3. #2
    Doc's Avatar
    Doc
    Doc is offline
    AKI Contributing Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    8,454
    Thanks
    4,273
    Thanked 14,952 Times in 5,600 Posts

    Default Re: Question for Doc (types of arts)

    Quote Originally Posted by Celtic_Crippler View Post
    To be perfectly honest, I'm not sure exactly what you mean by a "way" art as opposed to any other. Would you mind elaborating on that and/or defining what types of arts there are in your opinion and how they differ? I am seriously interested in this and want to hear your insights. Thanks!
    The short version sir;

    [bKarate-do[/b], or way of the empty hand
    ju-do, or gentle way
    ken-do, or way of the sword.
    Aiki-do, or the way of bringing ki (or chi) together
    Kyu-do, or the way of the bow.

    At the end of WWII Japan had outlawed most of their martial and military arts, much as they had disarmed the samurai earlier in the 19 century. All of these had given way to cultural discipline arts. All of these are called 'way' or 'Do' arts with the exception of jiujitsu. Thus all of Japan's Cultural Arts end in "do." "Do" means "way." The emphasis is on the physical activity itself, and not fighting as a form of cutural and personal enlightment and discipline. Deeply rooted in the culture, many exercise, rituals, etc have nothing to actually do with the martial arts in general and fighting in particular. Thus the way you performed as taught by the founder was more important than any other aspect. This is the origin of the false importance of lineage in combatant arts. Staying true to the way of the founder and his lineage meant you were on the right path culturally for the chosen lineage. For arts that are not cuturally founded in the way philosophy like "Modern Kenpo, JKD, etc.," this has very little significance or meaning. These modern arts are performance based, regardless of origin or lineage, and effectiveness is the only true criterior.



    JUJUTSU,

    is sometimes called the father of the Japanese martial arts, with both Aikido and Judo developing directly from it. Jujutsu means "gentle art," or "to conquer by yielding or compliance." As one of the oldest Japanese martial arts, it originally, but not exclusively, stressed unarmed combat against armed opponents. It was studied by the Samurai to compliment their sword and spear techniques. It is the primary exception to the "way" arts but is limited with the exclusion of the sword.

    JU-DO,

    or the "gentle way," is a modern Japanese martial sport of wrestling that emphasizes throws and locks. It is also the origin of Brazillian Juijitsu. Judo would differ from Jujutsu in that it was no longer about street fighting, but considered "a mature form of physical education" that helped a person "to understand and demonstrate the living laws of movement" as an integral part of every aspect of life. Founded by an educator, it requires sport competition for advancement, and is the origin of the belt ranking systems in the martial arts.

    AIKI-DO,

    is a strictly Japanese martial art, embodies the three concepts that comprise its name: Ai, meaning harmony; Ki, meaning the spirit, or source of energy; and Do, meaning the "Way." Together they signify the way in which one can attain harmony with one's spirit. As such Aikido has deep religious undertones, which make it a way of life. In the words of its founder, Aikido is "the way of the love of mankind."

    KEN-DO,

    or the "Way of the sword," is the Japanese martial sport of swordfighting. Kendo's popularity grew rapidly as means of physical exercise and of spiritual developement. The Japanese Kendo Federation, founded in the early twentieth century, described its objectives clearly:
    "The aim of Kendo training is to mold the mind and the body, to cultivate a steady and firm attitude, to work with perseverance in order to progress in Kendo through the true and rigorous training, to hold courtesy and honor in high esteem, to deal with others with sincerity and finally, always to pursue the perfecting of oneself."

    IAI-DO,

    was founded in the middle of the 16th century. It is perfomed with a katana or Samurai sword, and the object is to draw the sword and strike so fast that the opponent is unable to defend against it. Iaido is built upon the old skill of Samurai iaijutsu where a Samurai would draw his sword when caught by surprise and kill his attacker in one move as the sword was drawn. Iaido is a noncombative art.

    So you see, these art forms emphasize that, other than street fighting skill, and were never intended to be about street combat. And although Jiujitsu is an actually fighting art, it is a partial art best utilized as an addition to other arts as its origin demonstrates.

    He who has all the answers and ask no questions, gets no answers. There are no secrets, only things you don't know because you haven't discovered the right question to seek the answer to. Thanks for asking a question sir.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

    "It's much easier to quote, than to know." - Ron Chapél


    www.MSUACF.com

  4. #3
    Doc's Avatar
    Doc
    Doc is offline
    AKI Contributing Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    8,454
    Thanks
    4,273
    Thanked 14,952 Times in 5,600 Posts

    Default Re: Question for Doc (types of arts)

    You're welcome.
    "Nothing is more dangerous than the conscientiously ignorant, or the sincerely stupid." - Martin Luther King Jr.

    "Knowledge speaks but wisdom listens." - Ed Parker Sr.

    "It's much easier to quote, than to know." - Ron Chapél


    www.MSUACF.com

  5. #4
    John Brewer's Avatar
    John Brewer is offline Starting Over
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,942
    Thanks
    1,381
    Thanked 421 Times in 330 Posts

    Default Re: Question for Doc (types of arts)

    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    You're welcome.
    Thanks great info

Remove Ads

Sponsored Links

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Some Martial Arts Definitions...
    By Bob Hubbard in forum Humor
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-10-2011, 03:00 AM
  2. A Question For Doc
    By Rob Broad in forum American Kenpo Insights
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-01-2007, 02:18 AM
  3. Politically Correct in Martial Arts?
    By Kempo91 in forum General Martial Arts
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 03-27-2007, 12:32 AM
  4. Book Review: Zen in the Martial Arts by Joe Hyams
    By Bob Hubbard in forum Product Reviews
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 09-01-2006, 03:17 PM